Taxonomy of cycling shoes and pedals?



I returned to cycling two years ago and was persuaded to buy a pair of
cycling shoes. In the shop I replied 'yes' to the question, 'will you
require to walk in them'. They have studs not unlike football boots
and a recessed cleat; Diadora brand.

Looking at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycling_shoe and elsewhere, it
seems they are what is called 'mountain bike shoes'.

It could be that the pedal type and shoe are SPD?

When looking at cycling shoes in websites (e.g. Wiggle), and I suppose
pedals too, the types are not clear to me.

Are there just two types of cycling shoe in common use?

Pros and cons --- for a road bike?

TIA,

Jon C.
 
N

naked_draughtsman

Guest
On Jul 13, 2:43 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> I returned to cycling two years ago and was persuaded to buy a pair of
> cycling shoes. In the shop I replied 'yes' to the question, 'will you
> require to walk in them'. They have studs not unlike football boots
> and a recessed cleat; Diadora brand.
>
> Looking athttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycling_shoeand elsewhere, it
> seems they are what is called 'mountain bike shoes'.
>
> It could be that the pedal type and shoe are SPD?
>
> When looking at cycling shoes in websites (e.g. Wiggle), and I suppose
> pedals too, the types are not clear to me.
>
> Are there just two types of cycling shoe in common use?
>
> Pros and cons --- for a road bike?


I think your bike shop has been trying to sell you the same pair that
I have - mine cost £45 and were 'cheap'. I think most 'MTB' shoes
have holes for 2 screws to attach a small cleat inside a recess
whereas road ones are larger and take 3 screws?
Even with a recess for the cleat, it still clicks on the ground as you
walk and it's not perfect but better than no recess I would imagine.

peter
 
O

Orienteer

Guest
"naked_draughtsman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
On Jul 13, 2:43 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> I returned to cycling two years ago and was persuaded to buy a pair of
> cycling shoes. In the shop I replied 'yes' to the question, 'will you
> require to walk in them'. They have studs not unlike football boots
> and a recessed cleat; Diadora brand.
>
> Looking athttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycling_shoeand elsewhere, it
> seems they are what is called 'mountain bike shoes'.
>
> It could be that the pedal type and shoe are SPD?
>
> When looking at cycling shoes in websites (e.g. Wiggle), and I suppose
> pedals too, the types are not clear to me.
>
> Are there just two types of cycling shoe in common use?
>
> Pros and cons --- for a road bike?


It is possible to find "touring" shoes, midway between road (very stiff and
unsuitable for walking) and MTB shoes (heavy). I have Specialized Sonoma
shoes, about 50 squid.
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (' [email protected]') wrote:

> I returned to cycling two years ago and was persuaded to buy a pair of
> cycling shoes. In the shop I replied 'yes' to the question, 'will you
> require to walk in them'. They have studs not unlike football boots
> and a recessed cleat; Diadora brand.
>
> Looking at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycling_shoe and elsewhere, it
> seems they are what is called 'mountain bike shoes'.
>
> It could be that the pedal type and shoe are SPD?
>
> When looking at cycling shoes in websites (e.g. Wiggle), and I suppose
> pedals too, the types are not clear to me.
>
> Are there just two types of cycling shoe in common use?


There are two /main/ types in common use. The original Shimano SPD system -
now marketed mainly as a mountain bike system, but actually better for
utility bikes - uses two bolts side by side. This bolt pattern is shared
by almost all the real mountain bike pedal systems such as egg-beaters and
ATACs. I'm not sure what bolt pattern Speedplay use, but I imagine it's
the same.

The other main type is the Look delta three bolt pattern, now used by most
road-oriented cleat systems, including Look, Time, Campagnolo, Keywin,
Shimano SPD SL, and others. The three bolts form an arrowhead pointing
forwards. But Shimano's SPD-R road system uses a completely different
pattern.

Three bolt cleats are all much bigger than two bolt cleats. They spread the
pedalling load over a wider area of your foot and are consequently less
likely to cause hot-spots and other pressure discomfort. They're the
system to choose if you regularly ride long distances.

In general, three-bolt cleats are not designed to be walked on. Shoes
designed for three-bolt cleats often have extremely stiff, smooth and
slippy soles. If you regularly need to walk even a few yards off the bike
with your cycling shoes on, you're probably better off with a two-bolt
system.

Shoes designed for the two-bolt side-by-side systems typically are designed
to be walked in. The cleat is much smaller and can be recessed into the
sole. Some of these shoes are designed for mountain biking and have studs
or tread patterns designed to grip on mud and wet rock, but others are
more discreet and won't look out of place in any informal situation. I
don't know of any cycling shoe that you could comfortably wear into a
formal business meeting, however, which is a shame. Anyone?

Personally I use Look Keos (three bolt) on my 'good' road bike, and Time
ATACs (two bolt) on my mountain bikes and on my old road bike.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; All in all you're just another hick in the mall
-- Drink C'lloid
 
M

Mark

Guest
<some snippage>

> I returned to cycling two years ago and was persuaded to buy a pair of
> cycling shoes. In the shop I replied 'yes' to the question, 'will you
> require to walk in them'. They have studs not unlike football boots
> and a recessed cleat; Diadora brand.


> It could be that the pedal type and shoe are SPD?


> Pros and cons --- for a road bike?


Given that you wouldn't want to walk very far/at all with 'road' shoes,
you've made the right choice of cleat. Road shoes have a smooth sole with
the cleat standing well proud, which makes walking interesting to say the
least (not only do you bugger the cleat up, but you keep slipping on smooth
surfaces 'cos only the heel and cleat touch the floor).

Road cleats provide a larger, arguably more secure, platform that aids in
silly-crazy all out sprinting. This in no way compensates for the fact
that you will go **** over *** on smooth floors unless you're very careful
or that you'll wreck the cleat after even a modest amount of walking.