TDF history & old bicycles

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Zelda, Jul 17, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Zelda

    Zelda Guest

    With the publicity about the 100th anniversery of the TDF, I started wondering what the bicycles
    were like in 1903. I found a good web site, though I wish it had more pictures:

    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/veloarchive/races/tour/index.htm

    This page http://homepage.ntlworld.com/veloarchive/races/tour/1908.htm has a pretty good picture of
    the bike, which has only one sprocket on the back, and no brakes that I can see.

    This page http://homepage.ntlworld.com/veloarchive/races/tour/1922.htm shows that at the top of a
    mountain, "two riders stop to change to a higher gear for the descent". Does anyone know what they
    are actually doing - are they removing the sprocket and installing a larger one? And where are
    their brakes??

    The 1938 page says, "Note the primitive derailleur gears, allowed in the Tour for the first time in
    1938." Interesting stuff.
     
    Tags:


  2. Arthg

    Arthg Guest

    >>Does anyone know what they are actually doing - are they removing the
    sprocket and installing a larger one?

    I believe there was a single gear on both sides of the hub, so the riders would just 180 the wheel.

    "Zelda" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > With the publicity about the 100th anniversery of the TDF, I started wondering what the bicycles
    > were like in 1903. I found a good web site, though I wish it had more pictures:
    >
    > http://homepage.ntlworld.com/veloarchive/races/tour/index.htm
    >
    > This page http://homepage.ntlworld.com/veloarchive/races/tour/1908.htm has a pretty good picture
    > of the bike, which has only one sprocket on the back, and no brakes that I can see.
    >
    > This page http://homepage.ntlworld.com/veloarchive/races/tour/1922.htm shows that at the top of a
    > mountain, "two riders stop to change to a higher gear for the descent". Does anyone know what they
    > are actually doing - are they removing the sprocket and installing a larger one? And where are
    > their brakes??
    >
    > The 1938 page says, "Note the primitive derailleur gears, allowed in the Tour for the first time
    > in 1938." Interesting stuff.

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
  3. Benjo Maso

    Benjo Maso Guest

    "Arthg" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >>Does anyone know what they are actually doing - are they removing the
    > sprocket and installing a larger one?
    >
    > I believe there was a single gear on both sides of the hub, so the riders would just 180
    > the wheel.

    Right.

    > > The 1938 page says, "Note the primitive derailleur gears, allowed in the Tour for the first time
    > > in 1938." Interesting stuff.
    >

    Not quite correct. Derailleurs were already allowed before the First World War (some kind of Sturmey
    Archer-model), but only for individual riders and only for a few years. From 1937 on (not 1938) they
    were allowed for everybody.

    Benjo Maso
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...