switching tire sizes...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Joel Rose, Feb 5, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Joel Rose

    Joel Rose Guest

    Silly question(s) but here goes. Can I put a 700x25 tire on a rim that currently holds a 700x23
    tire? I'm wondering if just the tires can be swapped. Or would an entire separate wheel set be
    needed for each tire size?

    My trainer seems to be eating my good road tire and the only spare I have at the moment is of the
    larger size. And yes I have light pressure on the tire while it is in the trainer. Maybe I should
    ditch the trainer for a better one??

    Thanks, JRose
     
    Tags:


  2. lisated

    lisated Guest

    "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Silly question(s) but here goes. Can I put a 700x25 tire on a rim that currently holds a 700x23
    > tire? I'm wondering if just the tires can be swapped. Or would an entire separate wheel set be
    > needed for each tire size?

    Yes, you can just swap the tires.

    Ted Bennett
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Silly question(s) but here goes. Can I put a 700x25 tire on a rim that currently holds a 700x23
    > tire? I'm wondering if just the tires can be swapped. Or would an entire separate wheel set be
    > needed for each tire
    size?
    >
    > My trainer seems to be eating my good road tire and the only spare I have
    at
    > the moment is of the larger size. And yes I have light pressure on the
    tire
    > while it is in the trainer. Maybe I should ditch the trainer for a better one??

    Yes on the tire swap. You want the roller set such that the tire deforms at least as much as it
    would on the road. Less invites chafing.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  4. jro-<< Silly question(s) but here goes. Can I put a 700x25 tire on a rim that currently holds a
    700x23 tire?

    yes and even a 28c if you have clearance of the frameset. All rims can support a variety of tire
    sizes/widths.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    Put on any size tire you like. The bigger the better and find a cheapo.

    I don't use the trainer but my wife does. I've got a very beat rear wheel with a $10 tire on it. The
    reason that I change the whole wheel is that I believe that holding the wheel by the ends of the
    axel and rocking side to side puts strain on a wheel.

    On Wed, 5 Feb 2003 23:26:59 -0500, "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Silly question(s) but here goes. Can I put a 700x25 tire on a rim that currently holds a 700x23
    >tire? I'm wondering if just the tires can be swapped. Or would an entire separate wheel set be
    >needed for each tire size?
    >
    >My trainer seems to be eating my good road tire and the only spare I have at the moment is of the
    >larger size. And yes I have light pressure on the tire while it is in the trainer. Maybe I should
    >ditch the trainer for a better one??
    >
    >Thanks, JRose
     
  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > On Wed, 5 Feb 2003 23:26:59 -0500, "Joel Rose" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Silly question(s) but here goes. Can I put a 700x25 tire on a rim that currently holds a 700x23
    > >tire? I'm wondering if just the tires can be swapped. Or would an entire separate wheel set be
    > >needed for each tire
    size?
    > >
    > >My trainer seems to be eating my good road tire and the only spare I have
    at
    > >the moment is of the larger size. And yes I have light pressure on the
    tire
    > >while it is in the trainer. Maybe I should ditch the trainer for a better one??

    "Paul Kopit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Put on any size tire you like. The bigger the better and find a cheapo.
    >
    > I don't use the trainer but my wife does. I've got a very beat rear wheel with a $10 tire on it.
    > The reason that I change the whole wheel is that I believe that holding the wheel by the ends of
    > the axel and rocking side to side puts strain on a wheel.

    What sort of strain?

    Could you compare/contrast with actual road impacts?

    I hear that comment a lot lately but so far never a good explanataion. It usually starts with, "I
    heard that trainers are bad for bikes". As someone who regularly aligns forks that have run headlong
    in to immobile objects and who straightens/replaces rims that have been bashed, I have yet to see
    similar impacts from trainers!!
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  7. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    A Muzi <[email protected]> writes:

    >>> My trainer seems to be eating my good road tire and the only spare I have at the moment is of
    >>> the larger size. And yes I have light pressure on the tire while it is in the trainer. Maybe I
    >>> should ditch the trainer for a better one??

    >> I don't use the trainer but my wife does. I've got a very beat rear wheel with a $10 tire on it.
    >> The reason that I change the whole wheel is that I believe that holding the wheel by the ends of
    >> the axel and rocking side to side puts strain on a wheel.

    > What sort of strain?

    > Could you compare/contrast with actual road impacts?

    > I hear that comment a lot lately but so far never a good explanation. It usually starts with, "I
    > heard that trainers are bad for bikes". As someone who regularly aligns forks that have run
    > headlong in to immobile objects and who straightens/replaces rims that have been bashed, I have
    > yet to see similar impacts from trainers!!

    I think this is a case of missing cause and effect. Trainers with less than about 8" diameter
    rollers can damage tires and this is often misattributed to various unrelated effects. Flexing a
    tire at a continuous high rate causes internal heating and tread delamination ala Ford Explorer.
    Considering the length and curvature of the contact patch should make apparent how severe tire
    casing flex is. I recall tubular tires coming apart while riding small diameter rollers along with
    all the conjecture about the cause. This does not affect wheels nearly as much, load distribution
    from the tire being broader.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  8. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    I'm no engineer. On the road, when you stand and rock from side to side, the frame gives and the
    spokes and wheels absorb strain.

    If just seems go be an unnecessary stress on the frame.

    On Thu, 6 Feb 2003 10:42:09 -0600, "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What sort of strain?
    >
    >Could you compare/contrast with actual road impacts?
    >
    >I hear that comment a lot lately but so far never a good explanataion. It usually starts with, "I
    >heard that trainers are bad for bikes". As someone who regularly aligns forks that have run
    >headlong in to immobile objects and who straightens/replaces rims that have been bashed, I have yet
    >to see similar impacts from trainers!!
    >--
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >I hear that comment a lot lately but so far never a good explanataion. It usually starts with, "I
    >heard that trainers are bad for bikes".

    Ditto, I think the only harm from trainers is marring the skewers and occasionally gashing the paint
    on the chainstays when you're installing the bike in it.
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >I think this is a case of missing cause and effect. Trainers with less than about 8" diameter
    >rollers can damage tires and this is often misattributed to various unrelated effects. Flexing a
    >tire at a continuous high rate causes internal heating and tread delamination ala Ford Explorer.
    >Considering the length and curvature of the contact patch should make apparent how severe tire
    >casing flex is. I recall tubular tires coming apart while riding small diameter rollers along with
    >all the conjecture about the cause. This does not affect wheels nearly as much, load distribution
    >from the tire being broader.

    Good point, I don't usually consider the tire wear issue as I have always used garbage heavy gumwall
    tires on a trackstand style training and never worried too much about what happened to them, they
    definitely get wear rapidly.
     
  11. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    -regarding "trainers damage frames"-
    > On Thu, 6 Feb 2003 10:42:09 -0600, "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >What sort of strain?
    > >
    > >Could you compare/contrast with actual road impacts?
    > >
    > >I hear that comment a lot lately but so far never a good explanataion.
    It
    > >usually starts with, "I heard that trainers are bad for bikes". As
    someone
    > >who regularly aligns forks that have run headlong in to immobile objects
    and
    > >who straightens/replaces rims that have been bashed, I have yet to see similar impacts from
    > >trainers!!

    "Paul Kopit" <p.kopi[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm no engineer. On the road, when you stand and rock from side to side, the frame gives and the
    > spokes and wheels absorb strain.
    >
    > If just seems go be an unnecessary stress on the frame.

    I'm not either.

    I've been asking these questions for a while with no answers.

    My (unprofessional) impression is that you have no impact on the trainer and that's good. Less total
    force involved. And instead of loading through the axle to the rims, the side motion you mention is
    borne right at the axle by the trainer itself. If anything the rider's machinations would have even
    less effect on the frame in a trainer.

    So I can't envision a scenario where a bike gets damaged in a trainer, even though customers seem to
    accept that as gospel.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  12. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Mark Hickey wrote:

    > Even luckier I live where I don't ever THINK about riding a trainer... ;-)

    Don't gloat, it's bad karma. You may end up with an injury that keeps you on the trainer for
    weeks. :-(
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  13. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    Terry Morse <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Mark Hickey wrote:
    >
    >> Even luckier I live where I don't ever THINK about riding a trainer... ;-)
    >
    >Don't gloat, it's bad karma. You may end up with an injury that keeps you on the trainer for
    >weeks. :-(

    I'm already paid up on my karma account. Just getting back on the bike after a month and a half off
    with an achilles tendon injury. Luckily, that means I missed the "dead of winter" (aka "some of the
    nicest riding all year in Arizona"). ;-)

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  14. "Andrew Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My (unprofessional) impression is that you have no impact on the trainer and that's good. Less
    > total force involved. And instead of loading through the axle to the rims, the side motion you
    > mention is borne right at the axle by the trainer itself. If anything the rider's machinations
    > would have even less effect on the frame in a trainer.
    >
    > So I can't envision a scenario where a bike gets damaged in a trainer, even though customers seem
    > to accept that as gospel.

    Somebody mentioned strain on the wheels. I don't think that's actually the problem; if there is one,
    it's the chainstays. When you pedal, you torque the BB shell side to side (roll and yaw). On the
    road, some of this torque is tilting the bike, including the rear triangle, back and forth. On the
    trainer, the rear dropouts are fixed, so the force exerted on the BB is going into flexing the
    BB-chainstay triangle. It's as if you clamped the dropouts, put a bar through the BB shell, and
    started wiggling it back and forth.

    I haven't ever ridden a trainer enough to damage a frame, and maybe few people ever will. Somewhere
    on rec.bicycles.*, Andrew Coggan reported breaking a lightweight steel frame at the chainstay, on
    the trainer, but he rides the trainer a lot.
     
  15. Benjamin Weiner wrote:

    > I haven't ever ridden a trainer enough to damage a frame, and maybe few people ever will.
    > Somewhere on rec.bicycles.*, Andrew Coggan reported breaking a lightweight steel frame at the
    > chainstay, on the trainer, but he rides the trainer a lot.

    That brings to mind a serious and so-far intractable problem I've been having, I hope somebody can
    help. Here's the deal:

    Old fashioned trainers held the bike by the front fork and the chainstays just behind the bottom
    bracket. I didn't like these because I had to remove my kickstand to mount the bike on the trainer,
    and it felt funny to have the handlebars immobilized by the fork clamp--I like to pretend I'm riding
    my favorite trials course when I use my trainer, and the inability to steer ruins the illusion.

    Modern trainers generally grip the ends of the rear axle, steadying the bike, while allowing you to
    tun the handlebars. This also has the added benefit that it raises the rear while leaving the front
    wheel on the floor. Thus, not only can you steer as much as you want, but, unlike most road rides,
    it's downhill all the way!

    The big problem with this type of trainer (I'm sure I can't be the only one to have run into this
    difficult) is that the trainer attachment makes it impossible to attach my B.O.B. trailer! I like to
    schlep a couple of cinder blocks in the B.O.B. for extra resistance, so I get a better workout, but
    there just doesn't seem to be any modern-style trainer that will permit the attachment of the B.O.B.

    I've tried complaining to B.O.B. about this, but they've been no help. They act as if I'm some kind
    of nut, and put me on hold whenever I call.

    Surely there must be some sort of adaptor to make this work, but I'm stumped!

    Carapace Completed Umber Haines Junction, Yukon, Canada
    +------------------------------------------------------+
    | There are strange things done in the midnight sun, | by the men who moil for gold, | The Arctic
    | trails have their secret tales, | That would make your blood run cold... | --Robert Service |
    +------------------------------------------------------+
     
  16. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Sheldon Brown wrote:

    > That brings to mind a serious and so-far intractable problem I've been having, I hope somebody can
    > help. Here's the deal:

    Sheldon, you rascal. You now owe me one minute of my life back.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  17. Kevin Rook

    Kevin Rook Guest

    I think they are right....you ARE some kind of nut.

    Sheldon Brown wrote:

    > I've tried complaining to B.O.B. about this, but they've been no help. They act as if I'm some
    > kind of nut, and put me on hold whenever I call.
    >
    > Carapace Completed Umber
     
  18. Carapace Completed Umber <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Modern trainers generally grip the ends of the rear axle, steadying the bike, while allowing you
    > to tun the handlebars. This also has the added benefit that it raises the rear while leaving the
    > front wheel on the floor. Thus, not only can you steer as much as you want, but, unlike most road
    > rides, it's downhill all the way!

    You laugh, but somewhere in the bowels of r.b.racing archives there is a thread/flamefest about hill
    training by elevating the front of your rollers, or the stupidity of same.

    > The big problem with this type of trainer (I'm sure I can't be the only one to have run into this
    > difficult) is that the trainer attachment makes it impossible to attach my B.O.B. trailer! I like
    > to schlep a couple of cinder blocks in the B.O.B. for extra resistance, so I get a better
    > workout, but there just doesn't seem to be any modern-style trainer that will permit the
    > attachment of the B.O.B.
    >
    > I've tried complaining to B.O.B. about this, but they've been no help. They act as if I'm some
    > kind of nut, and put me on hold whenever I call.

    Duh. Sure, that works on the road, but it is completely different on the trainer. The rear axle is
    not going anywhere - to get the extra resistance you want, you need to clamp the B.O.B. to the axle
    of the _resistance unit_.

    B.O.B. know all about this, I think you've just been putting them off with your obscurantic phone
    attitude. Just call them back and ask for the Blackburn left-handed flywheel adaptor. Be sure
    to specify magnetic or wind trainer model. Do remember to install it with the skewer on the
    flywheel side, as otherwise the clamping force will oppose the trainer resistance, actually
    decreasing your workload. Additionally, the transverse torque about the skewer head could
    cause the trainer to tip over during a hard workout if installed backwards.

    > Surely there must be some sort of adaptor to make this work, but I'm stumped!
    >
    > Carapace Completed Umber Haines Junction, Yukon, Canada
     
  19. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    Sheldon Brown <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Old fashioned trainers held the bike by the front fork and the chainstays just behind the bottom
    > bracket. I didn't like these because I had to remove my kickstand to mount the bike on the
    > trainer, and it felt funny to have the handlebars immobilized by the fork clamp--I like to pretend
    > I'm riding my favorite trials course when I use my trainer, and the inability to steer ruins the
    > illusion.
    >
    > Modern trainers generally grip the ends of the rear axle, steadying the bike, while allowing you
    > to tun the handlebars. This also has the added benefit that it raises the rear while leaving the
    > front wheel on the floor. Thus, not only can you steer as much as you want, but, unlike most road
    > rides, it's downhill all the way!

    >
    > The big problem with this type of trainer (I'm sure I can't be the only one to have run into this
    > difficult) is that the trainer attachment makes it impossible to attach my B.O.B. trailer! I like
    > to schlep a couple of cinder blocks in the B.O.B. for extra resistance, so I get a better
    > workout, but there just doesn't seem to be any modern-style trainer that will permit the
    > attachment of the B.O.B.

    To increase your workout, take the cinderblocks out of the BOB and put them under your front wheel,
    so that you're riding *uphill* all the way.

    You can get the same effect on old-fashioned trainers by lowering the post that supports the BB. Or
    you could install a longer fork.

    Note: Ask your doctor for advice on how many cinderblocks to use when starting out, so you won't
    endanger your heart.

    Another possibility: tighten up the front brake cable, so that the brake shoe rubs against the wheel
    all the time. That will add lots of extra resistance. Make sure you use an old wheel, though, as
    it's hell on the rim finish.

    --
    Ray Heindl (remove the X to reply)
     
  20. On Fri, 07 Feb 2003 23:05:29 GMT, Sheldon Brown <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Surely there must be some sort of adaptor to make this work, but I'm stumped!

    In good capitalist fashion, I would suggest that perhaps this represents a market niche for the
    good folks at Harris Cyclery. With hard work, they might even have it ready for a roll out in,
    say, 50 days?

    Regards,

    George
    **********************************************************************
    Dr. George O. Bizzigotti Telephone: (703) 610-2115 Mitretek Systems, Inc. Fax: (703) 610-1558 3150
    Fairview Park Drive South E-Mail: [email protected] Falls Church, Virginia, 22042-4519
    **********************************************************************

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...