the cycle politic?



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G.Daniels

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do arabs ride bicycles? where, how many in relation to singapore, are arabs interested in fuel
conservation? have arabs demonstrated a concern for maintaining ecological balance? do arabs ride in
the european cycling series? are there any arab bicycle production facilities-designers. convert
arab to muslim where necessary. are discussions of these questions limited to rock throwing? as
trujillo once said "hey dude,you peel it and the choices begin to narrow." daniels the
lebanese-tunisian.
 
K

Kbh

Guest
Arab countries have not produced societies economically successful enough to bicycle (or do much of
anything else) for pleasure. Nor have they produced much of value to the world. The combined
economic output of the 20-odd arab countries roughly equals that of Spain.

Do arab (or muslim persian) countries ride for practical purposes like, say, China? You certainly
don't see as much of it. That's a good question.

"g.daniels" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> do arabs ride bicycles? where, how many in relation to singapore, are arabs interested in fuel
> conservation? have arabs demonstrated a concern for maintaining ecological balance? do arabs ride
> in the european cycling series? are there any arab bicycle production facilities-designers.
> convert arab to muslim where necessary. are discussions of these questions limited to rock
> throwing? as trujillo once said "hey dude,you peel it and the choices begin to narrow." daniels
> the lebanese-tunisian.
 
M

Mark Janeba

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g.daniels wrote:
> do arabs ride bicycles? [...] do arabs ride in the european cycling series?

IIRC, there were entrants in the 1984 Olympic road race visibly from Saudi Arabia (I think they had
the words "Saudi Arabia" on their uniforms, but the memory fades. I was watching at the roadside).
also, again IIRC, they got dropped in relatively few laps.

Regards,
--
Mark Janeba remove antispam phrase in address to reply
 
R

Raptor

Guest
g.daniels wrote:
> do arabs ride bicycles?

Sand and heat, perhaps.

--
--
Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
 
M

Mark Hickey

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Raptor <[email protected]> wrote:

>g.daniels wrote:
>> do arabs ride bicycles?
>
>Sand and heat, perhaps.

Probably has more to do with the Arab drivers. According to expatriates I know who lived in Saudi,
the road is full of the largest possible SUVs being driven at suicidal speeds, with little or no
regard for any rule of traffic law (such as obeying traffic lights).

That would be enough to cut down MY mileage! ;-)

Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
 
G

Gary Young

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[email protected] (g.daniels) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> do arabs ride bicycles? where, how many in relation to singapore, are arabs interested in fuel
> conservation? have arabs demonstrated a concern for maintaining ecological balance? do arabs ride
> in the european cycling series? are there any arab bicycle production facilities-designers.
> convert arab to muslim where necessary. are discussions of these questions limited to rock
> throwing? as trujillo once said "hey dude,you peel it and the choices begin to narrow." daniels
> the lebanese-tunisian.

During the Afghanistan war I saw several photos of Afghanis on bicycles, as well as this story on a
bicycle race:

http://www.totalbike.com/news/article/567/

I think there was a profile in the New York Times of a boy who made his living as a bicycle
courier in Kabul.

If I remember correctly, the Taliban prohibited women from riding bicycles.
 
S

Spam Hater

Guest
Gary Young wrote:
>
> If I remember correctly, the Taliban prohibited women from riding bicycles.

Can someone tell me what the taliban DIDN'T prohibit? I am surprised breathing didn't fit in there
somewhere...

Joe
--

I don't herd cats anymore. All you end up with are scratches and a bunch of ****** off cats.
 
C

Claire Petersky

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[email protected] (g.daniels) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> do arabs ride bicycles?

The subject of the movie, "The Day I Became a Woman" is Irani, not Arab, but you might find it
interesting.

The middle portion of the film is about a young woman who is in a bicycle race. Dressed in heavy
black chadors, the racers pace along the coastal path competing with intensity. Then from out of the
dust, the young woman's husband appears on horseback demanding her to return home. When this fails,
he returns with his father and then numberous cousins and uncles all on on horseback, but still she
refuses to stop.

Maybe you could catch it on video?

Warm Regards,

Claire Petersky ([email protected]) Home of the meditative cyclist:
http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm Singing with you at: http://www.tiferet.net/ Books
just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at: http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
 
M

Matt O'Toole

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"spam hater" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

> Gary Young wrote:
> >
> > If I remember correctly, the Taliban prohibited women
from riding
> > bicycles.
>
> Can someone tell me what the taliban DIDN'T prohibit? I am
surprised
> breathing didn't fit in there somewhere...

It did, depending on the circumstances. They often put a stop to it.

Matt O.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
"Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> > do arabs ride bicycles?
>
> The subject of the movie, "The Day I Became a Woman" is Irani, not Arab, but you might find it
> interesting.
>
> The middle portion of the film is about a young woman who is in a bicycle race. Dressed in heavy
> black chadors, the racers pace along the coastal path competing with intensity. Then from out of
> the dust, the young woman's husband appears on horseback demanding her to return home. When this
> fails, he returns with his father and then numberous cousins and uncles all on on horseback, but
> still she refuses to stop.
>
> Maybe you could catch it on video?
>
I saw the end of that on SBS. It was very boring and unbelievable even though the social message may
have been important. Mark Lee
 
M

Mark Hickey

Guest
spam hater <[email protected]> wrote:

>Gary Young wrote:
>>
>> If I remember correctly, the Taliban prohibited women from riding bicycles.
>
>Can someone tell me what the taliban DIDN'T prohibit? I am surprised breathing didn't fit in there
>somewhere...

There were a lot of things you could do to cause them to invoke that particular prohibition
as well. :-(

Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
 
G

G.Daniels

Guest
[email protected] (g.daniels) wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> boring boring boring.
one of the messages missed and misunderstood "much to our chagrin"is that life in the desert does
tend to be boring boring boring

see that stuff about wandering in the wilderness, john the b., ect.

think wilderness wandering brain chemistry vs the big mac attack brain chemistry
 
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