The Fred Bent of 2003?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Tony, Jan 27, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.


  1. Tritonrider

    Tritonrider Guest

  2. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    Funny thing - do you remember that there was an article in Popular Science or some such about a
    decade or more ago in which they described a sort of bicycle freeway system for Los Angelos that
    looked a whole lot like that?

    "TritonRider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >From: [email protected] (Tony)
    >
    > >http://www.go-one.biz/ukindex.shtml
    >
    > Pretty cool in a fredly sort of way, but 7000Euro for a basic model?
    No thanks
    > I'll take a hand built Sachs or Mondonico first. Bill C.
     
  3. "Tony" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > http://www.go-one.biz/ukindex.shtml

    Looks cool, but:
    - where is the 5 foot tall flag so SUVs can see me?
    - 52x13 maximum gearing, wouldn't this low aero-bent design require at least a 55x11?

    --
    Dominic Richens | [email protected] "I have seen the future, and it is just like the
    present, only longer"
    - Kehlog Albran, "The Profit"
     
  4. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    [email protected] (TritonRider) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >From: "Tom Kunich"
    >
    > >Funny thing - do you remember that there was an article in Popular Science or some such about a
    > >decade or more ago in which they described a sort of bicycle freeway system for Los Angelos that
    > >looked a whole lot like that?
    > >
    >
    > No, I don't remember seeing it. One of my objections to it would be riding alongside and in
    > traffic. You're down low and drivers aren't looking for something like this. Somewhere with lots
    > of bike lanes and a good awareness program could be a good around/go to town vehicle.

    As I recall they proposed a system of freeways in which vehicles that looked very much like these
    would be able to enter and work into traffic so tight that everyone would be in a tight draft the
    whole time. They would be in a system sort of like a ditch so that you could only exit at specific
    exits like a freeway. The passengers would be completely protected from the elements and so they
    wouldn't go really fast and cause the driver to sweat uncomfortably.

    The idea was that the traffic would move along at a more or less steady 25 mph.
     
  5. Jeff Pooter

    Jeff Pooter Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tony <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : http://www.go-one.biz/ukindex.shtml
    >
    > 265 cm long so it won't be "USCF legal". Sorry.
    >
    > PS. Just had to forward for the bent folks. Replies hopefully go only to .racing :)

    Sometimes I read proposals for how to make recumbents and other alt.hpv's more popular in the world
    of cycling.

    Money to *upright* racers and racing might really help.

    How did the fancy composite bikes, weird geometry bikes and wild aerobars and wheels all become
    race-legal in the USCF? And required items in so many races? ---Not just because they worked. That
    would make the world too simple.

    Scott, Kestrel, Trispoke and those type of guys made their bed, now they're lounging in it! They
    paid their dues. They sponsored teams and offered stuff as prizes and gave special prices to racers
    and hosted events and series and now their acceptance is a done deal.

    Classic style bikes and gear are all that are allowed in UCI events, which NOT coincedently are of
    oldworld Euro descent. USCF allows more radical gear---because innovative US manufacturers have
    played their cards right.

    Fairings and HPVs are a category of bike/trike that are ideally suited to the HUGE distances
    possible in US racing and ultra-racing (and common in commuting and touring). They also offer
    numerous other advantages: weatherproofing, comfort, safety, cargo.

    So I think it would be neat if recumbent manufacturers like Lightning, Rans, Vision, EasyRacer and
    Rotator would all give CREDIT CARDS to a regular upright bike racing team! Plus give them FREE HPVs
    and make them ride them (if they ride em they'll like em). Plus give them JERSEYS and MAGNETIC
    SLOGAN & LOGO SIGNS for their cars.

    The jerseys and signs could all have slogans like: "Go Bent! No more sore butt ever again! Double
    your speed lying down! Have a cozy ultramarathon! Smile all day!"

    I think even upright racers will ride these rigs to get in highspeed, low-stress miles and hours.
    Their grins and fun will make it a done deal.

    Also, the sponsors could require participation in regular HPV races. If top upright racers rode the
    HPV circuit, event records would come a-tumblin' down and the upright world would open its eyes to
    the speed, sensibility and comfort of faired, bent racing.

    Also, the HPV sponsors should host USCF events and series (and have HPV races at these events if
    they like) and offer to lodge various VIPs, etc.

    HPV companies should donate money and bikes (and trikes!) to USCF programs. And of course the whole
    time they can lobby Board members as they please.

    Then we would see that within a few years the USCF would offer an 'OPEN' class of racing for various
    events, starting with the time trial. Done deal.

    Of course, we gotta find the HPV company willing to jump first...

    --
    JP
     
  6. Methinks we got us a little troll here.
     
  7. [email protected] (Tom Kunich) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (TritonRider) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > >From: "Tom Kunich"
    >
    > > >Funny thing - do you remember that there was an article in Popular Science or some such about a
    > > >decade or more ago in which they described a sort of bicycle freeway system for Los Angelos
    > > >that looked a whole lot like that?
    > > >
    > >
    > > No, I don't remember seeing it. One of my objections to it would be riding alongside and in
    > > traffic. You're down low and drivers aren't looking for something like this. Somewhere with
    > > lots of bike lanes and a good awareness program could be a good around/go to town vehicle.
    >
    > As I recall they proposed a system of freeways in which vehicles that looked very much like these
    > would be able to enter and work into traffic so tight that everyone would be in a tight draft the
    > whole time. They would be in a system sort of like a ditch so that you could only exit at specific
    > exits like a freeway. The passengers would be completely protected from the elements and so they
    > wouldn't go really fast and cause the driver to sweat uncomfortably.
    >
    > The idea was that the traffic would move along at a more or less steady 25 mph.

    The same or a similar article was the the San Francisco Chronicle in '80. The same time the 'screw
    the arabs- ride a bike' bumper sticker was popular. How history is repeating itself!

    Chris Jordan Santa Cruz, Ca.
     
  8. Qui si parla Campagnolo <[email protected]> wrote:
    : jeff potter-<< They also offer numerous other advantages: weatherproofing, comfort, safety, cargo.
    : >><BR><BR> << "Go Bent! No more sore butt ever again! Double your speed lying down! Have a cozy
    : ultramarathon! Smile all day!" >><BR><BR> << I think even upright racers will ride these rigs to
    : get in highspeed, low-stress miles and hours. Their grins and fun will make it a done deal.
    : >><BR><BR>

    : If these designs were such an innovation, why haven't they caught on? They are not new, have been
    : around for decades...

    Maybe you have to ask somebody specializing in research about spreading of innovation :) Maybe the
    current (since late 70's?) growth rate of bent world is 'normal' for a 'superior' innovation. Take a
    look at MTBs or Linux for example, they took years to creep all over the place, and still not
    everybody uses them.

    : Maybe not the smile creator that you say they are. Maybe not the cycling panacea at all...maybe.

    Maybe :) I view bents as more specialized breed of thing than upright, superior in their own field
    but in general with more limitations. That could change, though :-/

    : Maybe the over 100 year old design of the upright is a pretty good one, that satisfies the
    : requirement to tranmit human power to locomotion well.

    If this wasn't true, maybe lots more people would be riding bents. Or maybe people wouldn't be
    riding much at all...

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  9. Also fully-faired, so not USCF / UCI / RTTC-legal either...

    P.S. I'd like to know who these "HPV Sponsors" of whom "Jeff Pooter" speaks are. I think most HPV
    organisations and/or recumbent manufacturers would go broke if required to put up a bunch of
    so-called "VIPs" (i.e. suits / blazers) in the style to which they have become accustomed...

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  10. In rec.bicycles.racing Dave Larrington <[email protected]> wrote:
    : P.S. I'd like to know who these "HPV Sponsors" of whom "Jeff Pooter" speaks are. I think most HPV
    : organisations and/or recumbent manufacturers would go broke if required to put up a bunch of
    : so-called "VIPs" (i.e. suits / blazers) in the style to which they have become accustomed...

    Maybe great marketing ideas don't come from imitation, but then again how about these:

    Exercise on your sofa! WIN RACES SECRETLY Reduce inches fast where it counts! Increase safety for
    just under $2000

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  11. Les Earnest

    Les Earnest Guest

    Jeff Pooter wrote:
    > Classic style bikes and gear are all that are allowed in UCI events, which NOT coincedently are of
    > oldworld Euro descent. USCF allows more radical gear---because innovative US manufacturers have
    > played their cards right.

    Dave Larrington responds:
    > P.S. I'd like to know who these "HPV Sponsors" of whom "Jeff Pooter" speaks are. I think most HPV
    > organisations and/or recumbent manufacturers would go broke if required to put up a bunch of
    > so-called "VIPs" (i.e. suits / blazers) in the style to which they have become accustomed...

    Indeed, Jeff's claim is a fabrication. USCF rules were liberalized so as to allow short
    wheelbase recumbents in 1979 as part of a complete rewrite of the racing rules that year by UCI
    Commissaire Artie Greenberg and me. We had no input from the 'bent industry because it didn't
    exist at that time.

    UCI subsequently created all kinds of silly dimensional rules that changed yearly for a time, while
    USCF bicycle geometry rules have remained relatively stable in the intervening 23 years.

    -Les Earnest
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...