Tendonitis help

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by Frieda, Mar 8, 2003.

  1. Frieda

    Frieda New Member

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    I need some reassurance/feedback/advice. Last year I crashed out of a race- it did some cartilage damage to my left knee but worse yet it set up a chronic case of patellar tendonitis in both knees. I ignored the pain and kept racing for two months but eventually I paid a high price- almost a year off my bike.

    Now the patellar tendonitis is better. I've only been riding about six weeks but I have developed quadricep tendonitis in one knee (I started slowly and worked up to 100 miles a week when it started to get bad). I don't want to ignore this because I'm worried about having to take another year off but at the same time I'm so frustrated that I could cry (and do on a regular basis). Orthopedic Surgeon keeps saying rest. Will I ever ride again? What sports can I do in the meantime that are safe? Can I hike or walk? Will working the legpress at the gym make it worse or better?
     
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  2. jeffnight

    jeffnight New Member

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    Re: Quadracep tendonitis.
    Massage is my suggestion. I've had quadracep tendonitis three years, and each time it cropped up due to overuse without the proper buildup - weights and high mileage. Once you're over the initial flare-up and inflammation (ibuprofen, rest, ice), I'd suggest seeing a good massage therapist who knows cyclist anatomy and how to work carefully around those tendons just above your knee. "Scar" tissue, or knotted muscle fibers essentially shorten the quad and put too much pressure on the tendons that insert into the knee, so straightening out those (three) quad muscles is really important. Start back slowly and expect some low-level pain and ache, but remember that you've got to ride through some discomfort before feeling that satisfying "itch" around the knee that means you're almost recovered. Good luck.
    PS: I've got my own case of patellar tendonitis going, I'd be happy to have some of your feedback for that -
     
  3. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs Guest

    Supplements such as shark cartilage, chondrointin, and glucosamine contain nutrients essential in joint repair that your body, as an adult, no longer manufactures. It wouldn't hurt to use that stuff.
     
  4. pbentley

    pbentley New Member

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    I came across your query on cyclingforums in researching what I believe is my own case of quadricep tendonitis. I battled for six months a year ago with ITBS in my left knee. After racing most of last season, I took a few months off. I've been training fairly hard --weights and cycling -- the past couple months and my right knee above and inside of the knee cap is quite painful when I ride. No pain when not riding. I'm curious if these symptoms mirror yours and what if anything has proven successful. I saw my massage therapist today as a starting point. Thanks, Philip Bentley.

     
  5. apolack1

    apolack1 New Member

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    because your quads are heavily used during cycling, you should be sure to stretch them often. While studies on the subject have offered contridictary results, i have found that improved flexibility leads to less injuries. Also, when lifting, make sure you work opposing muscle groups. in other words, dont work you quads and ignore the hamstrings. Muscle inbalances can cause injury as well.
     
  6. velomanct

    velomanct New Member

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    massage and stretching is very helpful. it got me riding again after 2 weeks off due to patellar tendonitis.
    i think i am going to go get another professional massage.
     
  7. Carrera

    Carrera New Member

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    The advice about glucosamine is worth bearing in mind. I've had back pain for the last 6 months and have gone on high doses of glucosamine (1,500 ml daily). It seems strange but my back pain seems to have diminished somewhat. However, glucosamine takes at least 5 weeks to have any effect as it builds up in the system.






     
  8. firegooroo

    firegooroo New Member

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    Like all other injuries that occur during athletics, one needs to consider physical therapy. (if you can afford it or covered by insurance) Additionally when trying to return to the sport its always a good idea to also consider some gym work to strengthen the area affected. Being that you injured your knee perhaps slowly and lightly starting with closed chain excercise. One example of that is the leg press with minimal weight. To finish this process a good session of stretching is highly recommended to prevent any future injury.

    If you need more specifics don't hesitate to ask.
     
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