The Fall Season

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by David Rogers, Sep 16, 2003.

  1. David Rogers

    David Rogers Guest

    It feels like Fall here in Louisiana. I took a walk this mooring, I went a full mile, and it was
    great. The birds were singing and I ended my walk reluctantly. I hope you are getting some Fall
    weather where you are.

    David
     
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  2. Cat

    Cat Guest

    Woo Hoo! Way to go, David. It's a great accomplishment to walk a mile. Think how many people you see
    every day who can't walk that far....not that it is a "competition" or anything, but just makes you
    realize how you're getting in better shape than you were.

    Cat

    "David Rogers" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > It feels like Fall here in Louisiana. I took a walk this mooring, I went a full mile, and it was
    > great. The birds were singing and I ended my walk reluctantly. I hope you are getting some Fall
    > weather where you are.
    >
    > David
     
  3. John Dunlop

    John Dunlop Guest

    David Rogers wrote:

    > It feels like Fall here in Louisiana. I took a walk this mooring, I went a full mile, and it
    > was great. The birds were singing and I ended my walk reluctantly.

    The morning is the best part of the day, in my view. On the walk I covered yesterday, the road was
    littered with pheasants, literally hundreds of them, scurrying around here and there. You can't beat
    a good stroll at dawn.

    > I hope you are getting some Fall weather where you are.

    The weather's fantastic here in Scotland just now, thanks, an Indian summer, if you like. I daresay
    the forecast predicts some rotten weather to come though. :-(

    --
    Jock
     
  4. David Rogers

    David Rogers Guest

    Sounds great in your part of the world. How cold does it get in the winter there ?

    On Thu, 18 Sep 2003 08:45:33 +0100, John Dunlop <[email protected]> wrote:

    >David Rogers wrote:
    >
    >> It feels like Fall here in Louisiana. I took a walk this mooring, I went a full mile, and it
    >> was great. The birds were singing and I ended my walk reluctantly.
    >
    >The morning is the best part of the day, in my view. On the walk I covered yesterday, the road was
    >littered with pheasants, literally hundreds of them, scurrying around here and there. You can't
    >beat a good stroll at dawn.
    >
    >> I hope you are getting some Fall weather where you are.
    >
    >The weather's fantastic here in Scotland just now, thanks, an Indian summer, if you like. I daresay
    >the forecast predicts some rotten weather to come though. :-(
     
  5. John Dunlop

    John Dunlop Guest

    David Rogers wrote:

    > Sounds great in your part of the world. How cold does it get in the winter there ?

    In the winter, daytime temperatures *can* reach 10-15 °C, although the maximum is generally around 5
    °C (41 °F). It can get cold inland during the night, making early mornings incredibly refreshing.
    According to the Met Office, the Highlands recorded the lowest temperature in Britain, a shivering
    -27 °C (-16.6 °F), in 1995.

    It's uncannily mild just now, and I'm hoping this peculiarity will persist a while yet.
    Fingers crossed!

    --
    Jock
     
  6. David Rogers

    David Rogers Guest

    Sounds like it's pretty cold at times but not too bad. We're blessed with a great winter climate in
    the southern part of the U.S. where I live. We're often still wearing short pants and short sleeve
    shirts through December. The only months when the temperature is likely to drop below freezing are
    January and February.

    But the summers, that's another story, makes you want to hibernate. We get lots of rain,
    too. How far did you say you were walking each day ? On Thu, 18 Sep 2003 15:13:25 +0100,
    John Dunlop <[email protected]> wrote:

    >David Rogers wrote:
    >
    >> Sounds great in your part of the world. How cold does it get in the winter there ?
    >
    >In the winter, daytime temperatures *can* reach 10-15 °C, although the maximum is generally around
    >5 °C (41 °F). It can get cold inland during the night, making early mornings incredibly refreshing.
    >According to the Met Office, the Highlands recorded the lowest temperature in Britain, a shivering
    >-27 °C (-16.6 °F), in 1995.
    >
    >It's uncannily mild just now, and I'm hoping this peculiarity will persist a while yet.
    >Fingers crossed!
     
  7. John Dunlop

    John Dunlop Guest

    David Rogers wrote:

    > How far did you say you were walking each day ?

    Well, my walking, and hence my newly-found interest in this 'group, is largely to encourage other
    family members who are pitiably inactive. We don't venture out for the sole purpose of walking every
    single day, but maybe two, three, or four times per week. We're sporadic walkers. Our jaunts last --
    weather permitting! -- between quarter of an hour and a couple of hours. The longest distance
    recently (last week) was four and a half miles.

    I also run four or five days a week, and cycle a fair number of miles too. The open air is
    magnificent: I've never used a treadmill. ;-)

    --
    Jock
     
  8. David Rogers

    David Rogers Guest

    Yes, I know what you mean about inspiring other family members. My wife walks fairly regularly but
    my son only walks far enough to get from the house to his car. You seem to be pretty active. I used
    to run when I was in school but as I got older I began to have problems with my knees. Although
    walking doesn't bother them running led to pain. During the winter, I spend a couple of days each
    month camping at a local state park. It offers me a chance to walk in new and beautiful areas which
    usually inspires me.

    David On Fri, 19 Sep 2003 20:02:35 +0100, John Dunlop <[email protected]> wrote:

    >David Rogers wrote:
    >
    >> How far did you say you were walking each day ?
    >
    >Well, my walking, and hence my newly-found interest in this 'group, is largely to encourage other
    >family members who are pitiably inactive. We don't venture out for the sole purpose of walking
    >every single day, but maybe two, three, or four times per week. We're sporadic walkers. Our jaunts
    >last -- weather permitting! -- between quarter of an hour and a couple of hours. The longest
    >distance recently (last week) was four and a half miles.
    >
    >I also run four or five days a week, and cycle a fair number of miles too. The open air is
    >magnificent: I've never used a treadmill. ;-)
     
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