That's torn it! -- Torn lettuce?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Phred, Sep 20, 2005.

  1. Phred

    Phred Guest

    G'day mates,

    My "traditional" salad (i.e. the only one I ever make for myself)
    consists of chopped lettuce (strips about... lemme see, better
    translate... 3/8" to 1/2" wide by 1/2" to 1" long, cut with a knife)
    and the other usual ingredients for a tossed salad (chopped tomato and
    onion, grated carrot, diced spuds, sometimes chopped hard boiled eggs,
    and so on). So when someone says to use "torn lettuce" I'm left
    wondering how much it should be torn.

    The question arose with that recent recipe for New Orleans Grapefruit
    Salad posted by Victor a couple of weeks back. It says to use "1 head
    iceberg lettuce, washed, trimmed, and torn". (The fragments are then
    used as a bed for the grapefruit segments on individual serving
    plates.)

    I realise it probably doesn't matter a tinker's damn how much it's
    torn within wide limits; but, just in case there *is* something of an
    expectation among diners of a "torn lettuce" standard, I thought I'd
    better ask here. (And I checked the FAQ, Vic, but it has neither
    "torn" nor "lettuce" on the page. ;-)

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID
     
    Tags:


  2. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-09-21, Phred <[email protected]> wrote:
    > torn within wide limits; but, just in case there *is* something of an
    > expectation among diners of a "torn lettuce" standard, I thought I'd
    > better ask here.


    Only an expectation among those whose sphincter is clenched clear up
    to their eyebrows or have so much money and are so bored with life
    they make it a point to concern themselves about that sort of thing.

    nb
     
  3. Wayne Boatwright wrote on 20 Sep 2005 in rec.food.cooking

    > Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    > wilting. When I tear head lettuce I tend to break it into chunks,
    > perhaps 1 x 1-/12 inches. I tear leaf lettuces in somewhat larger
    > pieces. IMHO, pieces as small as you cut are too small and would be
    > especially small if torn rather than cut. Many people find torn
    > lettuce more esthetically pleasing.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    > ____________________________________________
    >
    > Not all people are annoying. Some are dead.
    >
    >


    I remember Vincent Price making a Salad on Carson's The Tonight Show...I
    think I remember him saying torn lettuce bleeds/bruises less.

    --
    The eyes are the mirrors....
    But the ears...Ah the ears.
    The ears keep the hat up.
     
  4. On Tue 20 Sep 2005 07:44:26p, Phred wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > G'day mates,
    >
    > My "traditional" salad (i.e. the only one I ever make for myself)
    > consists of chopped lettuce (strips about... lemme see, better
    > translate... 3/8" to 1/2" wide by 1/2" to 1" long, cut with a knife)
    > and the other usual ingredients for a tossed salad (chopped tomato and
    > onion, grated carrot, diced spuds, sometimes chopped hard boiled eggs,
    > and so on). So when someone says to use "torn lettuce" I'm left
    > wondering how much it should be torn.
    >
    > The question arose with that recent recipe for New Orleans Grapefruit
    > Salad posted by Victor a couple of weeks back. It says to use "1 head
    > iceberg lettuce, washed, trimmed, and torn". (The fragments are then
    > used as a bed for the grapefruit segments on individual serving
    > plates.)
    >
    > I realise it probably doesn't matter a tinker's damn how much it's
    > torn within wide limits; but, just in case there *is* something of an
    > expectation among diners of a "torn lettuce" standard, I thought I'd
    > better ask here. (And I checked the FAQ, Vic, but it has neither
    > "torn" nor "lettuce" on the page. ;-)
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >


    Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    wilting. When I tear head lettuce I tend to break it into chunks, perhaps
    1 x 1-/12 inches. I tear leaf lettuces in somewhat larger pieces. IMHO,
    pieces as small as you cut are too small and would be especially small if
    torn rather than cut. Many people find torn lettuce more esthetically
    pleasing.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Not all people are annoying. Some are dead.
     
  5. sf

    sf Guest

    On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 02:44:26 GMT, Phred wrote:

    > G'day mates,
    >
    > My "traditional" salad (i.e. the only one I ever make for myself)
    > consists of chopped lettuce (strips about... lemme see, better
    > translate... 3/8" to 1/2" wide by 1/2" to 1" long, cut with a knife)
    > and the other usual ingredients for a tossed salad (chopped tomato and
    > onion, grated carrot, diced spuds, sometimes chopped hard boiled eggs,
    > and so on). So when someone says to use "torn lettuce" I'm left
    > wondering how much it should be torn.


    I tear Bibb/Butter lettuce, but I chop Romaine.
    >
    > The question arose with that recent recipe for New Orleans Grapefruit
    > Salad posted by Victor a couple of weeks back. It says to use "1 head
    > iceberg lettuce, washed, trimmed, and torn". (The fragments are then
    > used as a bed for the grapefruit segments on individual serving
    > plates.)
    >

    Good grief.... chop head lettuce! Why pretend it's la-tee-dah stuff?

    > I realise it probably doesn't matter a tinker's damn how much it's
    > torn within wide limits; but, just in case there *is* something of an
    > expectation among diners of a "torn lettuce" standard,


    I can't understand the mind set that allows people to eat head lettuce
    and requires it to be torn. Head lettuce is flavored cardboard, so
    cut it.

    > I thought I'd
    > better ask here. (And I checked the FAQ, Vic, but it has neither
    > "torn" nor "lettuce" on the page. ;-)
    >

    It's a subject that is interesting only to you and me. LOL! To be
    perfectly honest, I gauge the culinary state of affairs in areas I
    visit by their salad. They can fool you with the main dish, if you
    picked it well.... but house salads are supposed to appeal to the
    masses. If the salad is composed with head lettuce, I pass judgment
    and it's not a good one.
     
  6. On Tue 20 Sep 2005 08:59:35p, Mr Libido Incognito wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote on 20 Sep 2005 in rec.food.cooking
    >
    >> Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    >> wilting. When I tear head lettuce I tend to break it into chunks,
    >> perhaps 1 x 1-/12 inches. I tear leaf lettuces in somewhat larger
    >> pieces. IMHO, pieces as small as you cut are too small and would be
    >> especially small if torn rather than cut. Many people find torn
    >> lettuce more esthetically pleasing.


    > I remember Vincent Price making a Salad on Carson's The Tonight Show...I
    > think I remember him saying torn lettuce bleeds/bruises less.
    >


    I used to have Mary and Vincent Price's Come into the Kitchen Cook Book (lost
    in a fire). I enjoyed some of those recipes.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Not all people are annoying. Some are dead.
     
  7. Speaking of Vincent Price - enjoy this spoken word excerpt entitled
    "How To Cook Small Boys"

    http://www.aprilwinchell.com/multimedia/

    scroll down to the "Too Weird To Classify" section near the bottom.
    There's a ton of other frighteningly bad stuff here too.
     
  8. On Tue 20 Sep 2005 09:11:45p, sf wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 02:44:26 GMT, Phred wrote:
    >
    >> G'day mates,
    >>
    >> My "traditional" salad (i.e. the only one I ever make for myself)
    >> consists of chopped lettuce (strips about... lemme see, better
    >> translate... 3/8" to 1/2" wide by 1/2" to 1" long, cut with a knife)
    >> and the other usual ingredients for a tossed salad (chopped tomato and
    >> onion, grated carrot, diced spuds, sometimes chopped hard boiled eggs,
    >> and so on). So when someone says to use "torn lettuce" I'm left
    >> wondering how much it should be torn.

    >
    > I tear Bibb/Butter lettuce, but I chop Romaine.
    >>
    >> The question arose with that recent recipe for New Orleans Grapefruit
    >> Salad posted by Victor a couple of weeks back. It says to use "1 head
    >> iceberg lettuce, washed, trimmed, and torn". (The fragments are then
    >> used as a bed for the grapefruit segments on individual serving
    >> plates.)
    >>

    > Good grief.... chop head lettuce! Why pretend it's la-tee-dah stuff?


    I really prefer it torn into chunks. I just don't like the way it looks
    when it's cut. Only exception is when I make a "chopped salad" where all
    the ingredients are cut in smallish chunks.

    >> I realise it probably doesn't matter a tinker's damn how much it's
    >> torn within wide limits; but, just in case there *is* something of an
    >> expectation among diners of a "torn lettuce" standard,

    >
    > I can't understand the mind set that allows people to eat head lettuce
    > and requires it to be torn. Head lettuce is flavored cardboard, so
    > cut it.


    True, head lettuce is rather tasteless, but it's a good foil for a very
    good dressing.


    >> I thought I'd
    >> better ask here. (And I checked the FAQ, Vic, but it has neither
    >> "torn" nor "lettuce" on the page. ;-)
    >>

    > It's a subject that is interesting only to you and me. LOL! To be
    > perfectly honest, I gauge the culinary state of affairs in areas I
    > visit by their salad. They can fool you with the main dish, if you
    > picked it well.... but house salads are supposed to appeal to the
    > masses. If the salad is composed with head lettuce, I pass judgment
    > and it's not a good one.


    I don't mind a small amount of head lettuce added to a salad of mixed
    greens, as it does provide a bit of crispness that most lettuce don't have.
    OTOH, if the salad is predominantly head lettuce I don't much care for it.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Not all people are annoying. Some are dead.
     
  9. On Tue 20 Sep 2005 09:16:07p, morgul the friendly drelb wrote in
    rec.food.cooking:

    > Speaking of Vincent Price - enjoy this spoken word excerpt entitled
    > "How To Cook Small Boys"
    >
    > http://www.aprilwinchell.com/multimedia/
    >
    > scroll down to the "Too Weird To Classify" section near the bottom.
    > There's a ton of other frighteningly bad stuff here too.
    >
    >


    Great page! Thanks!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Not all people are annoying. Some are dead.
     
  10. notbob

    notbob Guest

    On 2005-09-21, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    > wilting.


    Horse pucky! While "tearing" gives illusion the salad is the latest
    trendy organic/free range/whatever greens, the fact is most salads are
    crisped in ice water and dried just prior to serving. Any salad green
    can be cut, shot, or mandolined and preserved for 2-3 days in ice
    water with little or no degradation and most wouldn't have a clue.
    This is common practice.

    nb
     
  11. On Tue 20 Sep 2005 10:23:44p, notbob wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On 2005-09-21, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    >> wilting.

    >
    > Horse pucky! While "tearing" gives illusion the salad is the latest
    > trendy organic/free range/whatever greens, the fact is most salads are
    > crisped in ice water and dried just prior to serving. Any salad green
    > can be cut, shot, or mandolined and preserved for 2-3 days in ice
    > water with little or no degradation and most wouldn't have a clue.
    > This is common practice.
    >
    > nb
    >


    I said "supposedly"! :)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    ____________________________________________

    Not all people are annoying. Some are dead.
     
  12. aem

    aem Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    > Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    > wilting.


    More than 'supposedly' and easily shown by experimentation. Take two
    pieces of lettuce, cut one in half, tear the other in half. Put them
    down on your cutting board and go away. Come back in half an hour and
    look closely at the edges of each piece. The torn edges will be less
    wilted and less discolored than the cut edges.

    Whether the difference matters is up to you.

    > [snip] Many people find torn lettuce more esthetically pleasing.


    I do, but again, it's a personal thing. -aem
     
  13. Wayne replied to sf:

    >> I can't understand the mind set that allows people to eat head lettuce
    >> and requires it to be torn. Head lettuce is flavored cardboard, so
    >> cut it.

    >
    > True, head lettuce is rather tasteless, but it's a good foil for a very
    > good dressing.


    Iceberg lettuce is low in calories and high in potassium. It's also got a
    pleasant texture and a delicate sweetness and fragrance which are often
    overlooked by LETTUCE SNOBS LIKE YOU! :)

    To answer Phred's original post, I concur with Wayne's practice of tearing
    lettuce (of all varieties) unless I'm making a chopped salad.

    Most replies have ignored what I thought was the point of Phred's post: If
    you tear the lettuce, how large are the torn pieces? My answer is that I
    tear the lettuce into pieces which I think can be easily eaten with a salad
    fork. That works out to no dimension being larger than about two-and-a-half
    inches or smaller than one inch. But that's just me.

    Bob
     
  14. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > Most replies have ignored what I thought was the point of Phred's post: If
    > you tear the lettuce, how large are the torn pieces? My answer is that I
    > tear the lettuce into pieces which I think can be easily eaten with a salad
    > fork. That works out to no dimension being larger than about two-and-a-half
    > inches or smaller than one inch. But that's just me.
    >
    > Bob


    I'm with ya on the no smaller than 1 inch size. I HATE it when people
    chop their food into miniscule pieces. My MIL does this with
    everything, my sister and nieceas do it with fruit salad and potato
    salad. Ick! Give me big pieces! If I want them smaller, I will cut
    them myself!

    -L.
     
  15. cathyxyz

    cathyxyz Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Tue 20 Sep 2005 07:44:26p, Phred wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >
    >>G'day mates,
    >>
    >>My "traditional" salad (i.e. the only one I ever make for myself)
    >>consists of chopped lettuce (strips about... lemme see, better
    >>translate... 3/8" to 1/2" wide by 1/2" to 1" long, cut with a knife)
    >>and the other usual ingredients for a tossed salad (chopped tomato and
    >>onion, grated carrot, diced spuds, sometimes chopped hard boiled eggs,
    >>and so on). So when someone says to use "torn lettuce" I'm left
    >>wondering how much it should be torn.
    >>
    >>The question arose with that recent recipe for New Orleans Grapefruit
    >>Salad posted by Victor a couple of weeks back. It says to use "1 head
    >>iceberg lettuce, washed, trimmed, and torn". (The fragments are then
    >>used as a bed for the grapefruit segments on individual serving
    >>plates.)
    >>
    >>I realise it probably doesn't matter a tinker's damn how much it's
    >>torn within wide limits; but, just in case there *is* something of an
    >>expectation among diners of a "torn lettuce" standard, I thought I'd
    >>better ask here. (And I checked the FAQ, Vic, but it has neither
    >>"torn" nor "lettuce" on the page. ;-)
    >>
    >>Cheers, Phred.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    > wilting. When I tear head lettuce I tend to break it into chunks, perhaps
    > 1 x 1-/12 inches. I tear leaf lettuces in somewhat larger pieces. IMHO,
    > pieces as small as you cut are too small and would be especially small if
    > torn rather than cut. Many people find torn lettuce more esthetically
    > pleasing.
    >


    Well, my ex-sister-in-law, who fancied herself as a great chef, used to
    take me to task every time I chopped lettuce. She was in the catering
    business and had been on several "gourmet" cooking courses. She said
    that it bruises the lettuce if you cut it with a knife, so I suppose
    that's true.....

    However, as to the getting it to the right size when tearing.... I tend
    to go for "bite-sized". I am sure that really helped :)

    Like your new sig, Wayne, BTW. heh heh

    --
    Cheers
    Cathy(xyz)
     
  16. Phred

    Phred Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Bob Terwilliger" <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >Wayne replied to sf:
    >>> I can't understand the mind set that allows people to eat head lettuce
    >>> and requires it to be torn. Head lettuce is flavored cardboard, so
    >>> cut it.

    >>
    >> True, head lettuce is rather tasteless, but it's a good foil for a very
    >> good dressing.

    >
    >Iceberg lettuce is low in calories and high in potassium. It's also got a
    >pleasant texture and a delicate sweetness and fragrance which are often
    >overlooked by LETTUCE SNOBS LIKE YOU! :)
    >
    >To answer Phred's original post, I concur with Wayne's practice of tearing
    >lettuce (of all varieties) unless I'm making a chopped salad.
    >
    >Most replies have ignored what I thought was the point of Phred's post: If
    >you tear the lettuce, how large are the torn pieces? My answer is that I
    >tear the lettuce into pieces which I think can be easily eaten with a salad
    >fork. That works out to no dimension being larger than about two-and-a-half
    >inches or smaller than one inch. But that's just me.


    Onya, Bob! I should have thought more about it myself -- clearly an
    American recipe would call for pieces small enough to eat with a fork
    without the aid of a knife, so that would set an upper limit. Around
    here, Iceberg is the only type commonly available, so I'm afraid I'll
    have to give the more exclusive salad clubs a miss. ;-)

    [Thanks too, to all you others who have expressed advice or opinions.]

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID
     
  17. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Tue 20 Sep 2005 07:44:26p, Phred wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> G'day mates,
    >>
    >> My "traditional" salad (i.e. the only one I ever make for myself)
    >> consists of chopped lettuce (strips about... lemme see, better
    >> translate... 3/8" to 1/2" wide by 1/2" to 1" long, cut with a knife)
    >> and the other usual ingredients for a tossed salad (chopped tomato
    >> and onion, grated carrot, diced spuds, sometimes chopped hard boiled
    >> eggs, and so on). So when someone says to use "torn lettuce" I'm
    >> left wondering how much it should be torn.
    >>
    >> The question arose with that recent recipe for New Orleans Grapefruit
    >> Salad posted by Victor a couple of weeks back. It says to use "1
    >> head iceberg lettuce, washed, trimmed, and torn". (The fragments are
    >> then used as a bed for the grapefruit segments on individual serving
    >> plates.)
    >>
    >> I realise it probably doesn't matter a tinker's damn how much it's
    >> torn within wide limits; but, just in case there *is* something of an
    >> expectation among diners of a "torn lettuce" standard, I thought I'd
    >> better ask here. (And I checked the FAQ, Vic, but it has neither
    >> "torn" nor "lettuce" on the page. ;-)
    >>
    >> Cheers, Phred.
    >>

    >
    > Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    > wilting. When I tear head lettuce I tend to break it into chunks,
    > perhaps 1 x 1-/12 inches. I tear leaf lettuces in somewhat larger
    > pieces. IMHO, pieces as small as you cut are too small and would be
    > especially small if torn rather than cut. Many people find torn
    > lettuce more esthetically pleasing.
    >


    I always tear lettuce for this reason Wayne. The size depends on the type
    of lettuce and the dressing I intend to use. I don't really care one way or
    another as long as the salad is edible ;)

    Michael

    --
    Send email to dog30 at charter dot net
     
  18. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Tue 20 Sep 2005 07:44:26p, Phred wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> G'day mates,
    >>
    >> My "traditional" salad (i.e. the only one I ever make for myself)
    >> consists of chopped lettuce (strips about... lemme see, better
    >> translate... 3/8" to 1/2" wide by 1/2" to 1" long, cut with a knife)
    >> and the other usual ingredients for a tossed salad (chopped tomato
    >> and onion, grated carrot, diced spuds, sometimes chopped hard boiled
    >> eggs, and so on). So when someone says to use "torn lettuce" I'm
    >> left wondering how much it should be torn.
    >>
    >> The question arose with that recent recipe for New Orleans Grapefruit
    >> Salad posted by Victor a couple of weeks back. It says to use "1
    >> head iceberg lettuce, washed, trimmed, and torn". (The fragments are
    >> then used as a bed for the grapefruit segments on individual serving
    >> plates.)
    >>
    >> I realise it probably doesn't matter a tinker's damn how much it's
    >> torn within wide limits; but, just in case there *is* something of an
    >> expectation among diners of a "torn lettuce" standard, I thought I'd
    >> better ask here. (And I checked the FAQ, Vic, but it has neither
    >> "torn" nor "lettuce" on the page. ;-)
    >>
    >> Cheers, Phred.
    >>

    >
    > Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    > wilting. When I tear head lettuce I tend to break it into chunks,
    > perhaps 1 x 1-/12 inches. I tear leaf lettuces in somewhat larger
    > pieces. IMHO, pieces as small as you cut are too small and would be
    > especially small if torn rather than cut. Many people find torn
    > lettuce more esthetically pleasing.
    >


    I always tear lettuce for this reason Wayne. The size depends on the type
    of lettuce and the dressing I intend to use. I don't really care one way or
    another as long as the salad is edible ;)

    Michael

    --
    Send email to dog30 at charter dot net
     
  19. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue 20 Sep 2005 10:23:44p, notbob wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > > On 2005-09-21, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    > >> wilting.

    > >
    > > Horse pucky! While "tearing" gives illusion the salad is the latest
    > > trendy organic/free range/whatever greens, the fact is most salads are
    > > crisped in ice water and dried just prior to serving. Any salad green
    > > can be cut, shot, or mandolined and preserved for 2-3 days in ice
    > > water with little or no degradation and most wouldn't have a clue.
    > > This is common practice.
    > >
    > > nb
    > >

    >
    > I said "supposedly"! :)


    Heheheheh, yup - ya gotta sneak as many qualifiers as possible in huh?
    ',;~}~



    Shaun aRe
     
  20. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue 20 Sep 2005 10:23:44p, notbob wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > > On 2005-09-21, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Supposedly, tearing lettuce reduces oxidation of the edges and retards
    > >> wilting.

    > >
    > > Horse pucky! While "tearing" gives illusion the salad is the latest
    > > trendy organic/free range/whatever greens, the fact is most salads are
    > > crisped in ice water and dried just prior to serving. Any salad green
    > > can be cut, shot, or mandolined and preserved for 2-3 days in ice
    > > water with little or no degradation and most wouldn't have a clue.
    > > This is common practice.
    > >
    > > nb
    > >

    >
    > I said "supposedly"! :)


    Heheheheh, yup - ya gotta sneak as many qualifiers as possible in huh?
    ',;~}~



    Shaun aRe
     
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