Tektro brake lever problem (?)



M

Michael Press

Guest
A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
something about installing aero brake levers that I do
not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
than bending the cable as it pulls?

--
Michael Press
 
J

jim beam

Guest
Michael Press wrote:
> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> than bending the cable as it pulls?
>

if it really is bending the cable as it pulls, that is a fundamental
problem and guaranteed to cause fatigue. you could try using a higher
quality cable less prone to fatigue, like genuine campy or shimano, but
this will only buy you an extended change interval, not solve the problem.

best solution, imo, is to use the genuine campy levers of this style.
significantly more expensive of course, but what worth is your personal
safety?
 
L

landotter

Guest
On Oct 14, 4:51 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> than bending the cable as it pulls?
>
> --
> Michael Press


[gets up and checks r200as on fixed gear bike]

They look to pull the cable straight on this bike, It's got 3K on the
cables, and another bike I sold had them as well, probably around 5K
on those cables. It certainly could be a burr or something where the
'bulb' interfaces, so clean it up with a round file or suitable
equivalent.

If you've been sourcing the cable from the same place, try a different
brand--these levers aren't anything radical and certainly shouldn't be
eating cables.
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>
,
landotter <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Oct 14, 4:51 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> > A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> > and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> > They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> > cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> > cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> > the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> > pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> > Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> > something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> > not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> > breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> > to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> > levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> > than bending the cable as it pulls?
> >
> > --
> > Michael Press

>
> [gets up and checks r200as on fixed gear bike]
>
> They look to pull the cable straight on this bike, It's got 3K on the
> cables, and another bike I sold had them as well, probably around 5K
> on those cables. It certainly could be a burr or something where the
> 'bulb' interfaces, so clean it up with a round file or suitable
> equivalent.
>
> If you've been sourcing the cable from the same place, try a different
> brand--these levers aren't anything radical and certainly shouldn't be
> eating cables.


They should not, but there is a channel worn in the
hinged cable receiver indicating that it does
not pull the cable straight.

--
Michael Press
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
>> Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
>>> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
>>> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
>>> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
>>> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
>>> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
>>> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
>>> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
>>> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
>>> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
>>> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
>>> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
>>> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
>>> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
>>> than bending the cable as it pulls?


> landotter <[email protected]> wrote:
>> [gets up and checks r200as on fixed gear bike]
>> They look to pull the cable straight on this bike, It's got 3K on the
>> cables, and another bike I sold had them as well, probably around 5K
>> on those cables. It certainly could be a burr or something where the
>> 'bulb' interfaces, so clean it up with a round file or suitable
>> equivalent.
>> If you've been sourcing the cable from the same place, try a different
>> brand--these levers aren't anything radical and certainly shouldn't be
>> eating cables.


Michael Press wrote:
> They should not, but there is a channel worn in the
> hinged cable receiver indicating that it does
> not pull the cable straight.


It may not be the source of your wire fraying, but cable carriers inside
levers benefit from a drop of oil on either side. Quiets that annoying
'creak' noise.
--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>,
jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:

> Michael Press wrote:
> > A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> > and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> > They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> > cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> > cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> > the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> > pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> > Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> > something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> > not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> > breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> > to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> > levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> > than bending the cable as it pulls?
> >

> if it really is bending the cable as it pulls, that is a fundamental
> problem and guaranteed to cause fatigue. you could try using a higher
> quality cable less prone to fatigue, like genuine campy or shimano, but
> this will only buy you an extended change interval, not solve the problem.
>
> best solution, imo, is to use the genuine campy levers of this style.
> significantly more expensive of course, but what worth is your personal
> safety?


One-hundred-eighty dollars. Yes, that is more expensive.

--
Michael Press
 
J

jim beam

Guest
Michael Press wrote:
> In article
> <[email protected]>,
> jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Michael Press wrote:
>>> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
>>> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
>>> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
>>> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
>>> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
>>> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
>>> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
>>> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
>>> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
>>> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
>>> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
>>> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
>>> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
>>> than bending the cable as it pulls?
>>>

>> if it really is bending the cable as it pulls, that is a fundamental
>> problem and guaranteed to cause fatigue. you could try using a higher
>> quality cable less prone to fatigue, like genuine campy or shimano, but
>> this will only buy you an extended change interval, not solve the problem.
>>
>> best solution, imo, is to use the genuine campy levers of this style.
>> significantly more expensive of course, but what worth is your personal
>> safety?

>
> One-hundred-eighty dollars. Yes, that is more expensive.
>


how much is your medical insurance?
 
On Oct 14, 2:51 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> than bending the cable as it pulls?


I haven't used these particular levers. I've not had
that problem with aero levers. Are you sure that the
cable housing is installed as far as possible into
the lever body? Maybe it got pulled out in the
process of taping it onto the bars. It might help
to install a lever with the hood off and operate
it, if you can see inside (but it might not). Is the
cylinder that receives the bulb end free to pivot?
It is on more or less every lever I've used.

It shouldn't be incredibly hard to find a decent pair
of Shimano aero levers for much cheaper than new
Campy levers, if you are willing to use one of
the eight zillion pairs that were taken off bikes
to install STIs.

Ben
 
J

jim beam

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> On Oct 14, 2:51 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
>> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
>> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
>> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
>> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
>> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
>> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
>> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
>> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
>> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
>> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
>> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
>> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
>> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
>> than bending the cable as it pulls?

>
> I haven't used these particular levers. I've not had
> that problem with aero levers. Are you sure that the
> cable housing is installed as far as possible into
> the lever body? Maybe it got pulled out in the
> process of taping it onto the bars. It might help
> to install a lever with the hood off and operate
> it, if you can see inside (but it might not). Is the
> cylinder that receives the bulb end free to pivot?
> It is on more or less every lever I've used.
>
> It shouldn't be incredibly hard to find a decent pair
> of Shimano aero levers for much cheaper than new
> Campy levers, if you are willing to use one of
> the eight zillion pairs that were taken off bikes
> to install STIs.
>
> Ben
>


you need campy-style levers if you have campy calipers though - it
contains the quick-release mechanism.
 
On Oct 14, 2:51 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> than bending the cable as it pulls?


I haven't used these particular levers. I've not had
that problem with aero levers. Are you sure that the
cable housing is installed as far as possible into
the lever body? Maybe it got pulled out in the
process of taping it onto the bars. It might help
to install a lever with the hood off and operate
it, if you can see inside (but it might not). Is the
cylinder that receives the bulb end free to pivot?
It is on more or less every lever I've used.

It shouldn't be incredibly hard to find a decent pair
of Shimano aero levers for much cheaper than new
Campy levers, if you are willing to use one of
the eight zillion pairs that were taken off bikes
to install STIs.

Ben
 
A

Andrew Martin

Guest
On Oct 14, 5:31 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> In article
> <[email protected]>
> ,
>
>
>
>
>
> landotter <[email protected]> wrote:
> > On Oct 14, 4:51 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> > > A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> > > and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> > > They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> > > cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> > > cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> > > the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> > > pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> > > Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> > > something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> > > not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> > > breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> > > to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> > > levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> > > than bending the cable as it pulls?

>
> > > --
> > > Michael Press

>
> > [gets up and checks r200as on fixed gear bike]

>
> > They look to pull the cable straight on this bike, It's got 3K on the
> > cables, and another bike I sold had them as well, probably around 5K
> > on those cables. It certainly could be a burr or something where the
> > 'bulb' interfaces, so clean it up with a round file or suitable
> > equivalent.

>
> > If you've been sourcing the cable from the same place, try a different
> > brand--these levers aren't anything radical and certainly shouldn't be
> > eating cables.

>
> They should not, but there is a channel worn in the
> hinged cable receiver indicating that it does
> not pull the cable straight.
>
> --
> Michael Press- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


I have those Tektros and have not had an issue. I checked the cables
last night for wear, and both appear fine. Perhaps they are somehow
not getting seated properly?
 
B

Booker Bense

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
>A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
>and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.


Something is wrong with either your installation or
the levers. I have those levers on two of my bikes
and have had no problems.

_ Booker C. Bense
 
On Oct 15, 7:06 am, jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > On Oct 14, 2:51 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> >> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> >> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> >> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> >> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> >> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> >> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> >> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> >> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> >> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> >> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> >> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> >> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> >> than bending the cable as it pulls?

>
> > I haven't used these particular levers. I've not had
> > that problem with aero levers. Are you sure that the
> > cable housing is installed as far as possible into
> > the lever body? Maybe it got pulled out in the
> > process of taping it onto the bars. It might help
> > to install a lever with the hood off and operate
> > it, if you can see inside (but it might not). Is the
> > cylinder that receives the bulb end free to pivot?
> > It is on more or less every lever I've used.

>
> > It shouldn't be incredibly hard to find a decent pair
> > of Shimano aero levers for much cheaper than new
> > Campy levers, if you are willing to use one of
> > the eight zillion pairs that were taken off bikes
> > to install STIs.

>
> > Ben

>
> you need campy-style levers if you have campy calipers though - it
> contains the quick-release mechanism.


You don't necessarily need a quick release unless you use tires that
are much wider than the rims, or you want the pads to be almost
touching the rims. You can pretty much install or remove most wheels w/
o opening the quick release just by giving them a gentle push.

Andres
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>
,
"[email protected]" <[email protected]>
wrote:

> On Oct 14, 2:51 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> > A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> > and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> > They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> > cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> > cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> > the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> > pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> > Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> > something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> > not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> > breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> > to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> > levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> > than bending the cable as it pulls?

>
> I haven't used these particular levers. I've not had
> that problem with aero levers. Are you sure that the
> cable housing is installed as far as possible into
> the lever body? Maybe it got pulled out in the
> process of taping it onto the bars. It might help
> to install a lever with the hood off and operate
> it, if you can see inside (but it might not). Is the
> cylinder that receives the bulb end free to pivot?
> It is on more or less every lever I've used.


I greased the cable receiver pivots. These levers are
pulling single pivot calipers so they get hauled on.
There was some warning to me as the amount of slack
pull increased unreasonably. It was while investigating
that the cables snapped. We shall see.

> It shouldn't be incredibly hard to find a decent pair
> of Shimano aero levers for much cheaper than new
> Campy levers, if you are willing to use one of
> the eight zillion pairs that were taken off bikes
> to install STIs.


I have Shimano on another bicycle, but prefer the
Tektro for the big fat body. A reoccurrence may induce
me to swap the Tektros to the bicycle with the dual
pivot brakes. That would be fun. Cheap Tektros on a
spiffy sport frame with skads of high-zoot equipment.

--
Michael Press
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>
,
"[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Oct 15, 7:06 am, jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:
> > [email protected] wrote:
> > > On Oct 14, 2:51 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> > >> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> > >> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> > >> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> > >> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> > >> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> > >> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> > >> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> > >> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> > >> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> > >> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> > >> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> > >> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> > >> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> > >> than bending the cable as it pulls?

> >
> > > I haven't used these particular levers. I've not had
> > > that problem with aero levers. Are you sure that the
> > > cable housing is installed as far as possible into
> > > the lever body? Maybe it got pulled out in the
> > > process of taping it onto the bars. It might help
> > > to install a lever with the hood off and operate
> > > it, if you can see inside (but it might not). Is the
> > > cylinder that receives the bulb end free to pivot?
> > > It is on more or less every lever I've used.

> >
> > > It shouldn't be incredibly hard to find a decent pair
> > > of Shimano aero levers for much cheaper than new
> > > Campy levers, if you are willing to use one of
> > > the eight zillion pairs that were taken off bikes
> > > to install STIs.

> >
> > > Ben

> >
> > you need campy-style levers if you have campy calipers though - it
> > contains the quick-release mechanism.

>
> You don't necessarily need a quick release unless you use tires that
> are much wider than the rims, or you want the pads to be almost
> touching the rims. You can pretty much install or remove most wheels w/
> o opening the quick release just by giving them a gentle push.


Yes, that is how it works for me. Even 28 mm measured tires
can be popped in and out.

--
Michael Press
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>
,
Andrew Martin <[email protected]>
wrote:

> On Oct 14, 5:31 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> > In article
> > <[email protected]>
> > ,
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > landotter <[email protected]> wrote:
> > > On Oct 14, 4:51 pm, Michael Press <[email protected]> wrote:
> > > > A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> > > > and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> > > > They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> > > > cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> > > > cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> > > > the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> > > > pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> > > > Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> > > > something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> > > > not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> > > > breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> > > > to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> > > > levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> > > > than bending the cable as it pulls?

> >
> > > [gets up and checks r200as on fixed gear bike]

> >
> > > They look to pull the cable straight on this bike, It's got 3K on the
> > > cables, and another bike I sold had them as well, probably around 5K
> > > on those cables. It certainly could be a burr or something where the
> > > 'bulb' interfaces, so clean it up with a round file or suitable
> > > equivalent.

> >
> > > If you've been sourcing the cable from the same place, try a different
> > > brand--these levers aren't anything radical and certainly shouldn't be
> > > eating cables.

> >
> > They should not, but there is a channel worn in the
> > hinged cable receiver indicating that it does
> > not pull the cable straight.


> I have those Tektros and have not had an issue. I checked the cables
> last night for wear, and both appear fine. Perhaps they are somehow
> not getting seated properly?


Properly seated. I greased the cable receiver pivots
and will watch what happens. The worn groove should
not be there if the receivers pivot properly.

--
Michael Press
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>,
jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:

> Michael Press wrote:
> > In article
> > <[email protected]>,
> > jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >> Michael Press wrote:
> >>> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> >>> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> >>> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> >>> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> >>> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> >>> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> >>> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> >>> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> >>> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> >>> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> >>> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> >>> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> >>> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> >>> than bending the cable as it pulls?
> >>>
> >> if it really is bending the cable as it pulls, that is a fundamental
> >> problem and guaranteed to cause fatigue. you could try using a higher
> >> quality cable less prone to fatigue, like genuine campy or shimano, but
> >> this will only buy you an extended change interval, not solve the problem.
> >>
> >> best solution, imo, is to use the genuine campy levers of this style.
> >> significantly more expensive of course, but what worth is your personal
> >> safety?

> >
> > One-hundred-eighty dollars. Yes, that is more expensive.

>
> how much is your medical insurance?


You questioned my choice of Campagnolo 1010 dropouts in
<[email protected]>

Now you invoke the hard sell for Campagnolo brake levers.
Do you earn a livelihood as a salesman?

--
Michael Press
 
J

Jambo

Guest
"Michael Press" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> You questioned my choice of Campagnolo 1010 dropouts in
> <[email protected]>
>
> Now you invoke the hard sell for Campagnolo brake levers.
> Do you earn a livelihood as a salesman?


Nah, beamboy's just being a contrarian despite the facts.

Hey beamboy, got an example yet of a structure using composite adhesives as
the main load bearing component? What about composite adhesives that last
as long as metals?

And, uh, what about an aerospace company using the sound of breaking CF as
damage inspection technique?

Idiot.
 
J

jim beam

Guest
Michael Press wrote:
> In article
> <[email protected]>,
> jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Michael Press wrote:
>>> In article
>>> <[email protected]>,
>>> jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Michael Press wrote:
>>>>> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
>>>>> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
>>>>> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
>>>>> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
>>>>> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
>>>>> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
>>>>> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
>>>>> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
>>>>> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
>>>>> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
>>>>> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
>>>>> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
>>>>> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
>>>>> than bending the cable as it pulls?
>>>>>
>>>> if it really is bending the cable as it pulls, that is a fundamental
>>>> problem and guaranteed to cause fatigue. you could try using a higher
>>>> quality cable less prone to fatigue, like genuine campy or shimano, but
>>>> this will only buy you an extended change interval, not solve the problem.
>>>>
>>>> best solution, imo, is to use the genuine campy levers of this style.
>>>> significantly more expensive of course, but what worth is your personal
>>>> safety?
>>> One-hundred-eighty dollars. Yes, that is more expensive.

>> how much is your medical insurance?

>
> You questioned my choice of Campagnolo 1010 dropouts in
> <[email protected]>
>
> Now you invoke the hard sell for Campagnolo brake levers.
> Do you earn a livelihood as a salesman?
>


do you always take things so personally? are you not an autonomous
adult capable of making your own decisions?

if you're having failures - you allege that it's a cable routing problem
- and if the levers are defective, then use something /known/ to be
good. campy are a solution that are /known/ to be good /and/ they also
accommodate calipers without their own q.r. mechanism. simple.

to put it another way however, if you don't want answers, why ask questions?
 
M

Michael Press

Guest
In article
<[email protected]>,
jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:

> Michael Press wrote:
> > In article
> > <[email protected]>,
> > jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >> Michael Press wrote:
> >>> In article
> >>> <[email protected]>,
> >>> jim beam <[email protected]> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> Michael Press wrote:
> >>>>> A few months ago I installed Tektro R200A brake levers
> >>>>> and new cables. Yesterday both brake cables broke.
> >>>>> They broke at the plane between the bulb and the
> >>>>> cylinder of the end piece. The hinged reciever for the
> >>>>> cable end piece is chafed by the cable indicating that
> >>>>> the brake lever mechanism bends the cable rather than
> >>>>> pulling the cable straight out of the cable housing.
> >>>>> Are these levers a bad design? Perhaps there is
> >>>>> something about installing aero brake levers that I do
> >>>>> not understand. I cannot continue with a system that
> >>>>> breaks brake cables every few months, and I do not want
> >>>>> to put back the old style levers. Will I have to buy
> >>>>> levers that actually pull the cable straight rather
> >>>>> than bending the cable as it pulls?
> >>>>>
> >>>> if it really is bending the cable as it pulls, that is a fundamental
> >>>> problem and guaranteed to cause fatigue. you could try using a higher
> >>>> quality cable less prone to fatigue, like genuine campy or shimano, but
> >>>> this will only buy you an extended change interval, not solve the problem.
> >>>>
> >>>> best solution, imo, is to use the genuine campy levers of this style.
> >>>> significantly more expensive of course, but what worth is your personal
> >>>> safety?
> >>> One-hundred-eighty dollars. Yes, that is more expensive.
> >> how much is your medical insurance?

> >
> > You questioned my choice of Campagnolo 1010 dropouts in
> > <[email protected]>
> >
> > Now you invoke the hard sell for Campagnolo brake levers.
> > Do you earn a livelihood as a salesman?
> >

>
> do you always take things so personally?


Yes, I take everything personally.

> are you not an autonomous
> adult capable of making your own decisions?


Good one. What do you think?

> if you're having failures - you allege


I alleged nothing. Described events, reported observations,
relayed a thought or two, asked for help.

> that it's a cable routing problem
> - and if the levers are defective, then use something /known/ to be
> good. campy are a solution that are /known/ to be good /and/ they also
> accommodate calipers without their own q.r. mechanism. simple.


Do not know yet if they are defective.
Experience here is uniformly positive.

> to put it another way however, if you don't want answers, why ask questions?


All this because I said
"One-hundred-eighty dollars. Yes, that is more expensive."

Have you ever earned a livelihood as a salesman?

--
Michael Press