Technology for Kurgan and Pappy

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Clovis Lark, Dec 10, 2003.

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  1. Clovis Lark

    Clovis Lark Guest

    December 8, 2003 Heads-Up Displays Move From Cockpits to Cyclists' Helmets By JOHN MARKOFF

    AN FRANCISCO, Dec. 7 - Fighter pilots have long been able to view flight data projected onto jet
    windshields within their line of sight. Soon recreational motorcyclists and bicyclists will be able
    to take advantage of that technology.

    Motion Research, a Seattle company founded in 1993 by a former racecar driver, Dominic Dobson, said
    that next spring it would begin selling an inexpensive information display system to be attached to
    a motorcycle helmet.

    The Sportvue head-mounted display will allow riders to see speed, r.p.m. and gear position without
    taking their eyes off the road. The system gathers speed information from a global positioning
    satellite receiver attached to the rear of the helmet.

    The design, based on a patent co-developed by Tom Furness, one of the pioneers of head-mounted
    display technology, uses a lens and mirror and backlit liquid crystal display to give the viewer the
    illusion that the information displayed in the periphery of one eye is projected in the distance.

    Mr. Dobson founded Motion Research when he was racing Indianapolis and Formula One cars, and his
    initial idea was to use the display technology for racecar drivers. But the cost of producing
    such displays was prohibitively high a decade ago. He retired in 1998 and recently picked the
    idea up again because the costs of the technology have fallen significantly.

    "We realized we could build it far more cheaply today," he said. "Not much changed in the technology
    itself. What happened was the cost of manufacturing changed."

    Today, he said, the technology is beginning to appear in the consumer market, both in wearable
    systems and in some cars, like certain models of the Cadillac with systems that project driving
    information onto the windshield.

    But Motion Research will be the first company to attempt a truly low-cost consumer application. The
    price of the motorcycle Sportvue will be from $249 to $349.

    The bicycle version of Sportvue, which will be introduced sometime after the motorcycle system, will
    project speed, distance traveled and heart rate information, like current cyclometers, and be from
    $150 to $199, Mr. Dobson said. He said the company was also in discussions with helmet manufacturers
    to integrate the display systems into helmets.

    Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company
     
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  2. Clovis Lark wrote:

    > The design, based on a patent co-developed by Tom Furness, one of the pioneers of head-mounted
    > display technology, uses a lens and mirror and backlit liquid crystal display to give the viewer
    > the illusion that the information displayed in the periphery of one eye is projected in the
    > distance.

    I remember Tom Furness giving a presentation way back in 1991 in New Orleans. He talked about this
    heads-up display technology back then, exclusively for military use. The thing I remember about his
    presentation was talking about alarms.

    The problem they were having was that when an alarm went off, it was generally so distracting for
    the pilot that it interfered with their decision making process and often they took an action that
    made the problem worse.

    The solution they adopted was to get (in some cases) the daughter of the pilot to record various
    warning messages and to play these back instead of the corresponding alarms. He made the contention
    that it was far more compelling for apilot to hear "Daddy, your port engine is on fire" than it was
    to hear a crashing siren.

    We need this for bike racing.

    Suggested examples: "Daddy, the break has gone up the road." "....your left quadricep has a
    small tear."

    Note that having your spouse record the message is generally not so motivational. "Honey, you know
    that thing at the back where the chain goes? Well, it isn't working properly now."
     
  3. "Clovis Lark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Today, he said, the technology is beginning to appear in the consumer market, both in wearable
    > systems and in some cars, like certain models of the Cadillac with systems that project driving
    > information onto the windshield.
    >
    > But Motion Research will be the first company to attempt a truly low-cost consumer application.
    > The price of the motorcycle Sportvue will be from $249 to $349.
    >
    > The bicycle version of Sportvue, which will be introduced sometime after the motorcycle system,
    > will project speed, distance traveled and heart rate information, like current cyclometers, and be
    > from $150 to $199, Mr. Dobson said. He said the company was also in discussions with helmet
    > manufacturers to integrate the display systems into helmets.

    Dumbass -

    I predict that Manolo Saiz's team will be the first to integrate this technology into the peloton.
    Surely his riders will be ecstatic at the prospect of video featuring Saiz screaming:

    VENGA! VENGA! VENGA! VENGA!

    being beamed into their heads-up display.

    The world will never be the same.
     
  4. Clovis Lark

    Clovis Lark Guest

    Stewart Fleming <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Clovis Lark wrote:

    >> The design, based on a patent co-developed by Tom Furness, one of the pioneers of head-mounted
    >> display technology, uses a lens and mirror and backlit liquid crystal display to give the viewer
    >> the illusion that the information displayed in the periphery of one eye is projected in the
    >> distance.

    > I remember Tom Furness giving a presentation way back in 1991 in New Orleans. He talked about this
    > heads-up display technology back then, exclusively for military use. The thing I remember about
    > his presentation was talking about alarms.

    > The problem they were having was that when an alarm went off, it was generally so distracting for
    > the pilot that it interfered with their decision making process and often they took an action that
    > made the problem worse.

    > The solution they adopted was to get (in some cases) the daughter of the pilot to record various
    > warning messages and to play these back instead of the corresponding alarms. He made the
    > contention that it was far more compelling for apilot to hear "Daddy, your port engine is on fire"
    > than it was to hear a crashing siren.

    > We need this for bike racing.

    > Suggested examples: "Daddy, the break has gone up the road." "....your left quadricep has a
    > small tear."

    > Note that having your spouse record the message is generally not so motivational. "Honey, you know
    > that thing at the back where the chain goes? Well, it isn't working properly now."

    On the other hand, a baritone female spousal voice enhanced by years of Jim Bean and tempered with
    a lifetime of unfiltered Camels sweetly bellowing, "Luther, you bring home enough for me to keep
    the lights on!" might provoke acceellerations that would have doping control going apeshit at the
    finish line.
     
  5. TritonRider

    TritonRider Guest

    >From: "Kurgan Gringioni" [email protected]

    >Dumbass -
    >
    >
    >I predict that Manolo Saiz's team will be the first to integrate this technology into the peloton.
    >Surely his riders will be ecstatic at the prospect of video featuring Saiz screaming:
    >
    >VENGA! VENGA! VENGA! VENGA!
    >
    >being beamed into their heads-up display.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >The world will never be the same.
    >
    >
    Possibly incorporating one of those electric shock dog collars so that the rider gets a shock every
    time "Venga" comes up in the communications system. Just to provide encouragement of course.

    Bill C
     
  6. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    Imagine what Cipo will have beamed to his heads-up display (pun intended).

    "TritonRider" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    m17.aol.com...
    > >From: "Kurgan Gringioni" [email protected]
    >
    > >Dumbass -
    > >
    > >
    > >I predict that Manolo Saiz's team will be the first to integrate this technology into the
    > >peloton. Surely his riders will be ecstatic at the prospect of video featuring Saiz screaming:
    > >
    > >VENGA! VENGA! VENGA! VENGA!
    > >
    > >being beamed into their heads-up display.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >The world will never be the same.
    > >
    > >
    > Possibly incorporating one of those electric shock dog collars so that
    the
    > rider gets a shock every time "Venga" comes up in the communications
    system.
    > Just to provide encouragement of course.
    >
    > Bill C
     
  7. Hops

    Hops Guest

    Clovis Lark <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >December 8, 2003 Heads-Up Displays Move From Cockpits to Cyclists' Helmets By JOHN MARKOFF
    >
    >AN FRANCISCO, Dec. 7 - Fighter pilots have long been able to view flight data projected onto jet
    >windshields within their line of sight. Soon recreational motorcyclists and bicyclists will be able
    >to take advantage of that technology.

    Whatever happened to just riding a bike?? Hops
     
  8. Clovis Lark

    Clovis Lark Guest

    Hops <@.net.nz> wrote:

    > Clovis Lark <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>December 8, 2003 Heads-Up Displays Move From Cockpits to Cyclists' Helmets By JOHN MARKOFF
    >>
    >>AN FRANCISCO, Dec. 7 - Fighter pilots have long been able to view flight data projected onto jet
    >>windshields within their line of sight. Soon recreational motorcyclists and bicyclists will be
    >>able to take advantage of that technology.

    > Whatever happened to just riding a bike?? Hops

    teevee?
     
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