The future's Orange bicycles

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Tony Raven, Feb 20, 2004.

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  1. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    From today's Guaridan

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/story/0,3604,1150361,00.html

    Look, no hands: a phone-bike combo

    Richard Wray Wednesday February 18, 2004 The Guardian

    Hands-free kits are already commonplace in cars, but yesterday mobile phone operator Orange went one
    better, offering cycle-mad customers the chance to pedal and talk in safety. The company is offering
    new customers in the Netherlands, where bikes outnumber people, a free cycle with a handsfree kit.
    The bike is also fitted with a charger that tops up the phone's battery on the move. The giveaway
    was the brainchild of Orange's Dutch chief financial operator Bernard Uyttendaele, who saw that the
    company was offering motorists a free hands-free kit but not extending the same courtesy to
    cyclists. The Dutch authorities have outlawed using a mobile phone while driving, introducing
    similar laws to those brought in by the UK government last year. The change in the law, however, did
    not affect the Netherlands' legions of cyclists who can still be seen weaving around the region's
    towns and cities while clutching their mobile phones to their ears. More than 1.2 million Dutch
    people - roughly a quarter of the country's workforce - cycle to work every day. "Mobile operators
    give away handsets or even DVD players to customers, but many people are quite happy with their
    handset. This package makes a lot of sense in Holland," the company said yesterday. Orange is only
    offering its bike and handset combination to new customers willing to tie themselves into a contract
    for two years. Traditionally mobile phone companies attract new customers by offering them an up-
    to-date handset. Under Orange's Dutch cyclist offer customers retain their existing phone. The phone
    plugs into a cradle on the bike's handlebars, which allows it to communicate with a headset worn by
    the cyclist using bluetooth short wave radio technology.
     
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  2. On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 18:11:41 -0000, Tony Raven <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > From today's Guaridan
    [...]
    > Hands-free kits are already commonplace in cars, but yesterday mobile phone operator Orange went
    > one better, offering cycle-mad customers the chance to pedal and talk in safety. The company is
    > offering new customers in the Netherlands, where bikes outnumber people, a free cycle with a
    > handsfree kit.

    Will it be an Orange (or just orange) bike?

    Colin
    --
     
  3. Burt

    Burt Guest

    "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > From today's Guaridan
    >
    > http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/story/0,3604,1150361,00.html
    >
    > Look, no hands: a phone-bike combo
    >
    > Richard Wray Wednesday February 18, 2004 The Guardian
    >
    > Hands-free kits are already commonplace in cars, but yesterday mobile
    phone
    > operator Orange went one better, offering cycle-mad customers the chance
    to
    > pedal and talk in safety.

    This would be the same Orange company that, with Smart cars, offered the first built-in hands-free
    car phone? At the time, last year, they were making all kinds of claims about how much safer that
    would be, and planting stories in the tame press to the same effect. Since the claims were made on
    their own website, and the press reports were "factual" stories, neither were paid advertising and
    they couldn't be reported to the Advertising Standards Authority. I can't find the original article
    on their website, nor on the Smart cars, so I can only assume they have dropped it.
     
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