TC over 300 and clean arteries!

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by M. Schwartz, Aug 18, 2003.

  1. M. Schwartz

    M. Schwartz Guest

    Dr. Paul G. Donohue writes a syndicated column that I read in a local
    newspaper. One of the questions today came from a guy who along with
    his wife had an electron-beam tomography to detect plaque buildup in
    coronary arteries. He was amazed that with a TC level of 184 he had
    significant buildup of plaque while his wife with a TC over 300 was
    free of plaque buildup. He asked Dr. Donohue how that could be
    possible. Dr. Donohue replied "there are forces other than cholesterol
    responsible for clogging arteries." He went on to suggest that had
    this guy's TC been higher he could have had a heart attack.

    Well, here I was feeling secure with a TC of 133 and LDL of just 81
    and now I wonder what "other forces" are killing me.

    By the way, anyone know about this electron-beam tomography?

    Mel
     
    Tags:


  2. "M. Schwartz" wrote:

    > Dr. Paul G. Donohue writes a syndicated column that I read in a local
    > newspaper. One of the questions today came from a guy who along with
    > his wife had an electron-beam tomography to detect plaque buildup in
    > coronary arteries. He was amazed that with a TC level of 184 he had
    > significant buildup of plaque while his wife with a TC over 300 was
    > free of plaque buildup. He asked Dr. Donohue how that could be
    > possible. Dr. Donohue replied "there are forces other than cholesterol
    > responsible for clogging arteries." He went on to suggest that had
    > this guy's TC been higher he could have had a heart attack.
    >
    > Well, here I was feeling secure with a TC of 133 and LDL of just 81
    > and now I wonder what "other forces" are killing me.
    >
    > By the way, anyone know about this electron-beam tomography?
    >


    Yes. It is an imperfect test that is known to miss lipid-rich
    atherosclerotic plaques which may contain very little calcium deposits and
    yet be just as prone (if not more prone) to rupture thereby causing a
    heart attack.

    The wife with TC of 300 mg/dl is not free of atherosclerosis on the basis
    of a "negative" EBCT.

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/
     
  3. On 18 Aug 2003 11:44:10 -0700, [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote:

    >Dr. Paul G. Donohue writes a syndicated column that I read in a local
    >newspaper. One of the questions today came from a guy who along with
    >his wife had an electron-beam tomography to detect plaque buildup in
    >coronary arteries. He was amazed that with a TC level of 184 he had
    >significant buildup of plaque while his wife with a TC over 300 was
    >free of plaque buildup. He asked Dr. Donohue how that could be
    >possible. Dr. Donohue replied "there are forces other than cholesterol
    >responsible for clogging arteries." He went on to suggest that had
    >this guy's TC been higher he could have had a heart attack.
    >
    >Well, here I was feeling secure with a TC of 133 and LDL of just 81
    >and now I wonder what "other forces" are killing me.




    >By the way, anyone know about this electron-beam tomography?
    >
    >Mel


    I had one back in 1995 when it was first being used. Now, clinics
    where you can have this done are poping up faster than Starbucks. They
    even do full-body scans.

    It does have its limitations, being a static test (as opposed to, say,
    a stress-echo) and I question their usefulness.
     
  4. Mel,

    Two more factors besides chol, CRP and Hba1c do a better job than TC
    in prediction CHD. As you know, the TC/ HDL ratio does a better job
    than TC also. The electron-beam tomography isn't recommended because
    it may prompt unneccessary procedures. Also, the jury may be still
    out about how valid it is. I just read in the Framington study a chol
    below 160 predicts a very low risk of CHD - you should be fine if you
    don't worry too much!

    [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Dr. Paul G. Donohue writes a syndicated column that I read in a local
    > newspaper. One of the questions today came from a guy who along with
    > his wife had an electron-beam tomography to detect plaque buildup in
    > coronary arteries. He was amazed that with a TC level of 184 he had
    > significant buildup of plaque while his wife with a TC over 300 was
    > free of plaque buildup. He asked Dr. Donohue how that could be
    > possible. Dr. Donohue replied "there are forces other than cholesterol
    > responsible for clogging arteries." He went on to suggest that had
    > this guy's TC been higher he could have had a heart attack.
    >
    > Well, here I was feeling secure with a TC of 133 and LDL of just 81
    > and now I wonder what "other forces" are killing me.
    >
    > By the way, anyone know about this electron-beam tomography?
    >
    > Mel
     
  5. Mel,

    Here's a risk calculator from the NIH:
    http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov/atpiii/calculator.asp?usertype=pub My risk
    came to 2% for CHD in the next ten years. http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov
    has a lot of good info.

    [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Mel,
    > >
    > > Two more factors besides chol, CRP and Hba1c do a better job than TC
    > > in prediction CHD. As you know, the TC/ HDL ratio does a better job
    > > than TC also. The electron-beam tomography isn't recommended because
    > > it may prompt unneccessary procedures. Also, the jury may be still
    > > out about how valid it is. I just read in the Framington study a chol
    > > below 160 predicts a very low risk of CHD - you should be fine if you
    > > don't worry too much!

    >
    > Look who's talking. Your the guy with a great HDL of 68 and worrying
    > what to take to replace your Lipitor. :)
    >
    > Brad, I already have CHD. I had a bypass in 1998 and that means I am
    > considered to have CHD. What I need is a study to show a TC lower than
    > 160 predicts my narrow grafts will last 50 years. :)
    >
    > Mel
    >
    > >
    > > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > Dr. Paul G. Donohue writes a syndicated column that I read in a local
    > > > newspaper. One of the questions today came from a guy who along with
    > > > his wife had an electron-beam tomography to detect plaque buildup in
    > > > coronary arteries. He was amazed that with a TC level of 184 he had
    > > > significant buildup of plaque while his wife with a TC over 300 was
    > > > free of plaque buildup. He asked Dr. Donohue how that could be
    > > > possible. Dr. Donohue replied "there are forces other than cholesterol
    > > > responsible for clogging arteries." He went on to suggest that had
    > > > this guy's TC been higher he could have had a heart attack.
    > > >
    > > > Well, here I was feeling secure with a TC of 133 and LDL of just 81
    > > > and now I wonder what "other forces" are killing me.
    > > >
    > > > By the way, anyone know about this electron-beam tomography?
    > > >
    > > > Mel
     
  6. M. Schwartz

    M. Schwartz Guest

    [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    Brad, why should I worry about the risk when I already have it? The
    bypass in 1998 makes me a statistical CHD person. The only thing I
    have to do now is keep my narrow grafts clean as long as possible.

    Mel, not worried, just being cautious. :)


    > Mel,
    >
    > Here's a risk calculator from the NIH:
    > http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov/atpiii/calculator.asp?usertype=pub My risk
    > came to 2% for CHD in the next ten years. http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov
    > has a lot of good info.
    >
    > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > Mel,
    > > >
    > > > Two more factors besides chol, CRP and Hba1c do a better job than TC
    > > > in prediction CHD. As you know, the TC/ HDL ratio does a better job
    > > > than TC also. The electron-beam tomography isn't recommended because
    > > > it may prompt unneccessary procedures. Also, the jury may be still
    > > > out about how valid it is. I just read in the Framington study a chol
    > > > below 160 predicts a very low risk of CHD - you should be fine if you
    > > > don't worry too much!

    > >
    > > Look who's talking. Your the guy with a great HDL of 68 and worrying
    > > what to take to replace your Lipitor. :)
    > >
    > > Brad, I already have CHD. I had a bypass in 1998 and that means I am
    > > considered to have CHD. What I need is a study to show a TC lower than
    > > 160 predicts my narrow grafts will last 50 years. :)
    > >
    > > Mel
    > >
    > > >
    > > > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > Dr. Paul G. Donohue writes a syndicated column that I read in a local
    > > > > newspaper. One of the questions today came from a guy who along with
    > > > > his wife had an electron-beam tomography to detect plaque buildup in
    > > > > coronary arteries. He was amazed that with a TC level of 184 he had
    > > > > significant buildup of plaque while his wife with a TC over 300 was
    > > > > free of plaque buildup. He asked Dr. Donohue how that could be
    > > > > possible. Dr. Donohue replied "there are forces other than cholesterol
    > > > > responsible for clogging arteries." He went on to suggest that had
    > > > > this guy's TC been higher he could have had a heart attack.
    > > > >
    > > > > Well, here I was feeling secure with a TC of 133 and LDL of just 81
    > > > > and now I wonder what "other forces" are killing me.
    > > > >
    > > > > By the way, anyone know about this electron-beam tomography?
    > > > >
    > > > > Mel
     
  7. The question is your odds of a coronary event. Mel, if I were in your
    shoes I'd try to increase my (low) HDL. How? 1) eat up to 40% fat by
    eating more nuts, oily fish, and olive oil. 2) exercise more (if your
    doc allows) 3 consider Niaspan and a drink a day. Here's an
    encouraging site about actually reversing blockages:
    http://www.niaspan.com/templates/hcp.asp?class=2&page=2
    Disclaimer: I mean well but am not a doctor or expert.

    [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > Brad, why should I worry about the risk when I already have it? The
    > bypass in 1998 makes me a statistical CHD person. The only thing I
    > have to do now is keep my narrow grafts clean as long as possible.
    >
    > Mel, not worried, just being cautious. :)
    >
    >
    > > Mel,
    > >
    > > Here's a risk calculator from the NIH:
    > > http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov/atpiii/calculator.asp?usertype=pub My risk
    > > came to 2% for CHD in the next ten years. http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov
    > > has a lot of good info.
    > >
    > > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > Mel,
    > > > >
    > > > > Two more factors besides chol, CRP and Hba1c do a better job than TC
    > > > > in prediction CHD. As you know, the TC/ HDL ratio does a better job
    > > > > than TC also. The electron-beam tomography isn't recommended because
    > > > > it may prompt unneccessary procedures. Also, the jury may be still
    > > > > out about how valid it is. I just read in the Framington study a chol
    > > > > below 160 predicts a very low risk of CHD - you should be fine if you
    > > > > don't worry too much!
    > > >
    > > > Look who's talking. Your the guy with a great HDL of 68 and worrying
    > > > what to take to replace your Lipitor. :)
    > > >
    > > > Brad, I already have CHD. I had a bypass in 1998 and that means I am
    > > > considered to have CHD. What I need is a study to show a TC lower than
    > > > 160 predicts my narrow grafts will last 50 years. :)
    > > >
    > > > Mel
    > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > > Dr. Paul G. Donohue writes a syndicated column that I read in a local
    > > > > > newspaper. One of the questions today came from a guy who along with
    > > > > > his wife had an electron-beam tomography to detect plaque buildup in
    > > > > > coronary arteries. He was amazed that with a TC level of 184 he had
    > > > > > significant buildup of plaque while his wife with a TC over 300 was
    > > > > > free of plaque buildup. He asked Dr. Donohue how that could be
    > > > > > possible. Dr. Donohue replied "there are forces other than cholesterol
    > > > > > responsible for clogging arteries." He went on to suggest that had
    > > > > > this guy's TC been higher he could have had a heart attack.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Well, here I was feeling secure with a TC of 133 and LDL of just 81
    > > > > > and now I wonder what "other forces" are killing me.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > By the way, anyone know about this electron-beam tomography?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Mel
     
  8. M. Schwartz

    M. Schwartz Guest

    [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    Brad, I am eating nuts, oily fish, and olive oil. I have also
    increased the amount of exercise. I don't have angina. The bypass was
    done because of 1 severely clogged artery and they did 3 other
    moderately clogged arteries.

    I don't take any medication except for 10 mg of Zocor.

    Niaspan does not reverse heart disease. I have heart disease because I
    had a bypass - but my heart functions normally - according to the test
    that measures heart function. I don't have any problem walking up
    hills or otherwise.

    Niaspan is not without possible serious side effects. My cardiologist
    is quite pleased with my lipid profile and not concerned about my HDL
    being 38. However, I am exercising more and expect the next blood test
    to reveal a higher HDL.

    Mel


    > The question is your odds of a coronary event. Mel, if I were in your
    > shoes I'd try to increase my (low) HDL. How? 1) eat up to 40% fat by
    > eating more nuts, oily fish, and olive oil. 2) exercise more (if your
    > doc allows) 3 consider Niaspan and a drink a day. Here's an
    > encouraging site about actually reversing blockages:
    > http://www.niaspan.com/templates/hcp.asp?class=2&page=2
    > Disclaimer: I mean well but am not a doctor or expert.
    >
    > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > > Brad, why should I worry about the risk when I already have it? The
    > > bypass in 1998 makes me a statistical CHD person. The only thing I
    > > have to do now is keep my narrow grafts clean as long as possible.
    > >
    > > Mel, not worried, just being cautious. :)
    > >
    > >
    > > > Mel,
    > > >
    > > > Here's a risk calculator from the NIH:
    > > > http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov/atpiii/calculator.asp?usertype=pub My risk
    > > > came to 2% for CHD in the next ten years. http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov
    > > > has a lot of good info.
    > > >
    > > > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > > Mel,
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Two more factors besides chol, CRP and Hba1c do a better job than TC
    > > > > > in prediction CHD. As you know, the TC/ HDL ratio does a better job
    > > > > > than TC also. The electron-beam tomography isn't recommended because
    > > > > > it may prompt unneccessary procedures. Also, the jury may be still
    > > > > > out about how valid it is. I just read in the Framington study a chol
    > > > > > below 160 predicts a very low risk of CHD - you should be fine if you
    > > > > > don't worry too much!
    > > > >
    > > > > Look who's talking. Your the guy with a great HDL of 68 and worrying
    > > > > what to take to replace your Lipitor. :)
    > > > >
    > > > > Brad, I already have CHD. I had a bypass in 1998 and that means I am
    > > > > considered to have CHD. What I need is a study to show a TC lower than
    > > > > 160 predicts my narrow grafts will last 50 years. :)
    > > > >
    > > > > Mel
    > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > > > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > > > Dr. Paul G. Donohue writes a syndicated column that I read in a local
    > > > > > > newspaper. One of the questions today came from a guy who along with
    > > > > > > his wife had an electron-beam tomography to detect plaque buildup in
    > > > > > > coronary arteries. He was amazed that with a TC level of 184 he had
    > > > > > > significant buildup of plaque while his wife with a TC over 300 was
    > > > > > > free of plaque buildup. He asked Dr. Donohue how that could be
    > > > > > > possible. Dr. Donohue replied "there are forces other than cholesterol
    > > > > > > responsible for clogging arteries." He went on to suggest that had
    > > > > > > this guy's TC been higher he could have had a heart attack.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Well, here I was feeling secure with a TC of 133 and LDL of just 81
    > > > > > > and now I wonder what "other forces" are killing me.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > By the way, anyone know about this electron-beam tomography?
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Mel
     
  9. Great job, Mel. You're beating 99% of your age group. Just think how
    much lower our health insurance could be if everyone took care of
    themselves like you. I'm at least a year away from "flat belly" - I'm
    trying.

    [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Mel, sounds like you're doing the right things. Hopefully your HDL
    > > will rise. I'm just guessing that higher HDL would help prevent
    > > reclogging, I haven't see any studies. I'm working on trying to lose
    > > my belly fat as you have - that's a real challenge for a 55 year old.
    > > Good luck to you.

    >
    > Brad, I'm 61 and my belly looks like a lean 17 year old's belly. I not
    > only do lots of walking but also workout with dumbells - trying to get
    > that Schwarzenegger look. :)
    >
    > In order to lose that belly fat in our age group, I believe you have
    > to tear yourself down and rebuild.
    >
    > Mel
    >
    > >
    > > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > >
    > > > Brad, I am eating nuts, oily fish, and olive oil. I have also
    > > > increased the amount of exercise. I don't have angina. The bypass was
    > > > done because of 1 severely clogged artery and they did 3 other
    > > > moderately clogged arteries.
    > > >
    > > > I don't take any medication except for 10 mg of Zocor.
    > > >
    > > > Niaspan does not reverse heart disease. I have heart disease because I
    > > > had a bypass - but my heart functions normally - according to the test
    > > > that measures heart function. I don't have any problem walking up
    > > > hills or otherwise.
    > > >
    > > > Niaspan is not without possible serious side effects. My cardiologist
    > > > is quite pleased with my lipid profile and not concerned about my HDL
    > > > being 38. However, I am exercising more and expect the next blood test
    > > > to reveal a higher HDL.
    > > >
    > > > Mel
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > The question is your odds of a coronary event. Mel, if I were in your
    > > > > shoes I'd try to increase my (low) HDL. How? 1) eat up to 40% fat by
    > > > > eating more nuts, oily fish, and olive oil. 2) exercise more (if your
    > > > > doc allows) 3 consider Niaspan and a drink a day. Here's an
    > > > > encouraging site about actually reversing blockages:
    > > > > http://www.niaspan.com/templates/hcp.asp?class=2&page=2
    > > > > Disclaimer: I mean well but am not a doctor or expert.
    > > > >
    > > > > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Brad, why should I worry about the risk when I already have it? The
    > > > > > bypass in 1998 makes me a statistical CHD person. The only thing I
    > > > > > have to do now is keep my narrow grafts clean as long as possible.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Mel, not worried, just being cautious. :)
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > > > > Mel,
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Here's a risk calculator from the NIH:
    > > > > > > http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov/atpiii/calculator.asp?usertype=pub My risk
    > > > > > > came to 2% for CHD in the next ten years. http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov
    > > > > > > has a lot of good info.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > > > > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > > > > > Mel,
    > > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > > > Two more factors besides chol, CRP and Hba1c do a better job than TC
    > > > > > > > > in prediction CHD. As you know, the TC/ HDL ratio does a better job
    > > > > > > > > than TC also. The electron-beam tomography isn't recommended because
    > > > > > > > > it may prompt unneccessary procedures. Also, the jury may be still
    > > > > > > > > out about how valid it is. I just read in the Framington study a chol
    > > > > > > > > below 160 predicts a very low risk of CHD - you should be fine if you
    > > > > > > > > don't worry too much!
    > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > > Look who's talking. Your the guy with a great HDL of 68 and worrying
    > > > > > > > what to take to replace your Lipitor. :)
    > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > > Brad, I already have CHD. I had a bypass in 1998 and that means I am
    > > > > > > > considered to have CHD. What I need is a study to show a TC lower than
    > > > > > > > 160 predicts my narrow grafts will last 50 years. :)
    > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > > Mel
    > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > > > [email protected] (M. Schwartz) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > > > > > > Dr. Paul G. Donohue writes a syndicated column that I read in a local
    > > > > > > > > > newspaper. One of the questions today came from a guy who along with
    > > > > > > > > > his wife had an electron-beam tomography to detect plaque buildup in
    > > > > > > > > > coronary arteries. He was amazed that with a TC level of 184 he had
    > > > > > > > > > significant buildup of plaque while his wife with a TC over 300 was
    > > > > > > > > > free of plaque buildup. He asked Dr. Donohue how that could be
    > > > > > > > > > possible. Dr. Donohue replied "there are forces other than cholesterol
    > > > > > > > > > responsible for clogging arteries." He went on to suggest that had
    > > > > > > > > > this guy's TC been higher he could have had a heart attack.
    > > > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > > > > Well, here I was feeling secure with a TC of 133 and LDL of just 81
    > > > > > > > > > and now I wonder what "other forces" are killing me.
    > > > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > > > > By the way, anyone know about this electron-beam tomography?
    > > > > > > > > >
    > > > > > > > > > Mel
     
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