tchibo bike stuff

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Michael Klontza, Mar 9, 2003.

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  1. Check out <www.tchibo.co.uk> for this week's offers. There is a store locator somewhere. Some of the
    items are excellent value for money. The theme changes every Wednesday. Out of curiosity, if someone
    can explain to me what those two elasticated loops on the middle fingers of the fingerless mitts are
    for, I'll appreciate it very much :)

    --
    Michael Klontzas 'If everything seems to be coming your way, you're probably in the wrong lane'
    (Borstelmann's Rule)
     
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  2. Rg

    Rg Guest

    The loops on the mitts are probably there to help you take them off - you connect 2 fingers from the
    other hand to them and pull ! (Assuming they are like the cycling mitts I have with a sort of turn
    back on the material at the end of 2 of the fingers for exactly this purpose)

    RG

    "Michael Klontzas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Check out <www.tchibo.co.uk> for this week's offers. There is a store locator somewhere. Some of
    > the items are excellent value for money. The theme changes every Wednesday. Out of curiosity, if
    > someone can explain to me what those two elasticated loops on the middle fingers of the fingerless
    > mitts are for, I'll appreciate it very much :)
    >
    > --
    > Michael Klontzas 'If everything seems to be coming your way, you're probably in the wrong lane'
    > (Borstelmann's Rule)
     
  3. >The loops on the mitts are probably there to help you take them off - you connect 2 fingers from
    >the other hand to them and pull !

    Nah - they're bogie catapults ;-)

    Motorist gets too close, snot into close and catapult at motorist ;-)

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  4. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Mon, 10 Mar 2003 04:27:05 -0000, Michael Klontzas scrawled: ) Check out <www.tchibo.co.uk> for
    this week's offers.

    Hi-tech bike socks, apparently:

    http://www.tchibo.co.uk/is-bin/INTERSHOP.enfinity/eCS/Store/uk/-/GBP/TdUkDisplayProductInfo-
    rmation-Start;sid=RohDN29HHW9DJ1ErIkhJU2zfYH9bQ9jJkjQ=?ProductSKU=M9023

    Threads merge, 1/2 mile. Keep in lane.

    J-P
    --
    I imagine [realtors] providing the classic mob-movie rationalization, which always comes before the
    big shoot-out, for corrupt capitalist behavior: "People have a need. I provide for that need. What's
    the harm in that?"
     
  5. Thus spake Michael Klontzas <[email protected]>

    > Check out <www.tchibo.co.uk> for this week's offers. There is a store locator somewhere. Some of
    > the items are excellent value for money. The theme changes every Wednesday. Out of curiosity, if
    > someone can explain to me what those two elasticated loops on the middle fingers of the fingerless
    > mitts are for, I'll appreciate it very much :)

    They are to assist removal of the mitts. At £3.99, the mitts are cheap, but the shape of the gel
    pads appears rather thick & clumsy to me.

    I visited my local Tchibo yesterday & checked out the bike stuff.

    The track pump at £9.99 was cheap. The barrel is rather short and wide. Methinks getting a high
    pressure would be difficult, though the Schraeder/Presta adaptor looked good.

    I was unable to lift the (allegedly) aluminium bicycles. They are really *very* heavy, though
    specced with dynamos.

    The bicycle multitool was not selling. It will probably be reduced in their sale. (The puncture
    patches included looked good, but the ring spanners looked tinny)

    The handlebar bag needed to be fitted to the bike - not very handy if you run several bicycles.

    The solar/battery computer seemed reasonable @ £9.99. It is a 'wireless' type (but I already have a
    supply of Cat Eye & Vetta computers)

    The most interesting item I saw was a jacket for £19.99 which featured reflective piping, detachable
    sleeves, a detachable fleece lining & a hood concealed in the collar. The shop seemed to have sold
    out of XL jackets.

    The saddles looked too wide & chunky for serious touring cyclists and I'd probably give their
    suspension seatpost a miss too.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  6. "j-p.s" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Mon, 10 Mar 2003 04:27:05 -0000, Michael Klontzas scrawled: ) Check out <www.tchibo.co.uk> for
    > this week's offers.
    >
    > Hi-tech bike socks, apparently:
    >
    > http://www.tchibo.co.uk/is-bin/INTERSHOP.enfinity/eCS/Store/uk/-/GBP/TdUkDisplayProductInfo-
    > rmation-Start;sid=RohDN29HHW9DJ1ErIkhJU2zfYH9bQ9jJkjQ=?ProductSKU=M9023
    >
    > Threads merge, 1/2 mile. Keep in lane.
    >
    > J-P

    DONT' BUY THE GLOVES

    Sorry for shouting, but I bought a pair last year, and they were the most uncomfortable things to
    wear ever (and I've worn some pretty nasty clothes). They pinched the little flaps of skin between
    my fingers really badly.

    I've got two pairs of Tchibo bib tights - be aware that the chamois is massive, and they seem to use
    the same chamois in everything they do.

    I bought my wife the cycling glasses - they seem to meet all the eyecare standards, which is
    quite nice.

    The "cycling shorts" - the ultra short black ones - are more properly liners to go beneath
    outer shorts.

    The three in one jackets may be worth a look.

    The windproof undershirts are good value, I always feel warmer when I'm wearing mine, well worth
    the money.

    If you need cheap kit then it's well worth a look. You could stock up on commuting/training gear
    no problem.
     
  7. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On 10 Mar 2003 05:52:50 -0800, stephen pridgeon scrawled: ) "j-p.s" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:<[email protected]>... ) > http://www.tchibo.co.uk-
    /is-bin/INTERSHOP.enfinity/eCS/Store/uk/-/GBP/TdUkDisplayProductInformation-Start;sid=RohDN29HHW9DJ-
    1ErIkhJU2zfYH9bQ9jJkjQ=?ProductSKU=M9023 ) ) DONT' BUY THE GLOVES ) ) Sorry for shouting

    That's fine. The apostrophe, on the other hand....

    I've only ever worn simple Thinsulate gloves while riding. I have experienced no ill effects. Are
    special gloves similar to special sprays which are meant to make the sound from your CDs better?

    J-P
    --
    What time should we set the alarm?
     
  8. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    j-p.s wrote:
    > I've only ever worn simple Thinsulate gloves while riding. I have experienced no ill effects.

    Good for you, but some of us need more padding.

    > Are special gloves similar to special sprays which are meant to make the sound from your
    > CDs better?

    The (Ozzo) gel mitts I've used really do have a big effect. Something physically that chunky can't
    fail to. I forget to put them on them every now and then and am _only_ reminded by the discomfort I
    notice after a mile or two, and usually turn back to get them because they're so useful.

    My favourite bit of hi fi nonsense was a kit of foil triangular stickers given away with a magazine.
    They were supposed to be strategically placed around the room, including one on the record label and
    one on the door knob. It wasn't an April issue.

    --
    ~PB FA: 62cm Ti frame: http://tinyurl.com/6stt
     
  9. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Mon, 10 Mar 2003 16:19:30 -0000, Pete Biggs scrawled: ) The (Ozzo) gel mitts I've used really do
    have a big effect. Something ) physically that chunky can't fail to. I forget to put them on them
    every ) now and then and am _only_ reminded by the discomfort I notice after a ) mile or two, and
    usually turn back to get them because they're so useful.

    I'm not convinced. I used Boots medicated chapstick for years. Every time I stopped using it my lips
    went chapped and painful. The one time I stopped using it for more than a couple of months I
    realised the chapstick had made my lips hypersensitive, and eventually they settled down to the
    point where I only ever need a spot of vaseline in cold weather.

    I don't really experience the discomfort you do. Perhaps if I wore gel mitts for a while, then I
    would when I stopped wearing them.

    ... On another note, isn't vaseline amazing? Lipsalve, hair gel, moisturiser and makeshift emergency
    bike grease.

    ) My favourite bit of hi fi nonsense was a kit of foil triangular stickers ) given away with a
    magazine. They were supposed to be strategically placed ) around the room, including one on the
    record label and one on the door ) knob.

    What exactly were they meant to do? Shield your music from doorknob pickup?

    J-P
    --
    "We have footage, too alarming to show you, of a little boy being interfered with by a penis-shaped
    soundwave generated by an online paedophile." --Kate Thornton
     
  10. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    j-p.s, wind-up merchant, hopefully, wrote:
    > On Mon, 10 Mar 2003 16:19:30 -0000, Pete Biggs scrawled: ) The (Ozzo) gel mitts I've used really
    > do have a big effect. Something ) physically that chunky can't fail to. I forget to put them on
    > them every ) now and then and am _only_ reminded by the discomfort I notice after a ) mile or two,
    > and usually turn back to get them because they're so useful.
    >
    > I'm not convinced.

    Well, you are wrong.

    > I used Boots medicated chapstick for years. Every time I stopped using it my lips went chapped and
    > painful.

    Funnily enough, I use Chapstick (non medicated). I had dry cracked lips for years, before I tried
    it. I don't any more, and yes, probably would again if I stopped using anything.

    > The one time I stopped using it for more than a couple of months I realised the chapstick had made
    > my lips hypersensitive, and eventually they settled down to the point where I only ever need a
    > spot of vaseline in cold weather.
    >
    > I don't really experience the discomfort you do. Perhaps if I wore gel mitts for a while, then I
    > would when I stopped wearing them.

    But I got bad discomfort BEFORE I ever tried gel mitts - for years, and do again now when I stop
    wearing them. How clear is that!

    Are you so cynical that you think the benefits of every cycling product anyone likes are purely in
    the mind? It seems you don't appreciate that other people can't have certain problems (and find
    solutions to them) just because you've never had them yourself. And hand-pressure discomfort happens
    to be a very common problem for cyclists, as well.

    Also, unless your hands are /perfectly/ comfortable, ie. your palms feel no pressure at all, there
    is a chance that you might be /more/ comfortable with gel mitts. On the other hand, there's also
    quite a chance that you would hate them.

    In case you don't know, the overall palm thickness of the mitts I use (at a gel insert) is over 6mm,
    so it's not material which is going to have an imperceptible effect. And of course, even thin gloves
    have a different effect on hand comfort than no gloves.

    > ... On another note, isn't vaseline amazing? Lipsalve, hair gel, moisturiser and makeshift
    > emergency bike grease.

    ...And titanium frame polish. But less convenient than Chapstick - for lips not frames.

    --
    ~PB FA: 62cm Ti frame: http://tinyurl.com/6stt
     
  11. Alex Graham

    Alex Graham Guest

    I went for the clear glasses and the rucksack (for its rucksack features rather than mank water
    carrying features).

    I didnt see any bibtights, and I was wondering why women get 3/4 tights while men only get shorts
    in there...

    I take it they had cycling stuff in there last year then?

    The 3 in one jacket did look good - the medium was a bit too big for me though and small doesnt
    exist according to the blokey. The multitool looked fairly poor, and they certainly werent selling
    out. I was thinking all the shorts etc looked very shiny with very large chamois with very messy
    stitching - maybe I'm too fussy though. Taking into account the rip off prices of most cycling wear
    tho they are probably worth it....

    --
    ----------------------+ Alex Graham | [email protected] | ----------------------+
     
  12. Thus spake Alex Graham <[email protected]>

    > I take it they had cycling stuff in there last year then?

    Yes, I ended up with a rather good briefcase pannier in the sale. I seemed to miss the week when it
    was there main feature.

    > The 3 in one jacket did look good - the medium was a bit too big for me though and small doesnt
    > exist according to the blokey.

    My friend, whom I would describe as 'medium' in size took a 'large' as he did not think the sleeves
    on the medium were long enough when he stretched forward.

    Tchibo seem *never* to sell 'small' men's stuff. Maybe men don't like to be so classified.

    > The multitool looked fairly poor, and they certainly werent selling out. I was thinking all the
    > shorts etc looked very shiny with very large chamois with very messy stitching - maybe I'm too
    > fussy though. Taking into account the rip off prices of most cycling wear tho they are probably
    > worth it....

    A visit to the Tchibo website shows one sort of shorts to have sold out already...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  13. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > j-p.s, wind-up merchant, hopefully, wrote:

    > > ... On another note, isn't vaseline amazing? Lipsalve, hair gel, moisturiser and makeshift
    > > emergency bike grease.
    >
    > ...And titanium frame polish. But less convenient than Chapstick - for lips not frames.

    Nipple, toe and inner thigh lubricant for running.

    --
    Dave...
     
  14. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Mon, 10 Mar 2003 20:08:10 -0000, Pete Biggs scrawled: ) > I'm not convinced. ) ) Well, you
    are wrong.

    "Thanks."

    ) But I got bad discomfort BEFORE I ever tried gel mitts - for years, and do ) again now when I stop
    wearing them. How clear is that!

    I would suggest therefore, given all the cyclists I know (and there are many) have no discomfort
    after the mile or so that you talk about to the extent where they are all pining for gel in their
    palms, that either something is wrong with your bike frame or you have very, very unusual hands. I
    don't deny that such gloves have a use in long-distance or rough terrain cycling. However, If you
    experience discomfort after only "a mile or two" without them then that puts you in a very thin
    percentile of the population.

    J-P
    --
    Andy Mueller-Maguhn has been talking to AOL about children's internet access and filtering same. It
    was all going well, lots of agreement about unsuitable content, and then someone suggested filtering
    adverts and "it all went quiet"...
     
  15. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 09:01:20 +0000 (UTC), j-p.s scrawled: ) I would suggest therefore, given all the
    cyclists I know (and there are ) many)

    This sounds presumptuous; I meant "commuter cyclists" in order to stress the weirdness of noticing
    the discomfort due to lack of gel gloves over short distances. I have no doubt that, being an
    occasional cyclist, I know fewer cyclists than the average in urc. However, being an out-of-town
    student I probably know more commuter cyclists than the average.

    J-P
    --
    tests=LINES_OF_YELLING_3,LINES_OF_YELLING_2,LINES_OF_YELLING, FROM_AND_TO_SAME version=2.31
     
  16. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    j-p.s wrote:

    > ) But I got bad discomfort BEFORE I ever tried gel mitts - for years, and do ) again now when I
    > stop wearing them. How clear is that!
    >
    > I would suggest therefore, given all the cyclists I know (and there are many) have no discomfort
    > after the mile or so that you talk about to the extent where they are all pining for gel in their
    > palms, that either something is wrong with your bike frame or you have very, very unusual hands.

    To clarify/correct, the discomfort without the mitts after a mile or two is not severe but is enough
    to trouble me (and on second thoughts, it's more like two than one mile; I have gone more than 1.5
    miles before I've realised I've forgotten them). The discomfort then steps up a gear within the next
    5 to 8 miles then becomes severe after that. I may well have unusual hands and my riding position
    may indeed be less than perfect (is a compromise one for speed and comfort - on both my road bike &
    tourer with drop bars below saddle).

    > I don't deny that such gloves have a use in long-distance or rough terrain cycling.

    Obviously, the longer the distance, the /more/ useful they will become, but I think they are worth
    trying for anyone who gets hand discomfort (moderate to severe) - which can set in quite early into
    rides for some people. They may not be strictly necessary for them on _short_ rides, but why not
    have that luxury anyway if the gloves are comfortable and practical to wear?

    > However, If you experience discomfort after only "a mile or two" without them then that puts you
    > in a very thin percentile of the population.

    I don't remember claiming gel mitts are necessary, useful or desirable or anything for the majority
    of the population. In fact, I can quite believe that many people wouldn't ever like them at all, let
    alone need them.

    What I objected to was the suggestion that they couldn't be genuienly useful for me and anyone in my
    position. Sorry if I got the wrong end of the stick.

    ~PB
     
  17. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    j-p.s wrote:
    > On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 09:01:20 +0000 (UTC), j-p.s scrawled: ) I would suggest therefore, given all
    > the cyclists I know (and there are ) many)
    >
    > This sounds presumptuous; I meant "commuter cyclists" in order to stress the weirdness of noticing
    > the discomfort due to lack of gel gloves over short distances. I have no doubt that, being an
    > occasional cyclist, I know fewer cyclists than the average in urc. However, being an out-of-town
    > student I probably know more commuter cyclists than the average.

    Fair enough. That is a relevant point because I have my bars lower than the average commuter
    cyclist, using drop bars*, and that does put more pressure on hands (I have much less problem on
    more upright bikes*). Specifically, the hand discomfort is worse for me when riding on the "tops" -
    which happens to be a position I otherwise like a lot. Also, I find the gel mitts help with riding
    on the hoods of Campagnolo Ergo levers (particularly when both cables are routed to front of bars).
    On the other hand, though, plenty of cyclists who use a more racy position than me don't get enough
    discomfort to justify wearing anything more than ordinary gloves or track mitts. They're obviously
    harder than me (in many ways, I'm sure!) - and I have no problem with that :)

    * I occasionally also ride a mountain bike with straight bars (with a not-very-low position),
    and find the mitts useful on this as well but only get much benefit from them on rides of over
    7 to 10 miles.

    ~PB
     
  18. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Tue, 11 Mar 2003 10:48:32 -0000, Pete Biggs scrawled: ) Fair enough. That is a relevant point
    because I have my bars lower than ) the average commuter cyclist, using drop bars*, and that does
    put more ) pressure on hands (I have much less problem on more upright bikes*).

    Ah, OK. Suddenly it all becomes clearer. Although I'd still worry if I were you, and noticed a
    problem over a mile or two. It may be that the discomfort you *notice* without gloves is turning
    into *unnoticeable*, RSI-inducing vibrations with gloves, and over the course of twenty years it
    might become problematic.

    It's the mile or two that worried me initially.

    J-P
    --
    by Sheldon "Reformed Chain Smoker" Brown (This article is also available in Russian)
     
  19. Alex Graham

    Alex Graham Guest

    Do you know if they still have the cycling stock in on wednesday, or will it have changed over? Also
    when you say 'sale' do you mean as in _even_ cheaper? I may revisit in that case..

    -Alex

    --
    ----------------------+ Alex Graham | [email protected] | ----------------------+
     
  20. Thus spake Alex Graham <[email protected]>

    > Do you know if they still have the cycling stock in on wednesday, or will it have changed over?
    > Also when you say 'sale' do you mean as in _even_ cheaper? I may revisit in that case..

    They tend to keep stuff for up to four weeks, though will introduce their 'Spring is in the Air'
    range tomorrow. When the stuff is gone, it's gone. If there is something for which you are
    desparate, you could order online (so long as you're sure about size and fit etc) Their stuff will
    be *even* cheaper in their summer sale (or on their 'Nice Price' page.)

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
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