The fixed gear saga continues...

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by David Nutter, Apr 23, 2003.

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  1. David Nutter

    David Nutter Guest

    A week ago I spent several hours in the garage building a wheel for my fixed gear project bike and
    eventually suceeded, after scrounging a dishing guage from the bike shop. The wheel was beautiful,
    strong and true. I was well impressed. Unfortunately, when I put it on the bike the rear brake
    caliper would no longer fit and a quick check with the dishing gauge revealed that the original
    wheel was dished incorrectly to allow the caliper to fit. They are devils these bike
    manufacturers...

    At this point a piscine odour was detected and I wheeled the machine to the LBS to let the mechanic
    have a look as my peice of string hadn't revealed any obvious rear-end misalignment.

    It turns out that the misalignment was not in the dropouts as I originally thought but ocurred
    because the rear triangle had been welded to the seat tube incorrectly when the frame was built.
    Consequently I can either re-dish the wheel so the brake fits (bad) or make do without a rear brake,
    rather a pity as I was going to screw a single speed freewheel onto the other side of the hub.

    To cap it all I've already barked my shins on the pedals; an injury very familiar from my first ever
    bike, also fixed gear. I will have to get the clipless pedals sorted out before I do myself a nasty.

    Aside: Anyone got a decent road bike frame with horizontal dropouts to sell?
    :)

    Regards,

    -david
     
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  2. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    David Nutter <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > It turns out that the misalignment was not in the dropouts as I originally thought but ocurred
    > because the rear triangle had been welded to the seat tube incorrectly when the frame was
    > built. Consequently I can either re-dish the wheel so the brake fits (bad) or make do without a
    > rear brake, rather a pity as I was going to screw a single speed freewheel onto the other side
    > of the hub.
    >

    Assuming nothing can be done in terms of frame realignment to fix the problem I would ditch the rear
    brake. The rear brake is not that important on a road bike and on a fixed you can happily live with
    just a front brake.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to
    adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  3. David Nutter

    David Nutter Guest

    Tony Raven <[email protected]> said:

    > Assuming nothing can be done in terms of frame realignment to fix the problem I would ditch the
    > rear brake. The rear brake is not that important on a road bike and on a fixed you can happily
    > live with just a front brake.

    Apparently the frame can't be realigned without cutting the rear triangle off the seat tube and
    re-welding it and the frame quality doesn't justify this operation. I'm currently running without a
    rear brake, so far without problems, but I do miss having a rear brake to use at junctions when I'm
    signalling right for example. I haven't yet got the hang of modulating my cadence to control the
    bike's speed[1] in these situations: I either stop completely and nearly fall off or go too quickly.

    The main problem is that the bike looks odd as the rear wheel is visibly offset to the right side of
    the bike at the top of the seat stays, though not at the dropouts. Though handling doesn't seem to
    be affected, I can't have a deformed bike :)

    Regards,

    -david

    [1] A wobbly 10mph or so...
     
  4. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    David Nutter <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > The main problem is that the bike looks odd as the rear wheel is visibly offset to the right side
    > of the bike at the top of the seat stays, though not at the dropouts. Though handling doesn't seem
    > to be affected, I can't have a deformed bike :)
    >

    I can't quite visualise the geometry but some bikes are built with asymmetric rear triangles so the
    rear wheel can be symmetrically spoked. Perhaps you have one of those frames.

    Tony

    -- http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to
    adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  5. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Hi David Welcome to singlespeed land! I have a ss mtb which I use as a bit of an all rounder - a
    great training machine. Freewheel, though - I haven't been brave enough to go fixed yet. I do have
    an old, but perfectly servicable Raleigh Record Sprint frame, which I can let go for a small
    consideration. It has 'semi' horizontal drop-outs. Let me know if you're interested (paul.a.hartigan
    at btinternet.com) Paul "David Nutter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > A week ago I spent several hours in the garage building a wheel for my
    fixed
    > gear project bike and eventually suceeded, after scrounging a dishing
    guage
    > from the bike shop. The wheel was beautiful, strong and true. I was well impressed. Unfortunately,
    > when I put it on the bike the rear brake caliper would no longer fit and a quick check with the
    > dishing gauge revealed that the original wheel was dished incorrectly to allow the caliper to fit.
    They
    > are devils these bike manufacturers...
    >
    > At this point a piscine odour was detected and I wheeled the machine to
    the
    > LBS to let the mechanic have a look as my peice of string hadn't revealed any obvious rear-end
    > misalignment.
    >
    > It turns out that the misalignment was not in the dropouts as I originally thought but ocurred
    > because the rear triangle had been welded to the seat tube incorrectly when the frame was built.
    > Consequently I can either
    re-dish
    > the wheel so the brake fits (bad) or make do without a rear brake, rather
    a
    > pity as I was going to screw a single speed freewheel onto the other side
    of
    > the hub.
    >
    > To cap it all I've already barked my shins on the pedals; an injury very familiar from my first
    > ever bike, also fixed gear. I will have to get the clipless pedals sorted out before I do myself
    > a nasty.
    >
    > Aside: Anyone got a decent road bike frame with horizontal dropouts to
    sell?
    > :)
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > -david
     
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