Suspension seat posts

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Sam Ford, Mar 14, 2003.

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  1. Sam Ford

    Sam Ford Guest

    Are suspension seat posts worth having? I am thinking mainly of comfort on made up road surfaces of
    various grades of maintenance and occasional unmade up tracks though not mountain bike rough trails.
     
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  2. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    I have suspension seatposts on all my bikes primarily to ease and prevent lower back issues and I
    like them a lot. Don't get post-modern - they end up too loose, wobbling side to side. I like the
    Rock Shox road post - fairly light and sleek. I also have a Rock shox on my hardtail MTB and it
    makes a huge difference where my ass used to get launched off of the saddle.

    "Sam Ford" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]nes.force9.net...
    > Are suspension seat posts worth having? I am thinking mainly of comfort on made up road surfaces
    > of various grades of maintenance and occasional
    unmade
    > up tracks though not mountain bike rough trails.
     
  3. "Sam Ford" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Are suspension seat posts worth having? I am thinking mainly of comfort on made up road
    > surfaces of various grades of maintenance and occasional unmade up tracks though not mountain
    > bike rough trails.

    My bike came with a Post Moderne and it's an OK shock absorber. I do like the way it rides. It is
    heavy and inexpensive. It has a one-bolt, ratchet type clamp that I do not like. I cannot find a
    comfortable saddle tilt. So, I bought a Tamer "Slick Willie" post with a micro-adjusting clamp. But
    I found that it has a significant flaw. The upper bushing has the key-way to keep the saddle pointed
    straight while it slides up and down. This bushing is nylon, threaded into an aluminum tube and
    locked in place with Loctite. That's right, glue. The Loctite on my post was not cured so, after a
    few miles, the seat started to spin as the bushing rotated in its threads. Rather then try to get it
    fixed, I just returned it for a refund. I do not like the design.

    Back to my Post Moderne seat clamp, I'm tempted to file off the ratchet ridges, set the seat tilt
    how I like it, and see if I can get it to stay there. Has anyone tried this?
     
  4. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    Sam Ford wrote:

    > Are suspension seat posts worth having? I am thinking mainly of comfort on made up road
    > surfaces of various grades of maintenance and occasional unmade up tracks though not mountain
    > bike rough trails.

    I've ridden Rockshox, USE, and Cannondale suspension posts, and they were all pretty good. Some
    shock absorbing saddles, like Turbomatics, work pretty good too on rough road surfaces that cause
    vibration. First things first, though -- how fat are your tires?

    Matt O.
     
  5. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >Are suspension seat posts worth having? I am thinking mainly of comfort on made up road
    >surfaces of various grades of maintenance and occasional unmade up tracks though not mountain
    >bike rough trails.

    I've got some small exprerience with a couple of ThudBusters. Will have more once I get the hardtail
    I'm working on assembled.

    For me, on a hardtail, it's either that or a lightly-sprung saddle like the Brooks B-72 or I
    don't ride.

    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
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