Swooping magpies

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by amirm, Sep 10, 2003.

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  1. amirm

    amirm New Member

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    Yesterday, the confounded birds got me three times.

    I took a spin to catch up with my weekly kms. On the route that I normally take for this purpose, I have been being swooped on two locations regularly. Yesterday, I took an extended version of the route and the third bird got me, too.

    After encountering these birds I can see that their swooping behaviour varies. One of them only comes close so I can hear him/her approaching, but never makes any contact. The second bird (different spot) always makes only one contact. It feels as if he/she kind of grabs on my jersy for a short time. No contacts with helmet. Since I do about 50-60 kmh on that part of the route, I guess one swoop is enough, and by then I have already left the territory!

    The bloody third one yesterday got me when I was doing like 30 kmh. This one kept bashing on my helmet. At least 6-7 times! It wouldn't let me go. Kept coming back for a good 300 meters. I got so angry I thought I would grab the bloody neck of the bird and snap the dumb head off, but I could only wish!
     
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  2. John Doe

    John Doe Guest

    The bloody third one yesterday got me when I was doing like 30 kmh. This
    : one kept bashing on my helmet. At least 6-7 times! It wouldn't let me go. Kept coming back for a
    : good 300 meters. I got so angry I thought I would grab the bloody neck of the bird and snap the
    : dumb head off, but I could only wish!
    :

    Yes you do feel like that at times but its not really their fault. Its their job and they didnt
    choose it. :)

    Pete
     
  3. Andy©

    Andy© Guest

    On 11 Sep 2003 08:42:09 +0950, amirm <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Yesterday, the confounded birds got me three times.
    >
    If you can manage to look at them, you`ll find they wont attack. They`ll only attack if youre not
    facing them. If it becomes really troublesome try sticking some paper cut eyes on the back of your
    helmet to simulate that youre looking at them. Regs Andy
     
  4. Jock

    Jock Guest

    Think how you would be feeling if your nuts had just grown 20 times larger. I reckon I'd be a little
    touchy as well and lash out here & there. The hat with eyes on the back is the go. They are cowards
    & won't attack you if they think you can see them. Jock "amirm" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Yesterday, the confounded birds got me three times.
    >
    > I took a spin to catch up with my weekly kms. On the route that I normally take for this purpose,
    > I have been being swooped on two locations regularly. Yesterday, I took an extended version of the
    > route and the third bird got me, too.
    >
    > After encountering these birds I can see that their swooping behaviour varies. One of them only
    > comes close so I can hear him/her approaching, but never makes any contact. The second bird
    > (different spot) always makes only one contact. It feels as if he/she kind of grabs on my jersy
    > for a short time. No contacts with helmet. Since I do about 50-60 kmh on that part of the route, I
    > guess one swoop is enough, and by then I have already left the territory!
    >
    > The bloody third one yesterday got me when I was doing like 30 kmh. This one kept bashing on my
    > helmet. At least 6-7 times! It wouldn't let me go. Kept coming back for a good 300 meters. I got
    > so angry I thought I would grab the bloody neck of the bird and snap the dumb head off, but I
    > could only wish!
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  5. "Andy©" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > If you can manage to look at them, you`ll find they wont attack. They`ll only attack if youre not
    > facing them. If it becomes really troublesome try sticking some paper cut eyes on the back of your
    > helmet to simulate that youre looking at them.

    There's a pair of magpies in Coffs Harbour that don'tknow about this rule!

    Cheers Peter
     
  6. I dont want to come across as cruel or evil, but ever since i saw my best mate get smashed hard in
    the head when we were 9 years old. from a dirty maggie. Ive had a chip on my shoulder. I always play
    baseball with them. remember, evolution with only happen if you change things. and by me, owning
    maggies when they swoop. they will evolve into non swooping bitches..

    "Jock" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Think how you would be feeling if your nuts had just grown 20 times
    larger.
    > I reckon I'd be a little touchy as well and lash out here & there. The hat with eyes on the back
    > is the go. They are cowards & won't attack you if they think you can see them. Jock "amirm"
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Yesterday, the confounded birds got me three times.
    > >
    > > I took a spin to catch up with my weekly kms. On the route that I normally take for this
    > > purpose, I have been being swooped on two locations regularly. Yesterday, I took an extended
    > > version of the route and the third bird got me, too.
    > >
    > > After encountering these birds I can see that their swooping behaviour varies. One of them only
    > > comes close so I can hear him/her approaching, but never makes any contact. The second bird
    > > (different spot) always makes only one contact. It feels as if he/she kind of grabs on my jersy
    > > for a short time. No contacts with helmet. Since I do about 50-60 kmh on that part of the route,
    > > I guess one swoop is enough, and by then I have already left the territory!
    > >
    > > The bloody third one yesterday got me when I was doing like 30 kmh. This one kept bashing on my
    > > helmet. At least 6-7 times! It wouldn't let me go. Kept coming back for a good 300 meters. I got
    > > so angry I thought I would grab the bloody neck of the bird and snap the dumb head off, but I
    > > could only wish!
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > --
    > > >--------------------------<
    > > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  7. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

    "Andy©" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > If you can manage to look at them, you`ll find they wont attack. They`ll only attack if youre not
    > facing them. If it becomes really troublesome try sticking some paper cut eyes on the back of your
    > helmet to simulate that youre looking at them.
    >
    That can be dangerous. I've seen a rider with a large scratch above his eyebrow done by a magpie. He
    explained that he'd done what you've suggested, putting fake eyes on the back of his helmet. This
    caused the bird to attack the front of his head under the impression it was the back.

    Nick
     
  8. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    > > >
    > > > I took a spin to catch up with my weekly kms. On the route that I normally take for this
    > > > purpose, I have been being swooped on two locations regularly. Yesterday, I took an extended
    > > > version of the route and the third bird got me, too.
    > > >
    > > > After encountering these birds I can see that their swooping behaviour varies. One of them
    > > > only comes close so I can hear him/her approaching, but never makes any contact. The second
    > > > bird (different spot) always makes only one contact. It feels as if he/she kind of grabs on my
    > > > jersy for a short time. No contacts with helmet. Since I do about 50-60 kmh on that part of
    > > > the route, I guess one swoop is enough, and by then I have already left the territory!
    > > >
    > > > The bloody third one yesterday got me when I was doing like 30 kmh. This one kept bashing on
    > > > my helmet. At least 6-7 times! It wouldn't let me go. Kept coming back for a good 300 meters.
    > > > I got so angry I thought I would grab the bloody neck of the bird and snap the dumb head off,
    > > > but I could only wish!
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > >--------------------------<
    > > > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
    > >
    >Last Saturday I was the victim of a swooping. We parked under the
    maggies tree, so can't complain when we got swooped. So I thought that by leaving its area it would
    leave me alone. I was wrong when I jumped on my bike and took off I was hit about 5 times on the
    helmet. On approach for the sixth time I took my eyes of the road to see it approach, hit a rock and
    came off spectacularly. My mates thought it was hilarious! Whilst on the grounded winded the bloody
    bird kept swooping me (not making contact though). I was now a good 100 meters from its tree!

    Don't know why but there were a group of people under the tree when we arrived and they were not
    getting attacked and as we drove off it sat in the tree and still didn't swoop them.
     
  9. Paul J

    Paul J New Member

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    I thought Magpies would be a pretty good training aid. You have to sprint to get through the attack zone and possibly if you're going fast enough the bird won't keep up.

    But honestly, magpies a menace and a dangerous threat to all cyclists. Cyclists are the most vulnerable when it comes to magpies and none of the old wives remedies appear to have any effect. I think magpies actually target cyclists over any other group as they do appear very odd and vulnerable and therefore weaker.

    I pity those poor souls who actually have no choice but to ride on their own through magpie territory. I personally have decided only to go on bunch rides until the season is over. Safety in numbers right? But even this does not seem to deter these birds.

    One thing I do believe is that these birds are approaching plague proportions in our suburbs. I believe it is because generation after generation are being hand fed around the clock by well meaning suburbanites instead of the population being cut back by environmental factors during leaner times. With more and more birds reaching maturity, their individual territories are beginning get crowded and they're becoming more aggressive
     
  10. "Jock" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Think how you would be feeling if your nuts had just grown 20 times
    larger.
    > I reckon I'd be a little touchy as well and lash out here & there. The hat with eyes on the back
    > is the go. They are cowards & won't attack you if they think you can see them. Jock

    I rode through a new housing estate at Edens Landing about four years ago in September (or nesting
    season anyway) and there were several swooping magpies that got me cornered on an uphill. I got off
    my bike and they were confronting me. I recall at least one was landing on the ground and kept
    trying to fly up behind me, so I had to spin around and keep it in front of
    me. After a minute or so I just had to ride away waving my one arm in the air.
     
  11. Sigi Goode

    Sigi Goode Guest

    On 12 Sep 2003 13:34:08 +0950, Paul J <[email protected].com> wrote:

    >But honestly, magpies a menace and a dangerous threat to all cyclists. Cyclists are the most
    >vulnerable when it comes to magpies

    What, more vulnerable than pedestrians? If so, why not just get off the bike and walk? Are you
    thinking about this, Paul?

    > and none of the old wives remedies appear to have any effect.

    The eyes I painted on the back of my helmet would disagree with this...

    >I think magpies actually target cyclists over any other group as they do appear very odd and
    >vulnerable and therefore weaker.

    Oh Paul, why in blazes would a magpie only seek to attack things which are WEAK? These birds are
    trying to defend their nest and their young. Weak foes would pose no threat to their young. You are
    in their territory, pure and simple.

    As much as I dislike being swooped, I admire their courage!

    Sg.
     
  12. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    Laurence Dodd wrote:
    >
    > I rode through a new housing estate at Edens Landing about four years ago in September (or nesting
    > season anyway) and there were several swooping magpies that got me cornered on an uphill. I got
    > off my bike and they were confronting me. I recall at least one was landing on the ground and kept
    > trying to fly up behind me, so I had to spin around and keep it in front of
    > me. After a minute or so I just had to ride away waving my one arm in the air.
    >

    You only have one arm?

    &roo
     
  13. Andre S .

    Andre S . Guest

    I was swooped by a persistant maggie riding last Sunday, the impacts were unusually gentle - "Soft
    and Fluffy"!

    Even when walking, I make a point of not looking for magpies. I figure its one way to antagonise
    them, seem to get swooped less.

    AndreS.au ===> I ride therefore I am
     
  14. Dj

    Dj Guest

    Maybe there is some kind of conspiracy going on between the magpies and aus.car..they all hate
    cyclists lol

    "Jeff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > > I took a spin to catch up with my weekly kms. On the route that I normally take for this
    > > > > purpose, I have been being swooped on two locations regularly. Yesterday, I took an extended
    > > > > version of the
    route
    > > > > and the third bird got me, too.
    > > > >
    > > > > After encountering these birds I can see that their swooping
    behaviour
    > > > > varies. One of them only comes close so I can hear him/her
    approaching,
    > > > > but never makes any contact. The second bird (different spot) always makes only one contact.
    > > > > It feels as if he/she kind of grabs on my
    jersy
    > > > > for a short time. No contacts with helmet. Since I do about 50-60
    kmh on
    > > > > that part of the route, I guess one swoop is enough, and by then I
    have
    > > > > already left the territory!
    > > > >
    > > > > The bloody third one yesterday got me when I was doing like 30 kmh.
    This
    > > > > one kept bashing on my helmet. At least 6-7 times! It wouldn't let
    me
    > > > > go. Kept coming back for a good 300 meters. I got so angry I thought
    I
    > > > > would grab the bloody neck of the bird and snap the dumb head off,
    but I
    > > > > could only wish!
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > --
    > > > > >--------------------------<
    > > > > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
    > > >
    > >Last Saturday I was the victim of a swooping. We parked under the
    > maggies tree, so can't complain when we got swooped. So I thought that by leaving its area it
    > would leave me alone. I was wrong when I jumped on my bike and took off I was hit about 5 times
    > on the helmet. On approach for the sixth time I took my eyes of the road to see it approach, hit
    > a rock and came off spectacularly. My mates thought it was hilarious! Whilst on the grounded
    > winded the bloody bird kept swooping me (not making contact though). I was now a good 100 meters
    > from its tree!
    >
    > Don't know why but there were a group of people under the tree when we arrived and they were not
    > getting attacked and as we drove off it sat in the tree and still didn't swoop them.
     
  15. No, I have two arms. The last sentence in my previous post should not have included the word "my".

    LD.

    "Andrew Swan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Laurence Dodd wrote:
    > >
    > > I rode through a new housing estate at Edens Landing about four years
    ago in
    > > September (or nesting season anyway) and there were several swooping
    magpies
    > > that got me cornered on an uphill. I got off my bike and they were confronting me. I recall at
    > > least one was landing on the ground and
    kept
    > > trying to fly up behind me, so I had to spin around and keep it in front
    of
    > > me. After a minute or so I just had to ride away waving my one arm in
    the
    > > air.
    > >
    >
    > You only have one arm?
    >
    > &roo
     
  16. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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  17. Paul J

    Paul J New Member

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    >Yes, there is another conspiracy.

    >Dr Hugh Wirth, the ever tactful leader of the RSPCA, got stuck >into a ABC radio talkback caller on the 6/9, who had the sheer >nerve to mention he was a cyclist & had probs with magpies.

    >Dr Hugh responded that he disliked cyclists & sided with the >birds. Sounds very shifty to me. Draw you own conclusions.

    >BTW, anyone ever encountered problems with plovers? nasty >little sods too. [/B][/QUOTE]

    I've never heard of cyclists being attacked by plovers and I've regularly riden through plover territory without problems but yes these birds are worse than magpies. Even though I've been attacked by magpies I still have more respect for them because plovers are just so damn stupid.

    However, I wonder how long it will be before someone turns around and sues National Parks and Wildlife and the RSPCA after losing an eye to a magpie.
     
  18. "cfsmtb" wrote:

    > BTW, anyone ever encountered problems with plovers? nasty little sods too.

    Absolutely - great little divebombers. I knew them as "spurwing plovers" when I was a kid in
    Brisbane. They seem to be known as "lapwings" these days.

    They have sharp spurs on the leading edges of the wings. But at least they're vocal, and let you
    know they're upset - unlike magpies, which are into stealth attacks.

    All these birds are protected, and noone would ever think of harming them! So when you get off your
    bike and stand with a stick in one hand and the sun behind you (watching your shadow), you must be
    careful not to raise the stick quickly at the wrong time. Otherwise you might accidentally connect
    with one of the precious little darlings.

    John
     
  19. Paul Jones

    Paul Jones Guest

    I remember refereeing a game of touch footy in plover territory.

    This little bird spent the whole game divebombing everyone - he just didnt give up!

    One of the funniest things I have seen on a footy field

    Paul

    Paul J wrote:

    > >Yes, there is another conspiracy.
    >
    > >Dr Hugh Wirth, the ever tactful leader of the RSPCA, got stuck >into a ABC radio talkback caller
    > >on the 6/9, who had the sheer >nerve to mention he was a cyclist & had probs with magpies.
    >
    > >Dr Hugh responded that he disliked cyclists & sided with the >birds. Sounds very shifty to me.
    > >Draw you own conclusions.
    >
    > >BTW, anyone ever encountered problems with plovers? nasty >little sods too.
    >
    > I've never heard of cyclists being attacked by plovers and I've regularly riden through plover
    > territory without problems but yes these birds are worse than magpies. Even though I've been
    > attacked by magpies I still have more respect for them because plovers are just so damn stupid.
    >
    > However, I wonder how long it will be before someone turns around and sues National Parks and
    > Wildlife and the RSPCA after losing an eye to a magpie.
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  20. Tom N

    Tom N Guest

    A guy was killed recently by a magpie striking his eye.

    See e.g. http://tinyurl.com/njf1 which is
    http://www.heraldsun.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5478,7171577%255E2862,00.html

    What techniques work depends on the individual magpie. In the case of the above magpie, a shotgun is
    appropriate.

    I try to give magpies plenty of space at all times, hopefully that helps them stay calm and be
    human-friendly in the future.

    http://tinyurl.com/njg2 (which is
    http://www.thecouriermail.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,7238628%255E3102,00.html ) says...
    Bird expert Dr Peter Mather, from Queensland University of Technology, said the traditional view of
    why magpies attacked was they had past problems with humans and long memories. Dr Mather said the
    birds lived 20 to 25 years and might brand all humans as threats, like goannas, after a single act
    of aggression. "While it hasn't been 100 per cent demonstrated, there is certainly evidence that
    magpies are not usually aggressive until someone interferes with their young," Dr Mather said.

    I am thinking of putting my little dog (7kg) on the bike rack - but I am not sure if that would
    entice them more or less.

    Anyone tried one of those legionairres hats (cloth flapping around behind your head) under your
    helmet, or a bike flag?

    "amirm" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected].net.au...
    > Yesterday, the confounded birds got me three times.
    >
    > I took a spin to catch up with my weekly kms. On the route that I normally take for this purpose,
    > I have been being swooped on two locations regularly. Yesterday, I took an extended version of the
    > route and the third bird got me, too.
    >
    > After encountering these birds I can see that their swooping behaviour varies. One of them only
    > comes close so I can hear him/her approaching, but never makes any contact. The second bird
    > (different spot) always makes only one contact. It feels as if he/she kind of grabs on my jersy
    > for a short time. No contacts with helmet. Since I do about 50-60 kmh on that part of the route, I
    > guess one swoop is enough, and by then I have already left the territory!
    >
    > The bloody third one yesterday got me when I was doing like 30 kmh. This one kept bashing on my
    > helmet. At least 6-7 times! It wouldn't let me go. Kept coming back for a good 300 meters. I got
    > so angry I thought I would grab the bloody neck of the bird and snap the dumb head off, but I
    > could only wish!
     
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