Swapping Noodle on V Brakes from Left(non-drive) to Right (drive side) Arm

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Me, May 7, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Me

    Me Guest

    Hi, I have a quick question:

    Since my mtb was origionally designed for cantis and has cable routing on the right hand (or the
    driveside) side of the bike, I can't use VBrakes on the rear without running a really awkward long
    lenght of cable housing around the seatpost/downtube to the non-drive side of the bike. If you
    follow me.

    I initially thought about putting a clamp on cablestop on the left side of the toptube, but I'm
    having trouble finding one here in the UK. My frame tubing isn't an odd oversize size or anything (3
    & 3/4" around / my headset is 1 & 1/8" / and a 27.2 seatpost fits it) just that I cant find anywhere
    that has that diameter. I thought about using Loose Screws in the states but after contacting them
    they emailed back saying they they dont have anything that fits. Odd as I would have thought it was
    a very common, non-oversize size.

    Anyway, I think I've found a solution, but with a catch.

    Does anyone know a brake manufaturer that makes a V brake that I can swap the noodle and L-bend
    cable guide from the non-drive side arm to the drive side arm?

    Avid's top model the Single Digit Ultimate V-Brake that has this swaping-arm feature but its £80
    on Wiggle!

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/

    and that is for each brake so £160 or about $250 for a set of vbrakes. Odd, since my 2003 Vbrakes
    were only £45 each. Can't believe the Avids are twice as expensive!

    I currently am running XTRs with a long cable housing from the front lever to the Vbrake itself and
    its less than shit so if someone can recommend another V-brake that lets me swap the arms the cable
    enters then please let me know. Other than that, does anyone know how I could make a DIY a
    conversion to my current XTR v brakes?

    cheers
     
    Tags:


  2. Ben Reuter

    Ben Reuter Guest

    Paul's Motolites also have this feature- very pricey too, but very well made, and if you get
    the motolite BMX then there is enough up down adjustment to slap a set of 700c wheels on for
    road training

    Ben
     
  3. Me wrote:
    > Hi, I have a quick question:
    >
    > Since my mtb was origionally designed for cantis and has cable routing on the right hand (or the
    > driveside) side of the bike, I can't use VBrakes on the rear without running a really awkward long
    > lenght of cable housing around the seatpost/downtube to the non-drive side of the bike. If you
    > follow me.
    >
    > I initially thought about putting a clamp on cablestop on the left side of the toptube, but I'm
    > having trouble finding one here in the UK. My frame tubing isn't an odd oversize size or anything
    > (3 & 3/4" around / my headset is 1 & 1/8" / and a 27.2 seatpost fits it) just that I cant find
    > anywhere that has that diameter. I thought about using Loose Screws in the states but after
    > contacting them they emailed back saying they they dont have anything that fits. Odd as I would
    > have thought it was a very common, non-oversize size.
    >
    > Anyway, I think I've found a solution, but with a catch.
    >
    > Does anyone know a brake manufaturer that makes a V brake that I can swap the noodle and L-bend
    > cable guide from the non-drive side arm to the drive side arm?
    >
    > Avid's top model the Single Digit Ultimate V-Brake that has this swaping-arm feature but its £80
    > on Wiggle!
    >
    > http://www.wiggle.co.uk/
    >
    > and that is for each brake so £160 or about $250 for a set of vbrakes. Odd, since my 2003 Vbrakes
    > were only £45 each. Can't believe the Avids are twice as expensive!
    >
    > I currently am running XTRs with a long cable housing from the front lever to the Vbrake itself
    > and its less than shit so if someone can recommend another V-brake that lets me swap the arms the
    > cable enters then please let me know. Other than that, does anyone know how I could make a DIY a
    > conversion to my current XTR v brakes?
    >
    > cheers

    Cane Creek Direct Curve 5's work both ways, but you have to swap some parts around:

    http://www.canecreek.com/site/product/brakes/01_dc5.htm

    Jon Bond
     
  4. A shy bloke wrote:

    > Since my mtb was origionally designed for cantis and has cable routing on the right hand (or the
    > driveside) side of the bike, I can't use VBrakes on the rear without running a really awkward long
    > lenght of cable housing around the seatpost/downtube to the non-drive side of the bike. If you
    > follow me.
    >
    > I initially thought about putting a clamp on cablestop on the left side of the toptube, but I'm
    > having trouble finding one here in the UK. My frame tubing isn't an odd oversize size or anything
    > (3 & 3/4" around / my headset is 1 & 1/8" / and a 27.2 seatpost fits it) just that I cant find
    > anywhere that has that diameter. I thought about using Loose Screws in the states but after
    > contacting them they emailed back saying they they dont have anything that fits. Odd as I would
    > have thought it was a very common, non-oversize size.
    >
    > Anyway, I think I've found a solution, but with a catch.
    >
    > Does anyone know a brake manufaturer that makes a V brake that I can swap the noodle and L-bend
    > cable guide from the non-drive side arm to the drive side arm?

    Nope, but there are different noodles, commonly with either 90 degree or 135 degree bends. The
    primary purpose of this is for neater cable routing in front.

    Another fix would be to use full-length housing all the way from the lever to the noodle. It's a bit
    of extra weight, but it would work very well. You'l need zip ties or the like to secure the cable to
    the top tube.

    Sheldon "We Have Ways..." Brown +----------------------------------------------------------+
    | If only God would give me some clear sign! | Like making a large deposit in my name at a Swiss
    | bank. | --Woody Allen |
    +----------------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton,
    Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts
    shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  5. Woogoogle

    Woogoogle Guest

    "Me" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi, I have a quick question:
    Paul's components has a v-brake for you, see cambria bicycle outfitter. I've switched my noodle
    around same as you in the rear brake.
     
  6. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "Me" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>... <snip>
    > Does anyone know a brake manufaturer that makes a V brake that I can swap the noodle and L-bend
    > cable guide from the non-drive side arm to the drive side arm?
    >
    <snip>
    > I currently am running XTRs with a long cable housing from the front lever to the Vbrake itself
    > and its less than shit so if someone can recommend another V-brake that lets me swap the arms the
    > cable enters then please let me know. Other than that, does anyone know how I could make a DIY a
    > conversion to my current XTR v brakes?
    >

    I have swapped the noodle from right-entry to left-entry to work on my Lightning recumbent. I did
    this with a SRAM 7.0 caliper, but I think the same procedure might work for the XTR:

    1. Remove the noodle bracket from the right arm. A file or drill should destroy the rivet.
    2. Ream and tap the right arm to accept the cable clamp bolt. This was a m5x.8mm thread on my SRAM
    brake. This is where your judgement is needed- there may not be enough material to leave the arm
    strong enough to function successfully. The cable clamp bolt comes in from the back of the arm-
    otherwise the cable crosses at an angle.
    3. Attach the noodle bracket to the left arm. I used a small piece of copper tube as a bushing and a
    small screw and nut to hold the bracket in place. After the bracket was in place and I was sure
    it would rotate properly, I peened the screw onto the nut to insure it wouldn't come loose.

    So far it's worked fine. If you do this and it doesn't work, I don't know you.

    Jeff
     
  7. Me

    Me Guest

    Cheers for the advice about running a straight cable (ala road bike) from my brake levers direct
    to the rear brake and zip tieing, but thats what I have now and its only about 1/2 the power I
    would expect.

    Also thanks for the advice for checking into the cane creek and Pauls models as both seem to allow
    switching which is cool. Hopefully their price isn't as bad as Avids option which I still find hard
    to believe is about 30% more expensive than my current XTRs.

    ========
    One more question: has anyone actually used one of those 130 degree noodles that have been
    suggested? Perhaps I can still run the cable housing from the drive side cable stop to the standard
    xtr but put in a 130 degree noodle to accomodate the bend.

    Anyfeedback on using one would be much appreciated...

    "WooGoogle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Me" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Hi, I have a quick question:
    > Paul's components has a v-brake for you, see cambria bicycle outfitter. I've switched my noodle
    > around same as you in the rear brake.
     
  8. A shy person wrote:

    > Cheers for the advice about running a straight cable (ala road bike) from my brake levers direct
    > to the rear brake and zip tieing, but thats what I have now and its only about 1/2 the power I
    > would expect.

    If you used good quality cable housing this should make no difference in the "power" of the brake.
    The only downside of this routing is that it's a skosh heavier.

    > One more question: has anyone actually used one of those 130 degree noodles that have been
    > suggested? Perhaps I can still run the cable housing from the drive side cable stop to the
    > standard xtr but put in a 130 degree noodle to accomodate the bend.

    I use one on the front of my Bianchi B.a.S.S. because I'm a right/front brake guy. Works just fine,
    only need 1 finger to stop.

    Sheldon "Backwards?" Brown +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
    | The correct way to punctuate a sentence that starts: | “Of course it is none of my business
    | but--" | is to place a period after the word "but." | Don't use excessive force in supplying
    | such moron with a period. | Cutting his throat is only a momentary pleasure, | and is bound to
    | get you talked about. | --Robert A. Heinlein |
    +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton,
    Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts
    shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  9. Doug Goncz

    Doug Goncz Guest

    My Nashbar Jail Vbrakes come with two noodles. One is 90 degrees, the other is more like 135. So
    they swing both ways...

    Yours,

    Doug Goncz, Replikon Research, Seven Corners, VA http://users.aol.com/DGoncz If a computer won't do
    what needs to be done, lie to it. Don't try this trick on people.
     
  10. Me

    Me Guest

    hmmm, perhaps I'm doing something wrong, but using my shimano road brake housing I get a lot of
    movement in the housing itself when it flexes. I say about half power because no matter how I
    adjust the brake I cant lock it up (ie skid) even in loose dirt. Not that I want to but It takes
    forever to stopp!

    So perhaps I gotta give it another try with some beffier cable...

    cheers

    "Sheldon Brown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > A shy person wrote:
    >
    > > Cheers for the advice about running a straight cable (ala road bike)
    from my
    > > brake levers direct to the rear brake and zip tieing, but thats what I
    have
    > > now and its only about 1/2 the power I would expect.
    >
    > If you used good quality cable housing this should make no difference in the "power" of the brake.
    > The only downside of this routing is that it's a skosh heavier.
    >
    > > One more question: has anyone actually used one of those 130 degree
    noodles
    > > that have been suggested? Perhaps I can still run the cable housing from
    the
    > > drive side cable stop to the standard xtr but put in a 130 degree noodle
    to
    > > accomodate the bend.
    >
    > I use one on the front of my Bianchi B.a.S.S. because I'm a right/front brake guy. Works just
    > fine, only need 1 finger to stop.
    >
    > Sheldon "Backwards?" Brown +---------------------------------------------------------------------+
    > | The correct way to punctuate a sentence that starts: | “Of course it is none of my business
    > | but--" | is to place a period after the word "but." | Don't use excessive force in supplying
    > | such moron with a period. | Cutting his throat is only a momentary pleasure, | and is bound to
    > | get you talked about. | --Robert A. Heinlein |
    > +---------------------------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West
    > Newton, Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find
    > parts shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  11. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > "Sheldon Brown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > A shy person wrote:
    > > > Cheers for the advice about running a straight cable (ala road bike)
    > from my
    > > > brake levers direct to the rear brake and zip tieing, but thats what I
    > have
    > > > now and its only about 1/2 the power I would expect.

    (SB)> > If you used good quality cable housing this should make no difference in
    > > the "power" of the brake. The only downside of this routing is that it's a skosh heavier.

    (Shy)> > > One more question: has anyone actually used one of those 130 degree
    > noodles
    > > > that have been suggested? Perhaps I can still run the cable housing
    from
    > the
    > > > drive side cable stop to the standard xtr but put in a 130 degree
    noodle
    > to
    > > > accomodate the bend.

    (SB)> > I use one on the front of my Bianchi B.a.S.S. because I'm a right/front
    > > brake guy. Works just fine, only need 1 finger to stop.

    "Me" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > hmmm, perhaps I'm doing something wrong, but using my shimano road brake housing I get a lot of
    > movement in the housing itself when it flexes. I
    say
    > about half power because no matter how I adjust the brake I cant lock it
    up
    > (ie skid) even in loose dirt. Not that I want to but It takes forever to stopp!
    >
    > So perhaps I gotta give it another try with some beffier cable...

    I'm with Sheldon here. Pretty much any currently produced PTFE-lined spiral-wound brake casing
    should give you excellent response with minimal (if any) slop if it's set up at all well. "Road" [vs
    uh, . . . what??] casing is a new parsing to me - brake casing is brake casing if you stay in
    standard diameter. You're sure it is brake casing, right? Gear (high-helix) stuff has no place in a
    brake system!

    "Beefier cable" is not usually a reasonable or effective solution - that stuff is mostly for looks
    since we no longer use Magura motorcycle brake levers.

    The casing ends are trimmed square so the opening is not occluded, right? A light touch against a
    grindwheel gives a perfect edge. Perhaps there's excessive casing? Shoot for graceful economic
    curves which will still allow full motion of the handlebar through it full motion. A smear of a
    light oil on tghe wire is nice ( grease is excessvely sticky in those tight modern casings.) And
    ferrules are inplace where appropriate so the casing doesn't jam sideways into any stops, right? The
    noodle liner is undamaged, right? And lastly, when you unclip the wire from the lever, the lever
    swings easily with no resistance, right?
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  12. Me

    Me Guest

    Thanks for the advice, I'll take my brake housing apart again and start for scratch. Sure I can make
    it work better somehow!

    cheers again,

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "Sheldon Brown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > A shy person wrote:
    > > > > Cheers for the advice about running a straight cable (ala road bike)
    > > from my
    > > > > brake levers direct to the rear brake and zip tieing, but thats what
    I
    > > have
    > > > > now and its only about 1/2 the power I would expect.
    >
    > (SB)> > If you used good quality cable housing this should make no difference in
    > > > the "power" of the brake. The only downside of this routing is that it's a skosh heavier.
    >
    > (Shy)> > > One more question: has anyone actually used one of those 130 degree
    > > noodles
    > > > > that have been suggested? Perhaps I can still run the cable housing
    > from
    > > the
    > > > > drive side cable stop to the standard xtr but put in a 130 degree
    > noodle
    > > to
    > > > > accomodate the bend.
    >
    > (SB)> > I use one on the front of my Bianchi B.a.S.S. because I'm a right/front
    > > > brake guy. Works just fine, only need 1 finger to stop.
    >
    > "Me" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > hmmm, perhaps I'm doing something wrong, but using my shimano road brake housing I get a lot of
    > > movement in the housing itself when it flexes. I
    > say
    > > about half power because no matter how I adjust the brake I cant lock
    it
    > up
    > > (ie skid) even in loose dirt. Not that I want to but It takes forever to stopp!
    > >
    > > So perhaps I gotta give it another try with some beffier cable...
    >
    > I'm with Sheldon here. Pretty much any currently produced PTFE-lined spiral-wound brake casing
    > should give you excellent response with minimal (if any) slop if it's set
    up
    > at all well. "Road" [vs uh, . . . what??] casing is a new parsing to me - brake casing is brake
    > casing if you stay in standard diameter.
    You're
    > sure it is brake casing, right? Gear (high-helix) stuff has no place in a brake system!
    >
    > "Beefier cable" is not usually a reasonable or effective solution - that stuff is mostly for looks
    > since we no longer use Magura motorcycle brake levers.
    >
    > The casing ends are trimmed square so the opening is not occluded, right?
    A
    > light touch against a grindwheel gives a perfect edge. Perhaps there's excessive casing? Shoot for
    > graceful economic curves which will still
    allow
    > full motion of the handlebar through it full motion. A smear of a light oil on tghe wire is nice (
    > grease is excessvely sticky in those tight
    modern
    > casings.) And ferrules are inplace where appropriate so the casing doesn't jam sideways into any
    > stops, right? The noodle liner is
    undamaged,
    > right? And lastly, when you unclip the wire from the lever, the lever
    swings
    > easily with no resistance, right?
    > --
    > Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...