Sweet Wine Substitute - Help Request !!!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Musky Killer, Dec 17, 2003.

  1. Musky Killer

    Musky Killer Guest

    Hello,

    I am making a recipe which calls for 'Sweet Wine' is there a substitute without alcohol I can use
    for this item ??

    Thank you !

    Signed:

    Rookie In The Kitchen :)
     
    Tags:


  2. You don't say what the recipe is for. Grape juice would be my first guess for a non-alcoholic
    substitute for sweet wine, but knowing what the finished product is supposed to be is a prerequisite
    for any answer.

    --Lia

    Musky wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am making a recipe which calls for 'Sweet Wine' is there a substitute without alcohol I can use
    > for this item ??
    >
    > Thank you !
    >
    > Signed:
    >
    > Rookie In The Kitchen :)
     
  3. Musky Killer

    Musky Killer Guest

    Hello Julia,

    Well, this is a strange one, but I bought a book called "Roman Cookery" by Mark Grant from Amazon.
    Yup, u guessed it, ancient-roman meals. Many of them call for a 'Sweet Wine' to be used. In this
    case, it is for a meal called:

    "Hare In A Sweet Sauce"

    It states:

    "1/2 pint sweet white wine.....you need the sweetest dessert wine you can find to give the dish the
    sweet and sour flavour of which the Romans were so fond."

    So there you have it. An unusual meal; but should be fun to make and eat during the Christmas
    holidays :)

    Cordially,

    MK

    "Julia Altshuler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]_s52...
    > You don't say what the recipe is for. Grape juice would be my first guess for a non-alcoholic
    > substitute for sweet wine, but knowing what the finished product is supposed to be is a
    > prerequisite for any answer.
    >
    > --Lia
    >
    >
    > Musky wrote:
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I am making a recipe which calls for 'Sweet Wine' is there a substitute without alcohol I can
    > > use for this item ??
    > >
    > > Thank you !
    > >
    > > Signed:
    > >
    > > Rookie In The Kitchen :)
     
  4. Jerry Avins

    Jerry Avins Guest

    Musky wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I am making a recipe which calls for 'Sweet Wine' is there a substitute without alcohol I can use
    > for this item ??
    >
    > Thank you !
    >
    > Signed:
    >
    > Rookie In The Kitchen :)

    Concord grape juice. Manischevitz is one brand.

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
    ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
     
  5. In that case, you definitely want grape juice. I'd say Welch's red, but the color is up for
    debate. --Lia

    Musky wrote:

    > Well, this is a strange one, but I bought a book called "Roman Cookery" by Mark Grant from Amazon.
    > Yup, u guessed it, ancient-roman meals. Many of them call for a 'Sweet Wine' to be used. In this
    > case, it is for a meal called:
    >
    > "Hare In A Sweet Sauce"
    >
    > It states:
    >
    > "1/2 pint sweet white wine.....you need the sweetest dessert wine you can find to give the dish
    > the sweet and sour flavour of which the Romans were so fond."
     
  6. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Wed, 17 Dec 2003 22:34:36 GMT, "Musky Killer"
    <spkevans(NOSPAM]@rogers.com> wrote:

    >I am making a recipe which calls for 'Sweet Wine' is there a substitute without alcohol I can use
    >for this item ??

    There are many non-alcoholic wines on the shelves. Some cold duck or spumante comes to mind (just
    the latter today). You shouldn't need to worry wbout cooking with wine as almost all of the alcohol
    evaporates, leaving about as much alcohol as you'd find in bread.

    -sw
     
  7. Wardna

    Wardna Guest

    >You shouldn't need to worry wbout cooking with wine as almost all of the alcohol evaporates,
    >leaving about as much alcohol as you'd find in bread.
    >

    And if you're worried about alcohol residues, you'll have to give up vanilla extract, as well.
     
  8. stan

    stan Guest

    In rec.food.cooking Musky Killer <spkevans(NOSPAM]@rogers.com> wrote:
    > Hello,

    > I am making a recipe which calls for 'Sweet Wine' is there a substitute without alcohol I can use
    > for this item ??

    Probably grape juice, but it really depends on the recipe.
     
  9. Jerry Avins

    Jerry Avins Guest

    Steve Wertz wrote:
    > ... You shouldn't need to worry wbout cooking with wine as almost all of the alcohol evaporates,
    > leaving about as much alcohol as you'd find in bread.

    That's what I thought too, until a thread here, citing actual tests, showed otherwise. I don't see
    much alcohol surviving a serious reduction, but most of the alcohol in wine to flavor stews and for
    ordinary deglazing stays in the pot. What we hadn't figured on is the strong affinity that water and
    alcohol have for each other. Although alcohol might evaporate by itself, it doesn't easily separate
    from water.

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
    ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
     
  10. When people like the original poster say they're looking for an alcohol-free substitute, they can
    have 2 reasons in mind. They might be thinking of health and nutrition concerns, or they might be
    thinking of religious issues.

    If it is a matter of health and nutrition, I'm glad to point out that the alcohol evaporates out
    during cooking so they have nothing to worry about. I get interested in exactly how much alcohol is
    left and how that compares with amounts in vanilla extract or bread.

    But if the underlying reason is religious, I have to stop and assume the person knows the tenets of
    his/her religion better than I do. I'm sure it doesn't make sense to me, but I'm not here to point
    out that I think their religion is senseless. Pointing out that the alcohol evaporates out of the
    wine would be like pointing out that there's no pork left on the dish after it has been washed. They
    know that.

    --Lia
     
  11. stan

    stan Guest

    In rec.food.cooking Musky Killer <spkevans(NOSPAM]@rogers.com> wrote:

    > It states:

    > "1/2 pint sweet white wine.....you need the sweetest dessert wine you can find to give the dish
    > the sweet and sour flavour of which the Romans were so fond."

    > So there you have it. An unusual meal; but should be fun to make and eat during the Christmas
    > holidays :)

    So why not buy a bottle of a sweet white dessert wine? Is there someone who will be eating the dish
    who has a problem with alcohol? If not, then there really is no reason not to use the recommended
    kind of wine. If you do have someone who has trouble with alcohol, then white grapejuice might work,
    but it certainly won't be the same as if you used a sweet white wine.
     
  12. Peggy

    Peggy Guest

    Julia Altshuler wrote:
    > In that case, you definitely want grape juice. I'd say Welch's red, but the color is up for
    > debate. --Lia
    >
    >
    > Musky wrote:
    >
    >> Well, this is a strange one, but I bought a book called "Roman Cookery" by Mark Grant from
    >> Amazon. Yup, u guessed it, ancient-roman meals. Many of them call for a 'Sweet Wine' to be used.
    >> In this case, it is for a meal called:
    >>
    >> "Hare In A Sweet Sauce"
    >>
    >> It states:
    >>
    >> "1/2 pint sweet white wine.....you need the sweetest dessert wine you can find to give the dish
    >> the sweet and sour flavour of which the Romans were so fond."
    >
    >

    Grape juice? Manischewitz? Ugh! They're yucky and they're purple! Try a Riesling or Vidal ice wine,
    or a Vignoles or Ravat (the latter two are different names for the same grape).Make sure the
    residual sugar is 3% or more (ask the wine-store staff). They're all sweet white wines with a good
    acid balance, and would be wonderful for cooking rabbit.

    Cheers! Peg
     
  13. x-no-archive: yes

    When I see this question come up, I always wonder whether anyone has tried marketing something
    like alcohol free, wine concentrates for cooking. It seems like there could be a fairly good
    market for that.

    Naomi D.
     
  14. The Cook

    The Cook Guest

    [email protected] (Naomi Darvell) wrote:

    >x-no-archive: yes
    >
    >When I see this question come up, I always wonder whether anyone has tried marketing something
    >like alcohol free, wine concentrates for cooking. It seems like there could be a fairly good
    >market for that.
    >
    >
    >Naomi D.

    There are alcohol free wines. Graham Kerr used them after swearing off the hard stuff. I do not know
    of any by name.
    --
    Susan N.

    There are 10 types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who do not.
     
  15. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 09:21:35 -0500, Jerry Avins <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Wertz wrote:
    >> ... You shouldn't need to worry wbout cooking with wine as almost all of the alcohol
    >> evaporates, leaving about as much alcohol as you'd find in bread.
    >
    >That's what I thought too, until a thread here, citing actual tests, showed otherwise. I don't see
    >much alcohol surviving a serious reduction, but most of the alcohol in wine to flavor stews and for
    >ordinary deglazing stays in the pot. What we hadn't figured on is the strong affinity that water
    >and alcohol have for each other. Although alcohol might evaporate by itself, it doesn't easily
    >separate from water.

    Whatever. The point is that if someone wishes to cook *without* alcohol, the answer isn't "oh, well,
    it goes away, mostly." That wasn't the question. Substitutes for "sweet wine" might include white or
    purple grape juice, apple cider/juice, or other fruit juices.
     
  16. Naomi Darvell wrote:
    >
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > When I see this question come up, I always wonder whether anyone has tried marketing something
    > like alcohol free, wine concentrates for cooking. It seems like there could be a fairly good
    > market for that.
    >
    > Naomi D.

    You can buy sherry flavoring. McCormick (sp?) sells it.

    Bert
     
  17. Steve House

    Steve House Guest

    If it is a cooked recipe, the alcohol will evaporate during the cooking process so it's moot whether
    it starts with alcohol or not. Some people claim that even a few parts-per-million order of
    magnitude residue would be unacceptable but that defys both common sense and basic biochemistry and
    pharmacology 101 and I simply don't buy it. Even your basic fresh squeezed orange juice or nice
    crispy apple contains a slight trace of ethanol. If it's not going to be cooked, then a de-
    alcoholized wine could be used.

    "Musky Killer" <spkevans(NOSPAM]@rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am making a recipe which calls for 'Sweet Wine' is there a
    substitute
    > without alcohol I can use for this item ??
    >
    > Thank you !
    >
    > Signed:
    >
    > Rookie In The Kitchen :)
     
  18. "Steve House" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If it is a cooked recipe, the alcohol will evaporate during the cooking process so it's moot
    > whether it starts with alcohol or not. Some people claim that even a few parts-per-million order
    > of magnitude residue would be unacceptable but that defys both common sense and basic biochemistry
    > and pharmacology 101 and I simply don't buy it.

    But there may be more than a few parts per million. See below. Ed [email protected]
    http://pages.cthome.net/edhome

    But, what about cooking with alcohol? This seems to be of concern to some of you as we occasionally
    call for alcohol in our cooking -- it's an excellent way to add flavor to foods. Most, but not all
    of the alcohol disappears, or evaporates, leaving few calories.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture has published the following table of alcohol content in cooked
    foods. Our dietitian uses this information in determining the nutritional analysis and exchanges of
    any recipe in which we call for alcohol. You might find the results interesting and helpful in your
    cooking of other recipes which include alcohol.

    preparation method percent retained

    alcohol added to boiling liquid & removed from heat 85%

    alcohol flamed 75%

    no heat, stored overnight 70%

    baked, 25 minutes, alcohol not stirred into mixture 45%

    baked/simmered, alcohol stirred into mixture

    15 minutes 40%

    30 minutes 35%

    1 hour 25%

    1.5 hours 20%

    2 hours 10%

    2.5 hours 5%

    What if you and/or your doctor decides that you should not cook with alcohol -- what substitutions
    can you make in our recipes and that of others which call for wine, beer, etc.

    In savory dishes for each cup (240 ml) of wine in the recipe, substitute 7/8 cup (210 ml) of fat-
    free low-sodium chicken, beef, vegetable broth, apple juice, white grape juice, or tomato juice,
    with 2 tablespoons (30 ml) fresh lemon juice or vinegar.

    In desserts, substitute fruit juice for the wine, adding a dash of balsamic vinegar to the juice.

    For orange liqueur such as Grand Marnier, use an equivalent amount of frozen orange juice
    concentrate plus some grated orange zest.

    For coffee liqueur, use double-strength espresso or instant coffee made with 4 to 6 times the amount
    of coffee normally used.

    For brandy or rum, try a small amount of brandy or rum extract, or pure vanilla extract.
     
  19. Jacki222

    Jacki222 New Member

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    The point the OP may be making is mine which is why I happened on this thread via Google. I don't like sweet wine, I'm interested in making a chicken liver pate which calls for Madera, Port or Brandy. I don't like any of these and don't want to buy a bottle, use two TBS and have the rest turn to vinegar. (Well, except for the brandy, which would only be used if I had a dinner date which isn't likely to happen in the near future).

    So grape juice it is, although a Pinot Noir (which is WAY not sweet) would be more convenient.
     
  20. Cathy Keele

    Cathy Keele New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2013
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    Actually, the process to get the Vanilla Bean is more important.
    Often in health food stores Vanilla is extracted in many ways.
    Or there is The BEAN itself which can be purchased fresh,
    slit and scrapped. That would be the best flavor. Please
    think FRESH INGREDIENTS and not what it is a bottle.
    ck
     
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