The first century

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Olasnah, Jan 11, 2005.

  1. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    Thanks for the feedback.

    I have found that my chiropractor has helped me greatly in this area, but the position on the bike begins to wear me down. He has also given me a list of neck exercises to keep the area stronger.


    Not on 40 or 50 mile rides, but when I go to 60 it becomes discomforting and almost painful. However, as I start stretching the miles I will endure the pain rather than giving in. I guess it is just one more aggrivation of getting older and brutalizing my body when I was younger.
     


  2. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Believe if you're patient, and do the neck exercises, you'll gradually extend the miles you can ride. In 4-6 months, you may find your neck pain is no longer a big issue.

    But, everyone has limitations....lower back, knee pain, foot hot spots, saddle pain, etc. Riding long distances in comfort just isn't an easy proposition for most of us.
     
  3. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    I don't think that would help your neck. Take a look at some pictures of riders doing time trials or tiathalons. They're in a much more tucked position and their neck is craning upwards to be able to see. It puts the neck in a much more pronounced angle.

    I'm considering getting some clip-on aerobars but it would be to keep the pressure off of my hands and arms rather than for a more aerodynamic riding posture. Seems I've developed a touch of carpel tunnel in the past 6 months. When I wake up my hands will be so swollen and numb it's painful even to make a fist. After I've been awake for a couple hours and pop my knuckes repetedly they seem to be OK for the rest of the day. The only thing that would be causing it is riding the bike on the trainer as I don't train forearms anymore.

    It could be from beating yourself up when you were younger or it could be from a degenerative disc disease or possibly both. I know it's typical for lifters to have a few things out of whack as they age, but take a look at all the people going into your chiropracter's office. They aren't all lifters. In fact most of them probably look like they've never touch a weight. The human spine is a pretty flimsey peice of machinery. Too many moving parts.

    I used to go to a chiropracter that did seem to help out with my neck - military neck. Unfortunately, within just a few weeks of discontinuing the treatments my neck was in just as bad of shape as before - some discomfort, lack of mobility and it sounds like Rice Crispies when I turn my head from side to side. That's when I decided it wasn't worth it. I'm not willing to make 2 or 3 office visits a week just for temporary relief. If they can't "fix" the problem within a certain time frame I'll learn to live with the discomfort. Surgury is out of the question.
     
  4. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    Definately degenerated discs as I have seen in the x-rays. Small gaps closing down on the nerves.

    I agree on putting off surgery. I have a friend that is a professional wrestler by trade and after his neck was broken he almost died from a staff infection after the surgery.

    I can deal with the current pain level. It's not bad at all during normal activities.

    You guys are right. Once I think about it the aero position would make it worse.
     
  5. blazingpedals

    blazingpedals New Member

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    I agree with the suggestion to change bikes. I'm not out to evangelize, but sometimes there are good reasons to NOT ride those cool racing bikes.
     
  6. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    I forget what percentage of patients die from secondary infections in hospitals but it is quite high. Pretty scary if you ask me.

    Sounds like you may have gotten my x-rays by mistake. They sound exactly like mine anyway. I bet I'm about 1/2 inch shorter than I was in my early 20's.

    Blazingpedals is right on the money here. Nothing wrong with riding a non-cool bike, especially since nobody is going to be giving you any crap over it! Not if they have any sense anyway. I ride an MTB on the road much of the time as it has a more upright riding position. Although I have three road bikes, I still don't ride in the drops, uness it is on my Specialized Sequoia and the adjustable stem is angled all the way up. That's one comfy road bike.
     
  7. sparkywowo

    sparkywowo New Member

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    I would agree that completing 100 miles in one day is very doable from a base of shorter rides given that you follow Smart's remarks: pace yourself and eat and drink adequately. I shoot for 120-135 bpm while drinking 1 quart half strength Gatorade (1 pint gatorade 1 pint water) and eating 2 Fig Newtons--this is actually quite a bit of food, and amounts to about 200 calories--every 10 miles.
     
  8. allezkmiec

    allezkmiec New Member

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    My first century was solo, and hilly, during my first year of road cycling. My longest ever ride up to that point was about 45 miles. All I brought was gatorade and GU, and I stopped for pancakes at mile 65 or so. I still finished in just over 6 hours of riding time, so go figure.

    But seriously though, get to the point where you can comfortably do 50-60 miles, and you'll be fine. Just remember to eat right, hydrate right, and keep the pace low. always best to go slow at the start, because you can always speed up at the end. The last century I did, we sprinted for the town line at mile 99!

    Good luck.
     
  9. 6fhscjess

    6fhscjess Member

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    I don't know how you're bike is set up but you may want to raise your stem and also get a shorter stem and this would allow you to sit up more. Also if you are in the drops alot change to riding on the brake hoods or top of the bars. Also if you don't stand very often start standing more on climbs and at other times. Do some streching while on the bike.
    If you are doing all of these things already than you probably would need a recumbent for the longer rides. Good luck.
     
  10. 6fhscjess

    6fhscjess Member

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    Olasnah I do not know where you are located but if you're in the New England area there is a century called the flattest century in the east. It is put on by the Narragansett Bay Wheelmen and they have I believe a 25, 50 a metric century which I believe is 62 miles a 75 and 100 mile rides. It is held in early Sept. It is a supported ride and lots of fun and great for a 1st century unless you want lots of climbing. If you are located elsewhere check at your LBS or on line for century info.

    When you do it as others have stated stay well hydrated, eat well and even if you are feeling great don't get caught up with the ones that treat it like a race unless you really are at a very high level of conditioning. Have fun and good luck.
     
  11. kjellquist

    kjellquist New Member

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    Just adding on with some encouragement. A century is something, but nothing to be worried about. You CAN do it. Given enough food, water, and time I think anyone who can ride even 30 miles and get through a century. Training will just determine how long it takes and how you will feel at the end.

    Resist the urge to stare at the miles ticking by on the computer and just enjoy the ride!

    I also would suggest a large supported century. There's a great boost when you get in a nice paceline and 15 miles go by while you are chatting away.
     
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