Target Heart Rate question

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Kevin, Feb 12, 2004.

  1. Kevin

    Kevin Guest

    OK, last question for the day. :) According to the info I've read, my maximum target heart rate
    (85%) is 162 bpm. I reached this number because the chart at the gym says for my age group (28),
    the maximum target heart rate for the most effective range is 85%, which is 27 beats per 10
    seconds, or 162 bpm.

    I own a heart rate monitor, and used it for the first time the other night. As I ran, I found that
    my heart rate was constantly in the range of 175 - 185 bpm. When it rose to 190 bpm, I slowed down
    to a brisk walking pace for a minute or so, then stepped the pace back up.

    Now, my problem is that I used to run quite frequently up until a year ago, then ran infrequently
    for a year, and am just now trying to get back into a regular routine. In the past, I never
    monitored my heart rate. I just ran a 5K as fast as I could, at a constant pace. My times were
    typically around 25 minutes.

    Is it possible that when I was doing this 3 times a week, I was shortchanging myself by keeping my
    heart rate so high? Or is it OK? Is 185 bpm an acceptable heart rate for me to maintain for a half-
    hour run, or am I over-extending myself?

    Any advice from heart-rate experts here? Thanks,

    Kevin.
     
    Tags:


  2. Garyg

    Garyg Guest

    "Kevin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > OK, last question for the day. :) According to the info I've read, my maximum target heart rate
    > (85%) is 162 bpm. I reached this number because the chart at the gym says for my age group (28),
    > the maximum target heart rate for the most effective range is 85%, which is 27 beats per 10
    > seconds, or 162 bpm.
    >
    > I own a heart rate monitor, and used it for the first time the other night. As I ran, I found that
    > my heart rate was constantly in the range of 175 - 185 bpm. When it rose to 190 bpm, I slowed down
    > to a brisk walking pace for a minute or so, then stepped the pace back up.
    >
    > Now, my problem is that I used to run quite frequently up until a year ago, then ran infrequently
    > for a year, and am just now trying to get back into a regular routine. In the past, I never
    > monitored my heart rate. I just ran a 5K as fast as I could, at a constant pace. My times were
    > typically around 25 minutes.
    >
    > Is it possible that when I was doing this 3 times a week, I was shortchanging myself by keeping my
    > heart rate so high? Or is it OK? Is 185 bpm an acceptable heart rate for me to maintain for a half-
    > hour run, or am I over-extending myself?
    >
    > Any advice from heart-rate experts here? Thanks,
    >
    > Kevin.

    "Max" heart rate cannot be reliably ascertained from a formula. Many people find that their true max
    is higher or lower than the formulas suggest. And, the max is different for different sports
    (running usually has the highest max, followed by cycling and swimming).

    It sounds like your max may be higher than the formula. I suggest you experiment with it and see. In
    general, for performance you want to do interval work to train near your max, and lower intensity
    work to improve aerobic capacity and for recovery. At your age, you can do more intense training,
    because you will recover faster. Just be careful not to increase distance or intensity too fast, to
    allow your body time to adapt.

    If you're working to improve performance, you're really interested in LTHR (lactate threshold heart
    rate). This is basically the highest heart rate you can maintain for 20-30 minutes or so. Unlike
    your Max, which is pretty much fixed and can't be raised, LTHR can be raised by training. By doing
    so, you generally go faster.

    You might want to check out some of these books:

    The Beginning Runner's Handbook http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1550548611/qid%3D1075085610/sr%3D1-6/002-
    6128030-1850430

    The Runner's Handbook http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0140469303/qid%3D1075085610/sr%3D1-3/002-
    6128030-1850430

    Galloway's Book on Running, 2nd Edition http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0936070277/qid%3D1075085610/sr%3D1-7/002-
    6128030-1850430

    Hope this helps.

    --
    ~_-* ...G/ \G http://www.CycliStats.com CycliStats - Software for Cyclists

    Coming Soon - StrideWare - Software for Runners and Walkers
     
  3. Indranil

    Indranil Guest

    "GaryG" <[email protected]_SPAMBEGONE_software.com> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Kevin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > OK, last question for the day. :) According to the info I've read, my maximum target heart rate
    > > (85%) is 162 bpm. I reached this number because the chart at the gym says for my age group (28),
    > > the maximum target heart rate for the most effective range is 85%, which is 27 beats per 10
    > > seconds, or 162 bpm.
    > >
    > > I own a heart rate monitor, and used it for the first time the other night. As I ran, I found
    > > that my heart rate was constantly in the range of 175 - 185 bpm. When it rose to 190 bpm, I
    > > slowed down to a brisk walking pace for a minute or so, then stepped the pace back up.
    > >
    > > Now, my problem is that I used to run quite frequently up until a year ago, then ran
    > > infrequently for a year, and am just now trying to get back into a regular routine. In the past,
    > > I never monitored my heart rate. I just ran a 5K as fast as I could, at a constant pace. My
    > > times were typically around 25 minutes.
    > >
    > > Is it possible that when I was doing this 3 times a week, I was shortchanging myself by keeping
    > > my heart rate so high? Or is it OK? Is 185 bpm an acceptable heart rate for me to maintain for a
    > > half-hour run, or am I over-extending myself?
    > >
    > > Any advice from heart-rate experts here? Thanks,
    > >
    > > Kevin.
    >
    > "Max" heart rate cannot be reliably ascertained from a formula. Many people find that their true
    > max is higher or lower than the formulas suggest. And, the max is different for different sports
    > (running usually has the highest max, followed by cycling and swimming).
    >
    > It sounds like your max may be higher than the formula. I suggest you experiment with it and see.
    > In general, for performance you want to do interval work to train near your max, and lower
    > intensity work to improve aerobic capacity and for recovery. At your age, you can do more intense
    > training, because you will recover faster. Just be careful not to increase distance or intensity
    > too fast, to allow your body time to adapt.
    >
    > If you're working to improve performance, you're really interested in LTHR (lactate threshold
    > heart rate). This is basically the highest heart rate you can maintain for 20-30 minutes or so.
    > Unlike your Max, which is pretty much fixed and can't be raised, LTHR can be raised by training.
    > By doing so, you generally go faster.
    >
    > You might want to check out some of these books:
    >
    > The Beginning Runner's Handbook http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1550548611/qid%3D1075085610/sr%3D1-6/002-
    > 6128030-1850430
    >
    > The Runner's Handbook http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0140469303/qid%3D1075085610/sr%3D1-3/002-
    > 6128030-1850430
    >
    > Galloway's Book on Running, 2nd Edition http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0936070277/qid%3D1075085610/sr%3D1-7/002-
    > 6128030-1850430
    >
    > Hope this helps.

    Hi This is Indranil , was just reading ur thread, would like to know more about LTHR(lactate
    threshold heart rate). If anybody can help me out on this

    regards
     
  4. Joe User

    Joe User Guest

    "GaryG" <[email protected]_SPAMBEGONE_software.com> wrote:
    > the max [heart rate] is different for different sports (running usually has the highest max,
    > followed by cycling and swimming).

    I disagree. You are confusing the term "max HR" with the term "peak HR". Each individual has a "max
    HR", and that is his/her MHR regardless of activity.

    But it is true that for some activities, it is easier for a fit person to achieve 80-90% MHR --
    their anaerobic (lactate) threshold. This is because the activity involves more large muscle groups.

    However, that does not mean that a person -- especially an unfit person -- cannot achieve that level
    with other activities. Even a fit cyclist can achieve that intensity when pedaling at a fast cadence
    in very high gears on level ground and when going up a steep incline.
     
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