Teams Implicated Thus Far



A

Allez1

Guest
"Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> in message <R%[email protected]>, B.
> Lafferty ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
>> "Zak" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>> Well in France, at least, the sport is dead. Since 1998 Festina doping
>>> scandal the numbers of "licences" at the Cycling French Federation
>>> decreased year after year. Parents don't want they kids to practice
>>> such a tainted sport. And young amateurs are more and more reluctant
>>> to become pro. Indeed it concerns just one country yet one country
>>> which used to be important in this discipline and is now a non factor.
>>> You might blame the medias, but anyway, doping killed this sport in
>>> France.

>>
>> Just wait. A French rider may well win the Tour this year. ;-)

>
> Allors! C'est un cochon de vol!
>
> I mean, I've a soft spot for Thomas Voeckler, but come on!
>
> --
> [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
>
> 'You cannot put "The Internet" into the Recycle Bin.'
>

Perhaps he had Sany Casar in mind. It would be poetic if Cedric V. won.



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H

Howard Kveck

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Zak" <[email protected]> wrote:

> Well in France, at least, the sport is dead. Since 1998 Festina doping
> scandal the numbers of "licences" at the Cycling French Federation
> decreased year after year. Parents don't want they kids to practice
> such a tainted sport. And young amateurs are more and more reluctant to
> become pro. Indeed it concerns just one country yet one country which
> used to be important in this discipline and is now a non factor. You
> might blame the medias, but anyway, doping killed this sport in France.


I'm curious where you get the info that brings you to the conclusion that
"Parents don't want they kids to practice such a tainted sport." Have there been
public opinion polls with published results that show this? I'm just wondering if
you're jumping to conclusions based on your personal prejudices. I think that there
are many reasons why cycling isn't as popular among French kids, such as simple
cultural drift.

--
tanx,
Howard

Never take a tenant with a monkey.

remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
 
H

Howard Kveck

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, "Allez1" <[email protected]>
wrote:

> Perhaps he had Sany Casar in mind. It would be poetic if Cedric V. won.


Poetic, oui. Likely, non.

--
tanx,
Howard

Never take a tenant with a monkey.

remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
 
E

Eric

Guest
Zak wrote:
>doping killed this sport in France.


I'd wager that the odds of becoming a star in a sport that does not test as much as cycling does are
greater, so the kids focus on that. It's not that they want to dope per se, but sports that are more
permissive of doping will produce more spectacular stars.
 
Dear Tom:
Yeah. To carry the assumption of innocence AND cynicism a bit
further, if one WAS operating a blood-doping/EPO lab, why WOULDN'T one
aggressively market just testing services (at first) to pro cycling
teams. It'd act both as a "cover" for all the neat toys and disposables
AND as an easy way to get one-on-one with individual riders to make the
pitch for "enhanced services."

Robert Leone, just back from the blood bank where I got deferred due to
low hemoglobin....

[email protected]

Tom Kunich wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > Hello Allez1:
> > Worst case for reputations scenario would be:
> > The "clean" teams were sending their riders for private testing to make
> > sure they were "clean" to the hematologists who were doing the "dirty"
> > work for the "dirty" teams/riders. After all, who'd have the most
> > experience in TESTING blood to see that it met UCI/WADA guidelines as a
> > quality control measure?

>
> That is a point. Probably entirely incorrect but certainly a
> possibility. Remember so many riders were testing right on the very
> edge of legal hematocrit that it isn't too far out to suspect that
> everyone was riding the line including those people who would NATURALLY
> exceed the hematocrit but weren't able to document it well enough for
> the UCI.
>
> My normal hematocrit, living at sea level is 48%-49%. What would it be
> if I lived in Crested Butte, CO, at 9200 feet (2800 meters)?