technique question

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Lev Borisov, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. Lev Borisov

    Lev Borisov Guest

    Hi all,

    I seem to have noticed a problem with my technique and was wondering
    if any of you have encountered something similar. Namely, I seem to
    be using my arms to rotate the body (front crawl), rather than using
    the trunk/leg muscles. Or at least the arms are a large part of it.
    What would be good drills to try to overcome this habit, which by now
    is pretty ingrained?

    Lev
     
    Tags:


  2. DaKitty

    DaKitty Guest

    "Lev Borisov" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I seem to have noticed a problem with my technique and was wondering
    > if any of you have encountered something similar. Namely, I seem to
    > be using my arms to rotate the body (front crawl), rather than using
    > the trunk/leg muscles. Or at least the arms are a large part of it.
    > What would be good drills to try to overcome this habit, which by now
    > is pretty ingrained?
    >
    > Lev


    Kicking drills, lot of kicking on your side, 6 kicks on one side, take one
    stroke, 6 kicks on the other side...
    Keep your abs tightened, and think of yourself as if on a skewer, everything
    moves together, no twisting at the waist.
    Hips and abs start the rotation and drive it to the shoulder, legs follow.
    Emphasize the 'hip snap' for a while.
     
  3. Coach_Ryan

    Coach_Ryan Guest

    I would add two kicking drills to what was listed:

    The first is "Around the World Kick". Kick on your stomach with your
    head down, and when you want to breathe, rotate ALL THE WAY ONTO YOUR
    BACK. If you do this right, you'll rotate from your hip and gut, and
    your whole body will stay connected. The key is to not turn your head,
    then your shoulders, and then your hips. Your body turns together.

    Another drill is "rotational kick". Basically, you just rotate your
    body while keeping your head in the same position. You're still
    working on keeping your whole body alighed. I'd recommend getting a
    Finis brand snorkel and using fins too for this one.

    -Ryan
    http://www.ICoachSwimming.com
     
  4. Lev Borisov wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I seem to have noticed a problem with my technique and was wondering
    > if any of you have encountered something similar. Namely, I seem to
    > be using my arms to rotate the body (front crawl), rather than using
    > the trunk/leg muscles. Or at least the arms are a large part of it.
    > What would be good drills to try to overcome this habit, which by now


    > is pretty ingrained?
    >
    > Lev


    Your question is not easy to answer. There's not agreement on this
    even with the experts. Maglischo says the arms start the stroke,
    whereas people like Bob Prichard swear by the hips.

    I vote for the hips being the power for the stroke, but it's not
    trivial to swim that way.

    Do you want to use your hip/leg motion to aid the front of your stroke
    or the back of the stroke?

    In a standard two-beat or six-beat rhythm, there's a vigorous kick near
    the end of the arm pull. That will get your hips to the other side and
    help the final outward and upward pull of the arm. It's fairly
    intuitive to swim that way in my opinion.

    However, I think a lot of elite males swim a different way. They've
    changed the timing of their kicks to aid the front part of the pull.
    The best way to see that is on video of Hackett or Keller when they are
    using a four beat kick. You can try it for yourself - assuming you are
    right handed and breath right (that seems to be most common). After
    recovery of your right arm back into the water, your left leg should be
    down and your right leg up. Bring your right hand down to catch, then
    scissor your legs (left leg up, right leg down) - you can feel the
    torque that gets generated that wants to rotate your hips. That will
    also pull your right arm back. You can feel the power from the hips
    helping the front part of your right arm pull.

    Eric
     
  5. Mike Edey

    Mike Edey Guest

    On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 09:38:52 -0800, ekurth wrote:

    <snip>

    >> any of you have encountered something similar. Namely, I seem to be
    >> using my arms to rotate the body (front crawl), rather than using the


    <snip>

    > Your question is not easy to answer. There's not agreement on this even
    > with the experts. Maglischo says the arms start the stroke, whereas
    > people like Bob Prichard swear by the hips.
    >
    > I vote for the hips being the power for the stroke, but it's not trivial
    > to swim that way.


    Eric brings up some good points and to toss in my $0.02 I'd like to
    mention that at slower speeds, ie anything achievable (let alone
    maintainable) by we the mere mortals, I think the matter is more a
    question of timing than emphasis.

    Personally I'm in favour of a 'monolithic' body roll with a similar
    degree of rotation for both shoulders and hips. My weaker and younger
    swimmers often have a challenge getting their hips to roll at all, being
    rather focused on their hands, and end up swinging their arms in large
    arcs through the recovery resulting in over reaching problems on entry and
    fishtailing though the pull.

    A drill I like, and have had some success with, is a dry land drill. If
    you've got access to a full length mirror you've got a good opportunity to
    practice the timing and get a little balance work in to boot. Begin facing
    the/a wall perpendicular to the mirror feet nearly double shoulder width
    apart arms raised to the sides until your hands are at navel height. Turn
    your head to look at the mirror and lean forward taking the weight off
    the back foot. If done carefully most of your body should be hidden behind
    the side facing the mirror.

    The idea of the drill is to take this exaggerated 90deg position and
    smoothly 'roll' to the other side. Switch feet, swing hands (thumbs
    brushing your thighs 'out of the way') and hide the other side of your
    body.

    If done smoothly and with with control the hips _have_ to roll with the
    shoulders and there _will_ be a down 'kick' with the timing Eric mentions.

    --Mike
     
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