Tektro Brakes

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by robertpalmer, Mar 17, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. robertpalmer

    robertpalmer Guest

    I bought my two daughters Raleigh M-80 mountain bikes, which are equipped with Tektro brakes.
    I'll be damned if I can keep them adjusted correctly. I realize these are far from good units,
    but anybody have any suggestions until I can justify plunking down for some Avids? Thanks in
    advance. Rob
     
    Tags:


  2. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I bought my two daughters Raleigh M-80 mountain bikes, which are equipped with Tektro brakes. I'll
    > be damned if I can keep them adjusted correctly.

    What seems to be the problem? Are they hitting the tires? Not making full contact with the
    sidewalls? Squealing under braking power? Just not very powerful?

    Toe-in is kinda tricky with any canti or v-brake. Too much, and you have almost no braking power.
    Too little, and they s-q-u-e-e-e-e-l on every stop.

    If they're coming out of adjustment, then you're probably not tightening them enough and they're
    slipping out of adjustment under braking force. Sound about right?

    > I realize these are far from good units, but anybody have any suggestions until I can justify
    > plunking down for some Avids?

    Honestly, I have never had any problems with cheap V-brakes. The Tektro units seem to be very well
    made, as do the ProMax and other low-end brands I've seen. All low-end V-brakes are much simpler to
    adjust than *any* cantilever brakes that I've ever encountered (including XTR, Machine Tech, etc).

    Try tightening the pads down so they can just barely move with your fingers, then clamp a dime under
    the rear-pointing end of each pad as you squeeze the brake lever (might need a friend to help). If
    there's enough slack in the pad tension, the pads will toe-in a little. You might have to help the
    pads a little to get them to toe-in. Tighten down the pads. Get them nice and snug, and apply finger
    pressure to counter the torquing force of tightening down the pads (quite tricky at times). When you
    have them reasonably well aligned, try the brakes in a safe slow ride. Any better?

    Keep at it. I don't think Avid's will be much easier.

    -Barry
     
  3. Iguana Bwana

    Iguana Bwana Guest

    On Mon, 17 Mar 2003 20:53:59 -0600 (CST), [email protected] wrote:

    >I bought my two daughters Raleigh M-80 mountain bikes, which are equipped with Tektro brakes. I'll
    >be damned if I can keep them adjusted correctly.

    http://www.tektro.com and look for the Tektro .pdfs outlining their brake setup & adjustment. You
    might also read Barnetts Manual chapters 34, 35, & 36.

    If you can't be bothered doing that, take them to your LBS and pay them to adjust the
    brakes for you.

    > realize these are far from good units,

    There's nothing wrong with Tektro V-brakes. They make a couple of different models, and they work
    just fine. As good as my Deores and better than Lee Chi which are proprietary branded OEM on many a
    brand slut's <insert preferred name brand> bike. Or was my controlled 1500ft descent down a mountain
    last weekend just a figment of my imagination?

    >suggestions until I can justify plunking down for some Avids?

    Of course, you could just make sure the Tektros are adjusted correctly and running decent pads on
    clean surfaced rims instead. Avids are also good, but they make several different model V-brakes and
    levers too and they aren't some sort of fix all magic solution. A poorly adjusted V-brake on a dirty
    rim will always work like shit compared to the converse.

    Truth is, probably best you plunk down the $$$ on some Avids now. Although they won't brake
    any better unless you get the workshop to fit and adjust them for you, you'll undoubedly feel
    much happier.

    Iguana Bwana
     
  4. S. Bourne

    S. Bourne Guest

    Maybe they were not set up right to begin with. Try removing the arms, greasing the bosses and
    setting them up with higher spring tension. See the three holes below the boss? Back when I was
    assembling these very bikes, I found that often the softer setting were used resulting in what we
    called "lame action." Stan
     
  5. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I bought my two daughters Raleigh M-80 mountain bikes, which are equipped with Tektro brakes. I'll
    > be damned if I can keep them adjusted correctly. I realize these are far from good units, but
    > anybody have any suggestions until I can justify plunking down for some Avids?

    The shoes wander? The cable loosens? The brake will not stay centered? Most brake issues like those
    are ameliorated with lubrication. Brake shoe bolts/nuts and toeing washers, cable anchor bolts,
    pivots and the ends of the springs ( which slide along the peg on the arm) all need a spot of oil in
    order to work right, torque properly and come apart again some day! Centering, especially, is more
    predicatble when the parts are not sticky!

    Tektro is a first-rate brake manufacturer. Although you may get more compliments from more expensive
    units, I am not convinced you get better braking.
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "S. Bourne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Maybe they were not set up right to begin with. Try removing the arms, greasing the bosses and
    > setting them up with higher spring tension. See the three holes below the boss? Back when I was
    > assembling these very bikes, I found that often the softer setting were
    used
    > resulting in what we called "lame action."

    Formerly the action was between the frame's boss and the bronze sleeve in the arm. In the good old
    days lubrication as you describe was simple and effective.

    Modern linear brakes are stamped together such that the motion is bewteen the bronze liner and a
    steel sleeve. This change saved factory assembly time and quickly became ubiquitous. It is really
    difficult to separate the parts to lube them and even more difficult to separate corroded
    arms/sleeves to make them work once more. This is progress?

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  7. KevSum

    KevSum New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2003
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am having a problem adjusting the rear Promax brake on my sons Saracen Mantra. Looking from behind at the rear wheel the left arm barely moves, the right arm moves a lot and in fact will foul on the large tyre. I have adjusted the bottom screws in the plastic mount, tried different cable lengths, but nothing will seem to make the left arm move! Any ideas appreciated ....
     
  8. Cbike

    Cbike Guest

    Take the brake arms off the bike, take the brake apart and grease all of the parts then reassemble.
    This normally cures the slugish movement. This is a consistent problem with Promax. Charlie
     
  9. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "CBike" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Take the brake arms off the bike, take the brake apart and grease all of
    the
    > parts then reassemble. This normally cures the slugish movement. This is a consistent problem
    > with Promax.

    Right you are.

    If the bicycle has seen salt water, you may have to disassemble the pivot itself to remove the
    corrosion between the bronze bushing and the steel sleeve. Clean all parts with emery cloth and
    grease all before reassembly. A small arbor or a bench vise is handy to press the sleeves out.

    At one time the movement was between the frame's brake boss and the sleeve in the brake arm. That
    joint was easy to lubricate and conscientious bicycle shop builders did just that. As with so many
    modern time-saving "innovations" [see concurrent thread about threadless steerers] linear brakes are
    now pressed together so the factory assembler can manage many more per hour as they no longer need
    to position the spring separately. This makes lubrication virtually inpossible without a major time
    commitment so it does not get done nowadays.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...