Testing an old engine

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ivar Hesselager, Dec 26, 2004.

  1. Anyone out here with a good knowledge of the bicycle engine, who can tell
    me, if it is safe to test an old mashine by overloading it to the extreme?

    I have traditionally found my maxiumum heart rate by going as fast as I
    could up a long steep hill and then doing a sprint at the top.

    To be frank, I'm getting a little older and more careful every year and I'm
    beginning to speculate, if this extreme overloading might one day be just
    one sprint too much for an old man, and thus be the end of my race.

    Last time I did the extreme overload test, was a year and a half ago, and I
    reached a heart rate of 192 - which is statistically high (not good nor bad,
    just high) for a man of 56 summers. I use the figure to calculate my
    training zones to feed my HR-monitor.

    But max heart rates are supposed to be dropping with age, and I am curious
    of what my max HR will be this year.

    Today I finished my two hour ride on the the icy roads with a hill sprint,
    and the HR went up to 185. This was close to max, I could feel. But actually
    I was afraid to go further.

    Is this a wise precaution or an unnecesary anxiety to refarin from the
    ultimate overloading at age 56?
    Is there a more gentle method to establish your personal HR training zones?


    Kindly
    Ivar of Denmark
     
    Tags:


  2. Dave Croft

    Dave Croft Guest

    "Ivar Hesselager" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Anyone out here with a good knowledge of the bicycle engine, who can tell
    > me, if it is safe to test an old mashine by overloading it to the extreme?
    >
    > I have traditionally found my maxiumum heart rate by going as fast as I
    > could up a long steep hill and then doing a sprint at the top.
    >
    > To be frank, I'm getting a little older and more careful every year and I'm
    > beginning to speculate, if this extreme overloading might one day be just
    > one sprint too much for an old man, and thus be the end of my race.
    >
    > Last time I did the extreme overload test, was a year and a half ago, and I
    > reached a heart rate of 192 - which is statistically high (not good nor bad,
    > just high) for a man of 56 summers. I use the figure to calculate my
    > training zones to feed my HR-monitor.
    >
    > But max heart rates are supposed to be dropping with age, and I am curious
    > of what my max HR will be this year.
    >
    > Today I finished my two hour ride on the the icy roads with a hill sprint,
    > and the HR went up to 185. This was close to max, I could feel. But actually
    > I was afraid to go further.
    >
    > Is this a wise precaution or an unnecesary anxiety to refarin from the
    > ultimate overloading at age 56?
    > Is there a more gentle method to establish your personal HR training zones?
    > Kindly
    > Ivar of Denmark


    Hi Ivar, When I toured Jutland 20 years ago, (well into my 40's)
    I had a problem finding any hills.
    Himmelbjerget was probably the nearest to a hill I could find.
    My pulse rate increases were raised much more by headwinds.
    I got to hate the view of the back of windturbines!
    --
    Dave Croft
    Warrington
    England
     
  3. Jim Smith

    Jim Smith Guest

    "Ivar Hesselager" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Anyone out here with a good knowledge of the bicycle engine, who can tell
    > me, if it is safe to test an old mashine by overloading it to the extreme?
    >
    > I have traditionally found my maxiumum heart rate by going as fast as I
    > could up a long steep hill and then doing a sprint at the top.
    >
    > To be frank, I'm getting a little older and more careful every year and I'm
    > beginning to speculate, if this extreme overloading might one day be just
    > one sprint too much for an old man, and thus be the end of my race.
    >
    > Last time I did the extreme overload test, was a year and a half ago, and I
    > reached a heart rate of 192 - which is statistically high (not good nor bad,
    > just high) for a man of 56 summers. I use the figure to calculate my
    > training zones to feed my HR-monitor.
    >
    > But max heart rates are supposed to be dropping with age, and I am curious
    > of what my max HR will be this year.
    >
    > Today I finished my two hour ride on the the icy roads with a hill sprint,
    > and the HR went up to 185. This was close to max, I could feel. But actually
    > I was afraid to go further.
    >
    > Is this a wise precaution or an unnecesary anxiety to refarin from the
    > ultimate overloading at age 56?
    > Is there a more gentle method to establish your personal HR training zones?


    Really this is a question for Bill Sornson, as this is one of his
    areas of expertise.

    The consensus these days seems to be that if you are already
    reasonably fit, do not have any chest pain with exercise, do not get
    out of breath easily, or have any know heart or other health problems
    then you should be OK. You should definitely stop if you feel faint,
    or dizzy, or anything like that.

    What do you imagine might happen to you?
     
  4. AB/9000

    AB/9000 Guest

    Ivar Hesselager wrote:

    > I have traditionally found my maxiumum heart rate by going as fast as I
    > could up a long steep hill and then doing a sprint at the top.


    In my experience maximum heartrate can only be reached after a long and
    thorough warm-up including min. 2-3 uphill sprints or hard intervals.
    Velrestitueret og med friske ben, naturligvis, og med den nødvendige
    motivation.
    Jo tættere du er på max, jo mere uregelmæssig bliver hjerterytmen og jo
    mindre pålidelig bliver udlæsningen i pulsmetret. Derfor skal du være
    forsigtig med at fastsætte din makspuls ud fra et enkelt forsøg, men
    måske tage gennemsnittet af et antal forsøg over en længere periode (max
    2 forsøg pr. uge)

    > Is there a more gentle method to establish your personal HR training zones?


    Not to my knowledge. Only the 208 - (0,7 x age) formula, which will give
    you the average max HR for a person your age. However, I can only assume
    that your max HR will decrease with age corresponding to this formula
    (0,7 bpm per year).

    Godt nytår!
    AndersB
     
  5. Ivar Hesselager wrote:

    > Anyone out here with a good knowledge of the bicycle engine, who can tell
    > me, if it is safe to test an old mashine by overloading it to the extreme?
    >
    > I have traditionally found my maxiumum heart rate by going as fast as I
    > could up a long steep hill and then doing a sprint at the top.
    >
    > To be frank, I'm getting a little older and more careful every year and I'm
    > beginning to speculate, if this extreme overloading might one day be just
    > one sprint too much for an old man, and thus be the end of my race.
    >
    > Last time I did the extreme overload test, was a year and a half ago, and I
    > reached a heart rate of 192 - which is statistically high (not good nor bad,
    > just high) for a man of 56 summers. I use the figure to calculate my
    > training zones to feed my HR-monitor.
    >
    > But max heart rates are supposed to be dropping with age, and I am curious
    > of what my max HR will be this year.
    >
    > Today I finished my two hour ride on the the icy roads with a hill sprint,
    > and the HR went up to 185. This was close to max, I could feel. But actually
    > I was afraid to go further.
    >
    > Is this a wise precaution or an unnecesary anxiety to refarin from the
    > ultimate overloading at age 56?
    > Is there a more gentle method to establish your personal HR training zones?


    If you've been riding regularly I don't see the problem. You probably
    get close to your MHR on hills anyway. If you are coming back after a
    long layoff then you should probably see your doctor (physician) first.
     
  6. TomP

    TomP Guest

    Can't you get a stress test from your Doctor?

    Ivar Hesselager wrote:

    > Anyone out here with a good knowledge of the bicycle engine, who can tell
    > me, if it is safe to test an old mashine by overloading it to the extreme?
    >
    > I have traditionally found my maxiumum heart rate by going as fast as I
    > could up a long steep hill and then doing a sprint at the top.
    >
    > To be frank, I'm getting a little older and more careful every year and I'm
    > beginning to speculate, if this extreme overloading might one day be just
    > one sprint too much for an old man, and thus be the end of my race.
    >
    > Last time I did the extreme overload test, was a year and a half ago, and I
    > reached a heart rate of 192 - which is statistically high (not good nor bad,
    > just high) for a man of 56 summers. I use the figure to calculate my
    > training zones to feed my HR-monitor.
    >
    > But max heart rates are supposed to be dropping with age, and I am curious
    > of what my max HR will be this year.
    >
    > Today I finished my two hour ride on the the icy roads with a hill sprint,
    > and the HR went up to 185. This was close to max, I could feel. But actually
    > I was afraid to go further.
    >
    > Is this a wise precaution or an unnecesary anxiety to refarin from the
    > ultimate overloading at age 56?
    > Is there a more gentle method to establish your personal HR training zones?
    >
    > Kindly
    > Ivar of Denmark


    --
    Tp,

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    --- ( )/ ( ) ---- -\<.
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    -----------------------------------------

    No Lawsuit Ever Fixed A Moron...
     
  7. On Mon, 27 Dec 2004 15:29:18 GMT, TomP <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Can't you get a stress test from your Doctor?

    My doctor won't give me one.. he says I'm getting one every time I
    ride anyway <G>

    >Ivar Hesselager wrote:
    >
    >> Anyone out here with a good knowledge of the bicycle engine, who can tell
    >> me, if it is safe to test an old mashine by overloading it to the extreme?


    I can only speak for myself .. I see my doctor on a regular basis and
    he says I'm fine. My max is 171 and I hit 165 quite often in a race
    and "maxing out" is part of my training regimen.
    I'll be 68 in January

    charlieb in ct.
     
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