Sweet agony of choice - best all-around bike for under a grand?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bryanska, Oct 4, 2004.

  1. Bryanska

    Bryanska Guest

    Hi everyone,

    I proposed to my girlfriend this weekend (NOT as painful as many men
    would have you believe), and we had previously discussed how this
    would be a mutual engagement gifting. I thought about asking for a
    custom suit, custom-made shoes, or top-end pans.

    Then as I was riding my Schwinn Tempo, I remembered how much I enjoyed
    bicycling. So I ask this question to you:

    Given about $900, what is the bicycle you would purchase?

    Please keep in mind my situation:
    1) City dweller, mainly ride on roads and long Minneapolis bike paths.
    2) Sometimes I need to cruise around lazily.
    3) My properly-sized Schwinn hurts, dammit! Are all road bikes
    painful? Everyone tells me to suck it up, but my poor taint...

    So take that 900 bucks and run with it!
     
    Tags:


  2. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On 4 Oct 2004 07:55:53 -0700, [email protected] (Bryanska) wrote:

    >Hi everyone,
    >
    >I proposed to my girlfriend this weekend (NOT as painful as many men
    >would have you believe), and we had previously discussed how this
    >would be a mutual engagement gifting. I thought about asking for a
    >custom suit, custom-made shoes, or top-end pans.
    >
    >Then as I was riding my Schwinn Tempo, I remembered how much I enjoyed
    >bicycling. So I ask this question to you:
    >
    >Given about $900, what is the bicycle you would purchase?
    >
    >Please keep in mind my situation:
    >1) City dweller, mainly ride on roads and long Minneapolis bike paths.
    >2) Sometimes I need to cruise around lazily.
    >3) My properly-sized Schwinn hurts, dammit! Are all road bikes
    >painful? Everyone tells me to suck it up, but my poor taint...
    >
    >So take that 900 bucks and run with it!


    Stop 'sucking it up' and find yourself a good bike shop. Take your
    present bike in and go over what hurts and where, talk about what you
    want to do with a new bike, etc. A good bike shop will listen and try
    to figure out how to get you on a bike that works.

    So run around until you find the right bike shop, and the then the
    right bike will be easy.

    Surly Cross-Check
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete

    Bianchi Volpe
    Cannondale T800
     
  3. Bryanska wrote:
    > Hi everyone,
    >
    > I proposed to my girlfriend this weekend (NOT as painful as many men
    > would have you believe), and we had previously discussed how this
    > would be a mutual engagement gifting. I thought about asking for a
    > custom suit, custom-made shoes, or top-end pans.
    >
    > Then as I was riding my Schwinn Tempo, I remembered how much I enjoyed
    > bicycling. So I ask this question to you:
    >
    > Given about $900, what is the bicycle you would purchase?
    >
    > Please keep in mind my situation:
    > 1) City dweller, mainly ride on roads and long Minneapolis bike paths.
    > 2) Sometimes I need to cruise around lazily.
    > 3) My properly-sized Schwinn hurts, dammit! Are all road bikes
    > painful? Everyone tells me to suck it up, but my poor taint...
    >
    > So take that 900 bucks and run with it!


    Top-end pans?!? You've got more pressing issues than bicycling.

    Bill "nuke it, fry it, or grill it" S.
     
  4. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Mon, 04 Oct 2004 16:38:20 GMT,
    <[email protected]>, "B i l l S o r n s o n"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Top-end pans?!? You've got more pressing issues than bicycling.
    >
    >Bill "nuke it, fry it, or grill it" S.


    To me, "top end pans" means some good quality steel drums but a
    mediocre chromed quadrophonic pan set is about twice his budget.
    --
    zk
     
  5. bentbrian

    bentbrian New Member

    Joined:
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    As previously posted go to your LBS and get propperly fitted, on a new bike if necessary. If it is ultimate comfort you are shooting for don't rule out a recumbent. Entry level bikes can be had for less than a grand. Even decent ones can be had for a good price as used.

    'bent Brian
     
  6. Zoot Katz wrote:
    > Mon, 04 Oct 2004 16:38:20 GMT,
    > <[email protected]>, "B i l l S o r n s o n"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Top-end pans?!? You've got more pressing issues than bicycling.
    >>
    >> Bill "nuke it, fry it, or grill it" S.

    >
    > To me, "top end pans" means some good quality steel drums but a
    > mediocre chromed quadrophonic pan set is about twice his budget.


    There's hope for you yet, Zoot.

    Bill "men beat on stuff, as opposed to sautéing" S.
     
  7. B i l l S o r n s o n wrote:
    > Bill "men beat on stuff, as opposed to sautéing" S.


    Back in the dawn of time, men beat on the ground with sticks and
    screamed at the sky and called it "religion."

    Now they just call it "golf."

    -km
     
  8. tcmedara

    tcmedara Guest

    B i l l S o r n s o n <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Bryanska wrote:
    >> Hi everyone,
    >>
    >> I proposed to my girlfriend this weekend (NOT as painful as many men
    >> would have you believe), and we had previously discussed how this
    >> would be a mutual engagement gifting. I thought about asking for a
    >> custom suit, custom-made shoes, or top-end pans.
    >>
    >> Then as I was riding my Schwinn Tempo, I remembered how much I
    >> enjoyed bicycling. So I ask this question to you:
    >>
    >> Given about $900, what is the bicycle you would purchase?
    >>
    >> Please keep in mind my situation:
    >> 1) City dweller, mainly ride on roads and long Minneapolis bike
    >> paths. 2) Sometimes I need to cruise around lazily.
    >> 3) My properly-sized Schwinn hurts, dammit! Are all road bikes
    >> painful? Everyone tells me to suck it up, but my poor taint...
    >>
    >> So take that 900 bucks and run with it!

    >
    > Top-end pans?!? You've got more pressing issues than bicycling.
    >
    > Bill "nuke it, fry it, or grill it" S.


    I'm guessing any woman who wants top-end cookware is gonna feed you well --
    not bad. Seems to me though that the OP had them on *his* wish list.
    Either he's going to be doing the cooking or he's operating under the
    delusion that expensive cookware will induce the future wife to cook.
    That's similar to the idea that buying the wife expensive underwear will
    induce her to take it off more easily. Both those scenarios are likely to
    end up in disappointment. (I speak from experience!)

    Take the $900, double it, buy what you want and realize you'll never have
    such a great deal again.

    Tom
     
  9. Dan Cosley

    Dan Cosley Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Bryanska wrote:
    >
    > Given about $900, what is the bicycle you would purchase?
    >
    > Please keep in mind my situation:
    > 1) City dweller, mainly ride on roads and long Minneapolis bike paths.
    > 2) Sometimes I need to cruise around lazily.
    > 3) My properly-sized Schwinn hurts, dammit! Are all road bikes
    > painful? Everyone tells me to suck it up, but my poor taint...


    Not enough info, really. If you have dreams of touring, the Erik's
    on Minnetonka has a couple of 2003 Cannondale T-2000s for $1099 (down
    from $1500) that seem to be good value and could be comfy and fun
    for the kind of riding you describe. I'm trying to talk myself into
    buying one but on a student budget it's a tough sell.

    The singlespeed/fixed idea others have mentioned is interesting,
    especially if you mostly ride on the paths and the flatter parts
    of the city.

    -- Dan

    --
    Dan Cosley ([email protected] * http://www.cs.umn.edu/~cosley/)
    GroupLens Research Lab, Univ of MN (http://movielens.umn.edu/ * 612.624.8372)
    *** Just a foot soldier in the Army of Truth ***
     
  10. tcmedara wrote:
    > B i l l S o r n s o n <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Bryanska wrote:
    >>> Hi everyone,
    >>>
    >>> I proposed to my girlfriend this weekend (NOT as painful as many men
    >>> would have you believe), and we had previously discussed how this
    >>> would be a mutual engagement gifting. I thought about asking for a
    >>> custom suit, custom-made shoes, or top-end pans.


    {snip}

    >> Top-end pans?!? You've got more pressing issues than bicycling.
    >>
    >> Bill "nuke it, fry it, or grill it" S.


    > I'm guessing any woman who wants top-end cookware is gonna feed you
    > well -- not bad. Seems to me though that the OP had them on *his*
    > wish list. {snip}


    Duh, that's why I razzed him!

    Bill "clear as pea soup" S.
     
  11. Bryanska

    Bryanska Guest

    Six responses and only one suggested bike?

    Come on, you can do better. I like to read about 'em.
     
  12. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On 4 Oct 2004 19:00:32 -0700, [email protected] (Bryanska) wrote:

    >Six responses and only one suggested bike?
    >
    >Come on, you can do better. I like to read about 'em.


    Hey, I also suggested Cannondale T800, Bianchi Volpe!!

    Specialized Sirrus.

    Marin Point Reyes.

    Trek XO1.

    Kona Dr. Dew....

    But really, your best bet is to find a bike shop, settle on the style
    of bike, maybe a few models, and come back and ask again with more
    info. Flat bars? Drop bars? 26 inch tires, 700?
     
  13. Kevan Smith </dev/null> wrote:
    >On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 09:01:07 -0700, Dan Daniel <[email protected]>
    >from wrote:
    >
    >>Surly Cross-Check
    >>http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/surly-cross-check.html#complete

    >
    >This can be built up as a fixed-gear, too.
    >
    >But, far sexier _and_ less costly is this:
    >
    >http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/bianchi04/pistase.html


    I ran across that page yesterday and had to spend 10 minutes
    just rolling back and forth through the pictures.

    I swear there's something about a Bianchi frame that's just
    more beautiful than almost any other. And the silver seat
    is pure pornstar schmata.

    That particular one reminds me a lot of my Holdsworth,
    except for the slight slope in the Bianchi's top tube and
    its straighter fork and the rearward lugs on the back.

    I wonder how much it'd cost to upgrade it to a 2x10 speed...

    And paint it Celeste...

    Shel?

    >Uhh, put a brake on it for street use.


    That too.

    --Blair
    "Though I seldom desire for stopping."
     
  14. On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 19:00:32 -0700, Bryanska wrote:

    > Six responses and only one suggested bike?
    >
    > Come on, you can do better. I like to read about 'em.


    I have a Jamis Aurora and it's fabulous.

    Satisfied? ;)

    Incidentally, go to 66th in South St. Paul where it meets the river. Cool!

    Reid
    Prospect Park
     
  15. Bryanska

    Bryanska Guest

    I don't think I'm ready for a fixed gear. I like gears.

    My Schwinn's drop bars hurt my hand webs, wrists, and elbows. (And
    yes, it's sized well and I've been to two LBS to try and fix this, but
    bike people can sometimes make you feel like you're doing something
    wrong, especially if you're not planning on buying anything) So maybe
    start out with ergonomic drops & a good stem, and eventually go with
    those butterflies I've been seeing?

    I don't know the differences between the wheel sizes. Anything more
    universal than the other?

    I used to have a 1991 Trek 720 hybrid that I rode hard for 10 years.
    Loved it. It was TALL, but otherwise OK.

    And I should have known I'd get guff for the pans. I like to cook. We
    both do. Can't bike in MN when it's 20 below, but you can make a mean
    chili.
     
  16. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Bryanska) writes:

    > And I should have known I'd get guff for the pans. I like to cook. We
    > both do.


    So do I. A complete set of all-copper cookware would be
    wonderful to have.

    > Can't bike in MN when it's 20 below, but you can make a mean
    > chili.


    It doesn't get that cold here in Vancouver, but one of my
    favourite comfort foods to make when the weather gets ugly
    is clam chowder. The worse the weather is, the better the
    chowder becomes.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Nothing is safe from me.
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  17. Blair P. Houghton wrote:
    > Kevan Smith </dev/null> wrote:
    >>http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/bianchi04/pistase.html

    >
    >
    > I ran across that page yesterday and had to spend 10 minutes
    > just rolling back and forth through the pictures.


    Yeah. Pretty bike.

    And then I noticed the smallest frame size is 51 cm.

    Bleah.

    *whine*

    -km the shorty
     
  18. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    5 Oct 2004 05:52:39 -0700,
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Bryanska) wrote:

    >And I should have known I'd get guff for the pans. I like to cook. We
    >both do. Can't bike in MN when it's 20 below, but you can make a mean
    >chili.


    I like enamelled cast iron cookware.
    Le Creuset enamelled cast iron, to be precise.
    --
    zk
     
  19. Bryanska

    Bryanska Guest

    The Bianchi is pretty, but as my only bike, do I want one originally
    intended for fixed-gear riding?

    In my research of the bikes here, I have yet to find serious fault
    with the Surly Cross Check. It really looks tasty!

    Am I being naive about that one?

    Thanks for all your help!
     
  20. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 07:55:53 -0700, Bryanska wrote:

    > bicycling. So I ask this question to you:
    >
    > Given about $900, what is the bicycle you would purchase?


    I haven't been bike shopping in a while, but I'm familiar with owning one
    bike and doing everything with it.

    I think a cyclocross or touring type bike would be ideal. They're quite
    similar these days in many ways. Basically a road type bike, but with drop
    handlebars level or an inch higher than the seat, narrowish, but comfy
    tires--I'd say start with 700x28s and go from there, canti brakes so you
    can mount fenders in your nasty clime, and plenty of braze ons for racks,
    bottles, and 8 track players just in case. The bike can be ridden stripped
    down with skinnies in the summer, or turned into a winter firewood hauler.

    I've only looked in catalogues, but the Jamis cyclocross bikes seem like a
    great bang for the buck, also the Specialized Sequoia looks like a very
    intelligent design for those that want to be speedy, but not suffer.

    I'd steer away from flat bars, they aren't more comfy for most despite
    they're newfound popularity on 'fitness' bikes, and get a bike with drops.
    The proper bend at the right hight combined with comfy brifters will blow
    your old Tempo's hand position out of the water.

    I'd also stay away from dual pivot or sidepull brakes if you want an all
    rounder. Dual pivots will stop you great and they look snappy, but do you
    want to perhaps mount some fatter tires for winter and/or fenders? Then
    you need to go with cantilevers or something else that affords you the
    clearance.

    As to your suffering 'taint', well, that's probably because you have a
    crappy saddle now. Hopefully your new ride will come with a nice one, but
    don't "just live with it" if it's painful, get something different. A
    hundred bucks on a saddle, if that's what it takes, is little to spend if
    it lets you ride comfortably. Many on the forums are old school leather
    saddle fans and I've heard great raves about the Koobi saddles and may
    have to try one myself.

    The Tempo ain't a bad ride if you don't need the latest technology:
    change the saddle and get the bars to a comfy position, or even try a new
    bend. Perhaps spruce it up for a hundred something bucks and have a city
    ride that won't make you cry if it gets ripped off.

    :D
     
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