Suspension skewers vs. Titanium Skewers

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Scott, Mar 24, 2003.

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  1. Scott

    Scott Guest

    What is the difference between Suspension Skewers and Titanium Skewers, and why are they advertised
    differently.

    I know the Ti ones are titanium and the Suspension ones are usually chromoly, but why are they NAMED
    differently. Is it wrong to use Titanium skewers on a Rock Shock fork? Can I use suspension skewers
    on a rigid forked road or mountain bike?

    Scott
     
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  2. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    Scott wrote:
    > What is the difference between Suspension Skewers and Titanium Skewers, and why are they
    > advertised differently.
    >
    > I know the Ti ones are titanium and the Suspension ones are usually chromoly, but why are they
    > NAMED differently. Is it wrong to use Titanium skewers on a Rock Shock fork? Can I use suspension
    > skewers on a rigid forked road or mountain bike?
    >
    > Scott
    >

    Ti skewers are significantly weaker. At best, they are only recommended for the front tire of a
    light rider. Given what could happen when a skewer fails, that's not a place that I would sacrifice
    strength for a couple of oz's!

    David
     
  3. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "David Kunz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Scott wrote:
    > > What is the difference between Suspension Skewers and Titanium Skewers,
    and
    > > why are they advertised differently.
    > >
    > > I know the Ti ones are titanium and the Suspension ones are usually chromoly, but why are they
    > > NAMED differently. Is it wrong to use
    Titanium
    > > skewers on a Rock Shock fork? Can I use suspension skewers on a rigid forked road or
    > > mountain bike?
    > >
    > > Scott
    > >
    >
    > Ti skewers are significantly weaker. At best, they are only recommended for the front tire of a
    > light rider. Given what could happen when a skewer fails, that's not a place that I would
    > sacrifice strength for a couple of oz's!
    >

    Correct and definitely not recommended for sus forks.
     
  4. Ken

    Ken Guest

    David Kunz <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:
    > Ti skewers are significantly weaker. At best, they are only recommended for the front tire of a
    > light rider. Given what could happen when a skewer fails, that's not a place that I would
    > sacrifice strength for a couple of oz's!

    The weight difference between a steel skewer and a Ti skewer is not 2 ounces; it is more like
    0.2 ounces.
     
  5. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    <Scott> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > What is the difference between Suspension Skewers and
    Titanium Skewers, and
    > why are they advertised differently.
    >
    > I know the Ti ones are titanium and the Suspension ones
    are usually
    > chromoly, but why are they NAMED differently. Is it wrong
    to use Titanium
    > skewers on a Rock Shock fork? Can I use suspension
    skewers on a rigid
    > forked road or mountain bike?

    Sure.

    But you don't want to use Ti skewers with a suspension fork because Ti stretches too much, making
    for a less solid fork/wheel structure. This makes your fork feel flexier and less precise. It's
    probably less of a problem than it used to be because forks have gotten stiffer. But you can
    sometimes improve steering precision by using the sturdiest skewer with the highest clamping force
    you can find, along with a "suspension" hub with a larger clamping surface. BTW, the best skewers
    are usually plain-old Shimano and Campy, not the aftermarket ones.

    It's unlikely you'd break a skewer, but the steering precision issue can be significant.

    Matt O.
     
  6. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > David Kunz <[email protected]> wrote in
    >
    news:[email protected]
    t:

    > > Ti skewers are significantly weaker. At best, they are
    only recommended
    > > for the front tire of a light rider. Given what could
    happen when a
    > > skewer fails, that's not a place that I would sacrifice
    strength for a
    > > couple of oz's!
    >
    > The weight difference between a steel skewer and a Ti
    skewer is not 2 ounces;
    > it is more like 0.2 ounces.

    Depending on which two skewers you're comparing, it *is* more like 2 ounces. The really simple,
    leverless, plain bolt skewers weigh only an ounce or so each. Shimano and Campy ones are 3-4 ounces.

    Not that it matters.

    Matt O.
     
  7. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in news:jP7ga.6589$FN.3649486 @news2.news.adelphia.net:
    > Depending on which two skewers you're comparing, it *is* more like 2 ounces. The really
    > simple, leverless, plain bolt skewers weigh only an ounce or so each. Shimano and Campy ones
    > are 3-4 ounces.

    Many companies sell both Ti and steel versions of the same skewers. The difference in weight between
    the 2 versions is usually 10 grams or less.
     
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