The "classic" crash procedure...

Discussion in 'Commuting and Road Safety' started by Volnix, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    OK so I am using this bike to get around town 2 years now. I never had any problems with balance but there is one thing that almost ALL the time is causing me to lose balance from the bike.

    I don't know why this happens (not really aware of the physics of it) but apparently every time the handlebar
    knocks on something the bike immediately tilts to the opposite side and I lose balance.

    Does anyone know why this happens? Is there something to do to avoid losing balance from this situation? (Except avoiding the handlebar crashing on things of course /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif).


    Many thanks /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
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  2. Conniebiker

    Conniebiker New Member

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    It has to do with the front wheel tracking into the object, taking the center of gravity to the opposite.
     
  3. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    +1. That's the bulk of it. When the wheel turns it moves the contact patch to one of the bike, resulting in the line between contact patches to be far (relatively) to one side of the bike. That leaves the bike's cg off to the opposite side of that line, an unstable position if the handlebar is moved too much or the bike is moving too slowly. Couple that with maybe not being confident on the bike and not responding quickly enough and you get a recipe for falling over. You'll notice that when moving at speed, it doesn't take much movement of the handlebars at all to turn, and as such in most riding conditions the cg remains centered--or very close to it--between the wheels. This makes sense as most of the time the bike is upright when riding. When turning, the cg again moves off to one side, but balance is maintained because the dynamics of a turn mostly counter the cg shift relative to the contact patches and the vertical plane. Much like when your handlebars bump something, if you lean too much at a given speed, bikey fall over. Unfortunately, physics doesn't have a complete picture of why bikes can be in a relative "equilibrium" (i.e. remain upright or remain balanced in a turn). A person's sense of balance is a factor.
     
  4. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    You're overthinking things. Just don't ride into stuff... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif
     
  5. bogieboy

    bogieboy New Member

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    If you loosen up your stem bolts several turns that may remedy the situation, making your handles break away from the impact instead of holding fast......... ;-)
     
  6. 64Paramount

    64Paramount Active Member

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    Or maybe an airbag that fires upon impact.. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
     
  7. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    What a brilliant idea!!! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
  8. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Try this little idea...

    Ride with your hands on the outside of the handlebars. If you ride a flat handlebar, leave your pinky exposed at the end. If you ride a drop handlebar ride with your hand on the brake hoods. Either way should you wallop something you'll hit it with your hands and very quickly you'll take notice of where you're going and the pain from ineptitude will get old real fast.

    Ride without a helmet too for added incentive. ;)
     
  9. pantianyingck

    pantianyingck New Member

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    aware of the physics of it) but apparently every time the handlebar
    knocks on something the bike immediately tilts to the opposite side and I lose balance.http://www.avufo.info/g.gif
     
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