Tell me about REFRIED BEANS

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by <Rj>, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. <Rj>

    <Rj> Guest

    That mound of brick-colored mush that appears on my plate in
    Mexican restaurants......

    I understand it's cooked, mashed beans with spices, and
    sauteed onions mixed in.

    But why lard ? Why is it "fried".... or re-fried ? ( when
    would it be re-fried ? )

    Do either of these enhance the taste ? It's not like they're
    making fried bean patties.

    I've tasted ( Old El Paso ) refried beans, both with
    and without the lard..... I couldn't tell the
    difference in taste.

    ?? <rj
     
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  2. Chillled

    Chillled Guest

    wrote:

    > Why is it "fried".... or re-fried ? ( when would it be re-
    > fried ? )

    I believe refrito does not mean "re-fried," rather
    "very fried."
     
  3. Tex Mexican

    Tex Mexican Guest

    "chillled" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > wrote:
    >
    > > Why is it "fried".... or re-fried ? ( when would it be
    > > re-fried ? )
    >
    > I believe refrito does not mean "re-fried," rather
    > "very fried."
    >
    Please do not misinform about the word refrito. It is a
    gringo term for refried. The correct term is refritas which
    means "Now fried".
     
  4. Jimlane

    Jimlane Guest

    <RJ> wrote:

    > That mound of brick-colored mush that appears on my plate
    > in Mexican restaurants......
    >
    > I understand it's cooked, mashed beans with spices, and
    > sauteed onions mixed in.
    >
    > But why lard ? Why is it "fried".... or re-fried ? ( when
    > would it be re-fried ? )
    >
    > Do either of these enhance the taste ? It's not like
    > they're making fried bean patties.
    >
    > I've tasted ( Old El Paso ) refried beans, both with
    > and without the lard..... I couldn't tell the
    > difference in taste.
    >
    > ?? <rj>

    First, the beans are boiled, then mashed and fried. They are
    cooked twice. Lard is the traditional fat. Health concerns
    drove the US away from using lard In fact, when I was
    growing up some 50+ years ago, donuts were cooked in lard.
    Many places in Mexico substitute other fats for lard when
    making their refrieds.

    I haven't seen the OEP with lard in them so cannot comment
    on the taste. I have had the non-lard ones and they are
    boring. But when I run into refrieds in Mexico the
    difference is usually quite noticeable.

    BTW, adding some instant coffee to a can of refrieds will
    give them a deeper, smokier flavor that comes closer to
    the taste of the larded refrieds. I read about this
    sometime back in the late 60s or early 70s and used
    Folger's Coffee Crystals. I don't use decaf, so do not
    know how that would work.

    jim
     
  5. Tex Mexican

    Tex Mexican Guest

    "<RJ>" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > That mound of brick-colored mush that appears on my plate
    > in Mexican restaurants......
    >
    > I understand it's cooked, mashed beans with spices, and
    > sauteed onions mixed in.
    >
    > But why lard ? Why is it "fried".... or re-fried ? ( when
    > would it be re-fried ? )
    >
    > Do either of these enhance the taste ? It's not like
    > they're making fried bean patties.
    >
    > I've tasted ( Old El Paso ) refried beans, both with
    > and without the lard..... I couldn't tell the
    > difference in taste.
    >
    Frijole's Refritas means beans now fried. Beans are made in
    bulk by stewing and are left on the stove uncovered for
    days. When you want to eat some, you heat some lard in a
    frying pan till smoking and add some beans.
    1/2 cup lard to cook six cups of stewed beans is typical.
    Heat till boiling and stir, scraping pan bottom, for 5
    minutes. This kills any bacteria present and reduces the
    beans to the "mush" you refer to. Really good now fried
    beans are made when the stewed beans are just starting to
    get sour in the pot.
     
  6. Chillled

    Chillled Guest

    Tex Mexican wrote:

    > "chillled" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    >
    >> wrote:

    >>>Why is it "fried".... or re-fried ? ( when would it be
    >>>re-fried ? )

    >>I believe refrito does not mean "re-fried," rather
    >>"very fried."

    > Please do not misinform about the word refrito. It is a
    > gringo term for refried. The correct term is refritas
    > which means "Now fried".

    According to my Diccionario Larousse,

    refrito, ta adj. Muy frito, frito de nuevo.

    I confess I'm a gringa, still, I'm pretty sure muy frito
    means very fried.
     
  7. "Tex Mexican" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Frijole's Refritas means beans now fried.

    N.b. The correct spelling = frijoles refritos, which is
    masculine plural.

    In my opinion, the most accurate translation would be
    "thoroughly fried beans." See the second definition below,
    indicating a large amount of frying.

    Refrito, ta: adj. Refried (frito de nuevo). Over fried
    (demasiado frito). Fig. and fam., Rehash: Esta obra de
    teatro es un refrito, this play is a rehash. (Larousse
    "DICCIONARIO MODERNO: español-inglés inglés-español)

    Derek Juhl
     
  8. PENMART01 wrote:
    >>(Derek N.P.F. Juhl)
    >
    >
    >>"Tex Mexican wrote:[email protected]>...
    >>
    >>
    >>>Frijole's Refritas means beans now fried.
    >>
    >>N.b. The correct spelling = frijoles refritos, which is
    >> masculine plural.
    >>
    >>In my opinion, the most accurate translation would be
    >>"thoroughly fried beans." See the second definition below,
    >>indicating a large amount of frying.
    >>
    >>Refrito, ta: adj. Refried (frito de nuevo). Over fried
    >>(demasiado frito). Fig. and fam., Rehash: Esta obra de
    >>teatro es un refrito, this play is a rehash. (Larousse
    >>"DICCIONARIO MODERNO: español-inglés inglés-español)
    >>
    >>Derek Juhl
    >
    >
    > I've been told that in Mexican Spanish the idiomatic
    > preface "re" means "extra good" or "special"... obviously
    > refried beans are not fried twice. There is no word
    > "refrito" in Castillion Spanish.
    >
    > ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move
    > UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life
    > would be devoid of all meaning were it without
    > tribulation."
    >
    Re is used by the many various cultures and people (notice I
    say this because your average American/Canadian/Et cetera
    thinks all people that speak Spanish are the same thing, and
    that can be likened to all people that speak English) of
    Spanish speaking countries to give it extra oomph. Refrito,
    is one of the few words that are not used in regular Spanish
    scatology (which I know Sheldon would get a great kick at.)

    R

    --
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    ----------

    Dum spiro, spero. (Cicero) As long as I breathe, I hope.
     
  9. My dear Sheldon; don't tell me you are getting dull on me?

    Rich

    PENMART01 wrote:
    >>Richard Periut wrote:
    >>
    >>PENMART01 wrote:
    >>
    >>>>(Derek N.P.F. Juhl) "Tex Mexican wrote0:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Frijole's Refritas means beans now fried.
    >>>>
    >>>>N.b. The correct spelling = frijoles refritos, which is
    >>>> masculine plural.
    >>>>
    >>>>In my opinion, the most accurate translation would be
    >>>>"thoroughly fried beans." See the second definition
    >>>>below, indicating a large amount of frying.
    >>>>
    >>>>Refrito, ta: adj. Refried (frito de nuevo). Over fried
    >>>>(demasiado frito). Fig. and fam., Rehash: Esta obra de
    >>>>teatro es un refrito, this play is a rehash. (Larousse
    >>>>"DICCIONARIO MODERNO: español-inglés inglés-español)
    >>>>
    >>>>Derek Juhl
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I've been told that in Mexican Spanish the idiomatic
    >>>preface "re" means
    >>
    >>"extra
    >>
    >>>good" or "special"... obviously refried beans are not
    >>>fried twice. There
    >>
    >>is no
    >>
    >>>word "refrito" in Castillion Spanish.
    >>
    >>
    >>Re is used by the many various cultures and people (notice
    >>I say this because your average American/Canadian/Et
    >>cetera thinks all people that speak Spanish are the same
    >>thing, and that can be likened to all people that speak
    >>English) of Spanish speaking countries to give it extra
    >>oomph. Refrito, is one of the few words that are not used
    >>in regular Spanish scatology (which I know Sheldon would
    >>get a great kick at.)
    >
    >
    > Huh... one hundred words, saying absolutely nada.
    >
    > ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move
    > UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life
    > would be devoid of all meaning were it without
    > tribulation."
     
  10. "Tex Mexican" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Pendco

    ¿Pendejo? Perdóneme.

    Ud. escribió, "Please do not misinform about the word
    refrito" y "The correct term is refritas." Si Ud. quiere
    corregir la gramática, debe asegurar que tiene razón, para
    que pueda aprender la persona no hispanohablante, ¿verdad?

    [Obscenity]? I beg your pardon.

    You wrote, "Please do not misinform about the word refrito"
    and "The correct term is refritas." If you want to correct
    grammar, you should be sure that you're right, so that the
    non-Spanish-speaking person can learn, eh?

    Spanish is not my native language, so feel free to correct
    any errors. ;-)

    Derek Juhl
     
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