tendonitis

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Douglas, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. Douglas

    Douglas Guest

    T; The techniques do have a name "Myofascial or Active
    Release". After you stretch the tendon do you ice the area?
    Is the compensating musculature being treated as well? And
    if so, How? Yes : In Ontario we are taught to be able to
    treat tendonitis very effectively. There is a treatment (
    depending on which tendon ) called Friction Therapy. GL; D

    "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Is anyone familiar with the Muscle Release Technique? I am
    > treating my tendonitis with the stretches from this
    > technique, and it would boost my confidence if I could
    > find other people who successfully used this treatment.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > TG
     
    Tags:


  2. Terry Galan

    Terry Galan Guest

    D,
    The therapist who gave me the stretches specifically instructed me NOT to
    ice the area. He also said that these stretches treat carpal tunnel
    syndrome. There are two stretches, each bend the wrist in opposing
    directions with the elbow straightened. Each stretch is held for 2 seconds
    or less, while applying friction with knuckles or thumb from the other hand.
    Thanks for the info.
    TG
    "douglas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > T; The techniques do have a name "Myofascial or Active
    > Release". After you stretch the tendon do you ice the
    > area? Is the compensating musculature being treated as
    > well? And if so, How? Yes : In Ontario we are taught to be
    > able to treat tendonitis very effectively. There is a
    > treatment ( depending on which tendon ) called Friction
    > Therapy. GL; D
    >
    >
    > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Is anyone familiar with the Muscle Release Technique? I
    > > am treating my tendonitis with the stretches from this
    > > technique, and it would boost my confidence if I could
    > > find other people who successfully used this treatment.
    > >
    > > Thanks.
    > >
    > > TG
    > >
    >
     
  3. Douglas

    Douglas Guest

    T;

    After any/ALL Friction Therapy you must ice. This will
    control the inflammatory response. Before we go into the
    do's and do not's, could you explain your symptoms? Which
    tendon are we talking about? How it happend? When it
    happend? Most stretches should be held for more than 2
    seconds.. You mentioned Carpal Tunel,... Do you have any
    numbness and if so where?

    There is also a technique called P.N.F., that will help.

    Looking forward to helping with your recovery.

    G.L. D

    "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > D, The therapist who gave me the stretches specifically
    > instructed me NOT to ice the area. He also said that these
    > stretches treat carpal tunnel syndrome. There are two
    > stretches, each bend the wrist in opposing directions with
    > the elbow straightened. Each stretch is held for 2 seconds
    > or less, while applying friction with knuckles or thumb
    > from the other
    hand.
    > Thanks for the info. TG "douglas"
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > T; The techniques do have a name "Myofascial or Active
    > > Release". After you stretch the tendon do you ice the
    > > area? Is the compensating musculature being treated as
    > > well? And if so, How? Yes : In Ontario we are taught to
    > > be able to treat tendonitis very effectively. There is a
    > > treatment ( depending on which tendon ) called Friction
    > > Therapy. GL; D
    > >
    > >
    > > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > Is anyone familiar with the Muscle Release Technique?
    > > > I am treating my tendonitis with the stretches from
    > > > this technique, and it would boost
    my
    > > > confidence if I could find other people who
    > > > successfully used this treatment.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks.
    > > >
    > > > TG
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  4. Terry Galan

    Terry Galan Guest

    D

    It's a very long story. I've had "tennis elbow" for many
    years. It started with racquet sports, but almost any
    activity with repetitive motion aggravates the elbow.
    Treatment from chiropractors, massage therapists, physical
    therapists, and orthopedic surgeons didn't help. Most were
    happy to keep treating me even though there wasn't any
    improvement, a few were honest enough to tell me they did
    all they could. I've also had three cortisone shots. The
    first shot worked for a month, the other two were
    ineffective.

    A couple of months ago, I read an article about a physical
    therapist who had a similar experience to mine. He developed
    tendonitis from the deep tissue massage he did for his
    clients. After many ineffective treatments of various kinds,
    he eventually found relief from some stretches originating
    from Europe. These stretches are similar to the Active
    Isolated Stretches published by both Mattes and Wharton.
    This therapist has branded his version of these stretches
    with the trademark Muscle Release Technique. He offers
    workshops around the US to certify other therapists in MRT.
    For the average person, he also sells a self treatment video
    specifically for treating carpal tunnel and tendonitis.
    After exchanging some emails with the guy, I purchased the
    video and started the treatment. I like this treatment
    because it is something that I can easily do myself and the
    theory behind it seems to be common sense.

    I've noticed some improvement with my tendonitis, and it
    will probably be a few more months before I am totally
    symptom free. I don't understand why the many experts who
    previously treated me didn't prescribe this self-treatment,
    so I am still wondering if there is a "catch" somewhere. If
    there is no catch, then I will help spread the word about
    MRT, so that people will be aware of an option that doesn't
    involve surgery or dozens of visits to a specialist.

    The techniques that you mentioned, Myofascial or Active
    Release, Friction Therapy, and P.N.F, appear to be
    techniques that a certified massage therapist would use. The
    massage therapist who treated me specialized in sports
    injuries. I don't know if he used any of these techniques
    for me, but after many sessions, he advised me to get an
    XRAY and see a traditional doctor. I guess at this point I
    should stick with MRT for several more months to see if it
    really is the wonder technique.

    I appreciate your interest and advice. This MRT treatment
    must seem strange to you. It sounds like the Atkins diet of
    muscle therapy.

    TG "douglas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > T;
    >
    > After any/ALL Friction Therapy you must ice. This will
    > control the inflammatory response. Before we go into the
    > do's and do not's, could you explain your symptoms? Which
    > tendon are we talking about? How it happend? When it
    > happend? Most stretches should be held for more than 2
    > seconds.. You mentioned Carpal Tunel,... Do you have any
    > numbness and if so where?
    >
    > There is also a technique called P.N.F., that will help.
    >
    > Looking forward to helping with your recovery.
    >
    > G.L. D
    >
    > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > D, The therapist who gave me the stretches specifically
    > > instructed me NOT
    to
    > > ice the area. He also said that these stretches treat
    > > carpal tunnel syndrome. There are two stretches, each
    > > bend the wrist in opposing directions with the elbow
    > > straightened. Each stretch is held for 2
    seconds
    > > or less, while applying friction with knuckles or thumb
    > > from the other
    > hand.
    > > Thanks for the info. TG "douglas"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > T; The techniques do have a name "Myofascial or Active
    > > > Release". After you stretch the tendon do you ice the
    > > > area? Is the compensating musculature being treated as
    > > > well? And if so, How? Yes : In Ontario we are taught
    > > > to be able to treat tendonitis very effectively. There
    > > > is a treatment ( depending on which tendon ) called
    > > > Friction Therapy. GL; D
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > message
    > > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > Is anyone familiar with the Muscle Release
    > > > > Technique? I am treating
    my
    > > > > tendonitis with the stretches from this technique,
    > > > > and it would
    boost
    > my
    > > > > confidence if I could find other people who
    > > > > successfully used this treatment.
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanks.
    > > > >
    > > > > TG
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  5. Mj Hess

    Mj Hess Guest

    Hey Douglas. Just finishing up schooling here. One of the
    things we're being taught throughout our Clinicals, Sports,
    and Anatomy/Physiology classes is that a stretch beyond 2
    seconds starts what is known as a "stretch reflex"
    response. I can't possibly show you my textbooks here in
    the post so I went surfing the net for a few mins.. and
    came up with these..

    http://www.ultimatehandbook.com/Webpages/Health/stret-
    chiso.html

    ://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0812926234/ref=sib_rdr_srch/002-
    3534424-6532 805?v=search-
    inside&keywords=2+second+stretching

    though I must tell you that in my search for evidence to
    back up what my textbooks and instructors are saying.. I
    find a wide array of opinions on the subject and varieties
    of stretching and when and where (before, after and
    event/injury) etc.. this is all so very fascinating.. what
    are YOUR thoughts on the 2 second stretch and the muscle
    chemistry/contraction science that is going on beneath the
    surface? I'm here to learn!

    Mj

    "douglas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > T;
    <major snip here to cut down on redundant reading>
    > >> Most stretches should be held for more than 2 seconds..
    > You mentioned Carpal Tunel,... Do you have any numbness
    > and if so where?
    >
    > There is also a technique called P.N.F., that will help.
    >
    > Looking forward to helping with your recovery.
    >
    > G.L. D
    >
    > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > D, The therapist who gave me the stretches specifically
    > > instructed me NOT
    to
    > > ice the area. He also said that these stretches treat
    > > carpal tunnel syndrome. There are two stretches, each
    > > bend the wrist in opposing directions with the elbow
    > > straightened. Each stretch is held for 2
    seconds
    > > or less, while applying friction with knuckles or thumb
    > > from the other
    > hand.
    > > Thanks for the info. TG "douglas"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > T; The techniques do have a name "Myofascial or Active
    > > > Release". After you stretch the tendon do you ice the
    > > > area? Is the compensating musculature being treated as
    > > > well? And if so, How? Yes : In Ontario we are taught
    > > > to be able to treat tendonitis very effectively. There
    > > > is a treatment ( depending on which tendon ) called
    > > > Friction Therapy. GL; D
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > message
    > > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > Is anyone familiar with the Muscle Release
    > > > > Technique? I am treating
    my
    > > > > tendonitis with the stretches from this technique,
    > > > > and it would
    boost
    > my
    > > > > confidence if I could find other people who
    > > > > successfully used this treatment.
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanks.
    > > > >
    > > > > TG
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  6. Douglas

    Douglas Guest

    Most of the stretching has been taught incorrectly, I
    agree... When you stretch, you must go to the point where
    you feel it start to burn, and then back off to where it is
    comfortable, and then hold it. Exhaling from the time you
    felt it pull.

    Repeat this 3 times and you will increase the tendon length.

    Research P.N.F. ( Propriosceptive Neuromuscular
    Fascilitation), And work the synergistics..

    Another things you might want to check out, is a 'tech.'
    called 3S stretching.

    Just to point out an example;

    I can increase your lateral flexion (cervical) R.O.M., by
    resisting your contralateral flexion. With you as a client
    applying 10% of your strength repeated on 3 planes..

    You are all very educated here, I hope that my experience
    will serve...

    G.L. E-1..D;

    "Mj Hess" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hey Douglas. Just finishing up schooling here. One of the
    > things we're being taught throughout our Clinicals,
    > Sports, and Anatomy/Physiology classes is that a stretch
    > beyond 2 seconds starts what is known as a "stretch
    > reflex" response. I can't possibly show you my textbooks
    > here in the post so I went surfing the net for a few
    > mins.. and came up with
    these..
    >
    > http://www.ultimatehandbook.com/Webpages/Health/stretch-
    > iso.html
    >
    >
    ://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0812926234/ref=sib_rdr_srch/002-
    3534424-6532
    > 805?v=search-inside&keywords=2+second+stretching
    >
    > though I must tell you that in my search for evidence to
    > back up what my textbooks and instructors are saying.. I
    > find a wide array of opinions on the subject and varieties
    > of stretching and when and where (before, after and
    > event/injury) etc.. this is all so very fascinating.. what
    > are YOUR thoughts on the 2 second stretch and the muscle
    > chemistry/contraction science that is going on beneath the
    > surface? I'm here to learn!
    >
    > Mj
    >
    > "douglas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > T;
    > <major snip here to cut down on redundant reading>
    > > >> Most stretches should be held for more than 2
    > > >> seconds..
    > > You mentioned Carpal Tunel,... Do you have any numbness
    > > and if so where?
    > >
    > > There is also a technique called P.N.F., that will help.
    > >
    > > Looking forward to helping with your recovery.
    > >
    > > G.L. D
    > >
    > > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > D, The therapist who gave me the stretches
    > > > specifically instructed me NOT
    > to
    > > > ice the area. He also said that these stretches treat
    > > > carpal tunnel syndrome. There are two stretches, each
    > > > bend the wrist in opposing directions with the elbow
    > > > straightened. Each stretch is held for 2
    > seconds
    > > > or less, while applying friction with knuckles or
    > > > thumb from the other
    > > hand.
    > > > Thanks for the info. TG "douglas"
    > > > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > > T; The techniques do have a name "Myofascial or
    > > > > Active Release". After you stretch the tendon do you
    > > > > ice the area? Is the compensating musculature being
    > > > > treated as well? And if so, How? Yes : In Ontario we
    > > > > are taught to be able to treat tendonitis very
    > > > > effectively. There is a treatment ( depending on
    > > > > which tendon )
    called
    > > > > Friction Therapy. GL; D
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > > message
    > > > > news:<[email protected]roc.rr.com>...
    > > > > > Is anyone familiar with the Muscle Release
    > > > > > Technique? I am
    treating
    > my
    > > > > > tendonitis with the stretches from this technique,
    > > > > > and it would
    > boost
    > > my
    > > > > > confidence if I could find other people who
    > > > > > successfully used this treatment.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Thanks.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > TG
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  7. Terry Galan

    Terry Galan Guest

    Mj

    I believe that it is called the Myotatic Reflex. I
    haven't seen any clinical evidence that this reflex kicks
    in after 2 to 3 seconds, but avoiding this reflex is what
    Active Isolated Stretching and Muscle Release Technique
    is all about.

    Here is a link to an article discussing Muscle Release
    Technique.

    http://www.mrtherapy.com/articles/article1.html

    I am interested in the professional therapists' view of this
    technique. I agree that the theory behind this technique
    goes against traditional beliefs.

    TG "Mj Hess" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hey Douglas. Just finishing up schooling here. One of the
    > things we're being taught throughout our Clinicals,
    > Sports, and Anatomy/Physiology classes is that a stretch
    > beyond 2 seconds starts what is known as a "stretch
    > reflex" response. I can't possibly show you my textbooks
    > here in the post so I went surfing the net for a few
    > mins.. and came up with
    these..
    >
    > http://www.ultimatehandbook.com/Webpages/Health/stretch-
    > iso.html
    >
    >
    ://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0812926234/ref=sib_rdr_srch/002-
    3534424-6532
    > 805?v=search-inside&keywords=2+second+stretching
    >
    > though I must tell you that in my search for evidence to
    > back up what my textbooks and instructors are saying.. I
    > find a wide array of opinions on the subject and varieties
    > of stretching and when and where (before, after and
    > event/injury) etc.. this is all so very fascinating.. what
    > are YOUR thoughts on the 2 second stretch and the muscle
    > chemistry/contraction science that is going on beneath the
    > surface? I'm here to learn!
    >
    > Mj
    >
    > "douglas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > T;
    > <major snip here to cut down on redundant reading>
    > > >> Most stretches should be held for more than 2
    > > >> seconds..
    > > You mentioned Carpal Tunel,... Do you have any numbness
    > > and if so where?
    > >
    > > There is also a technique called P.N.F., that will help.
    > >
    > > Looking forward to helping with your recovery.
    > >
    > > G.L. D
    > >
    > > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > D, The therapist who gave me the stretches
    > > > specifically instructed me NOT
    > to
    > > > ice the area. He also said that these stretches treat
    > > > carpal tunnel syndrome. There are two stretches, each
    > > > bend the wrist in opposing directions with the elbow
    > > > straightened. Each stretch is held for 2
    > seconds
    > > > or less, while applying friction with knuckles or
    > > > thumb from the other
    > > hand.
    > > > Thanks for the info. TG "douglas"
    > > > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > > T; The techniques do have a name "Myofascial or
    > > > > Active Release". After you stretch the tendon do you
    > > > > ice the area? Is the compensating musculature being
    > > > > treated as well? And if so, How? Yes : In Ontario we
    > > > > are taught to be able to treat tendonitis very
    > > > > effectively. There is a treatment ( depending on
    > > > > which tendon )
    called
    > > > > Friction Therapy. GL; D
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > > message
    > > > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > > Is anyone familiar with the Muscle Release
    > > > > > Technique? I am
    treating
    > my
    > > > > > tendonitis with the stretches from this technique,
    > > > > > and it would
    > boost
    > > my
    > > > > > confidence if I could find other people who
    > > > > > successfully used this treatment.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Thanks.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > TG
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
  8. Mj Hess

    Mj Hess Guest

    Thank you both (Douglas and Terry) for your feedback. I'll check this all
    out and learn even more! :)

    Mj

    "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Mj
    >
    > I believe that it is called the Myotatic Reflex. I haven't
    > seen any
    clinical
    > evidence that this reflex kicks in after 2 to 3 seconds,
    > but avoiding this reflex is what Active Isolated
    > Stretching and Muscle Release Technique is all about.
    >
    > Here is a link to an article discussing Muscle Release
    > Technique.
    >
    > http://www.mrtherapy.com/articles/article1.html
    >
    > I am interested in the professional therapists' view of
    > this technique. I agree that the theory behind this
    > technique goes against traditional beliefs.
    >
    > TG "Mj Hess" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Hey Douglas. Just finishing up schooling here. One of
    > > the things we're being taught throughout our Clinicals,
    > > Sports, and Anatomy/Physiology classes is that a
    > > stretch beyond 2 seconds starts what is known as a
    > > "stretch reflex" response. I can't possibly show you my
    > > textbooks here
    in
    > > the post so I went surfing the net for a few mins.. and
    > > came up with
    > these..
    > >
    > > http://www.ultimatehandbook.com/Webpages/Health/stretch-
    > > iso.html
    > >
    > >
    >
    ://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0812926234/ref=sib_rdr_srch/002-
    3534424-6532
    > > 805?v=search-inside&keywords=2+second+stretching
    > >
    > > though I must tell you that in my search for evidence to
    > > back up what my textbooks and instructors are saying.. I
    > > find a wide array of opinions
    on
    > > the subject and varieties of stretching and when and
    > > where (before,
    after
    > > and event/injury) etc.. this is all so very
    > > fascinating.. what are YOUR thoughts on the 2 second
    > > stretch and the muscle chemistry/contraction science
    > > that is going on beneath the surface? I'm here to learn!
    > >
    > > Mj
    > >
    > > "douglas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > T;
    > > <major snip here to cut down on redundant reading>
    > > > >> Most stretches should be held for more than 2
    > > > >> seconds..
    > > > You mentioned Carpal Tunel,... Do you have any
    > > > numbness and if so
    where?
    > > >
    > > > There is also a technique called P.N.F., that will
    > > > help.
    > > >
    > > > Looking forward to helping with your recovery.
    > > >
    > > > G.L. D
    > > >
    > > > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > D, The therapist who gave me the stretches
    > > > > specifically instructed me
    NOT
    > > to
    > > > > ice the area. He also said that these stretches
    > > > > treat carpal tunnel syndrome. There are two
    > > > > stretches, each bend the wrist in opposing
    > > > > directions with the elbow straightened. Each stretch
    > > > > is held for 2
    > > seconds
    > > > > or less, while applying friction with knuckles or
    > > > > thumb from the
    other
    > > > hand.
    > > > > Thanks for the info. TG "douglas"
    > > > > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > >
    > > > > > T; The techniques do have a name "Myofascial or
    > > > > > Active Release". After you stretch the tendon do
    > > > > > you ice the area? Is the compensating musculature
    > > > > > being treated as well? And if so, How? Yes : In
    > > > > > Ontario we are taught to be able to treat
    > > > > > tendonitis very effectively. There is a treatment
    > > > > > ( depending on which tendon )
    > called
    > > > > > Friction Therapy. GL; D
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > > > "Terry Galan" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > > > message
    > > > > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > > > Is anyone familiar with the Muscle Release
    > > > > > > Technique? I am
    > treating
    > > my
    > > > > > > tendonitis with the stretches from this
    > > > > > > technique, and it would
    > > boost
    > > > my
    > > > > > > confidence if I could find other people who
    > > > > > > successfully used
    this
    > > > > > > treatment.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Thanks.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > TG
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
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