The hacksaw blade. Use as necessary.

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Carla A-G, Apr 30, 2003.

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  1. Carla A-G

    Carla A-G Guest

    A little bit of work was required on Jim's hardtail. A new bottom bracket and Raceface crankset were
    to be installed. The old bottom bracket and crapola Truvative crankset were removed successfully.
    They had been nothing but problems since day one. ISIS ain't all that its cracked up to be. So we
    changed it back to square taper with the new bb and cranks.

    The new bb was installed successfully. The rockring was removed off the old crankset and was to be
    transplanted to the new crankset. A major problem arose. Due to a little bit of CNC'd metal on the
    Kona rockring, it would not fit correctly on the new crankset. The rockring would not sit flush
    with the bolts because of the width of the crankarm. The crankarm on the new crankset was wider
    than the old crankarm, so the rockring could not fit to be bolted onto the middle ring. What to do,
    what to do...

    The lightbulbs went off in our heads. Just make a cutout in the rockring where the crankarm goes,
    that would provide enough clearance in order to fit the rockring. Voila! The hacksaw blade was
    located. The rockring was put in the vise. The cutting began. A little cutout was made in the
    rockring, just enough to slide the crankarm in between. The rockring was installed on the crank. The
    fit was perfect. The bike works again. Time to ride...

    Next on the agenda, my new wheels and brakes...hacksaw blade not necessary...I hope...

    - CA-G

    Can-Am Girls Kick Ass!
     
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  2. "Carla A-G" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > A little bit of work was required on Jim's hardtail. A new bottom bracket and Raceface crankset
    > were to be installed. The old bottom bracket and crapola Truvative crankset were removed
    > successfully. They had been
    nothing
    > but problems since day one. ISIS ain't all that its cracked up to be. So
    we
    > changed it back to square taper with the new bb and cranks.
    >
    > The new bb was installed successfully. The rockring was removed off the
    old
    > crankset and was to be transplanted to the new crankset. A major problem arose. Due to a little
    > bit of CNC'd metal on the Kona rockring, it would
    not
    > fit correctly on the new crankset. The rockring would not sit flush with
    the
    > bolts because of the width of the crankarm. The crankarm on the new
    crankset
    > was wider than the old crankarm, so the rockring could not fit to be
    bolted
    > onto the middle ring. What to do, what to do...
    >
    > The lightbulbs went off in our heads. Just make a cutout in the rockring where the crankarm goes,
    > that would provide enough clearance in order to
    fit
    > the rockring. Voila! The hacksaw blade was located. The rockring was put
    in
    > the vise. The cutting began. A little cutout was made in the rockring,
    just
    > enough to slide the crankarm in between. The rockring was installed on the crank. The fit was
    > perfect. The bike works again. Time to ride...
    >
    > Next on the agenda, my new wheels and brakes...hacksaw blade not necessary...I hope...
    >
    > - CA-G
    >
    > Can-Am Girls Kick Ass!
    >
    >

    If that blade were on a reciprocating saw, you'd have the ultimate tool!

    Craig Brossman
     
  3. Ozarkmtbr

    Ozarkmtbr Guest

    Get a dremel....then you can fix ANYTHING!

    OzarkMtbr
     
  4. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    On Wed, 30 Apr 2003 12:27:32 -0500, "OzarkMtbr" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Get a dremel....then you can fix ANYTHING!
    >
    >OzarkMtbr
    >

    pretty damn much...
     
  5. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Carla A-G" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > The lightbulbs went off in our heads. Just make a cutout in the rockring where the crankarm goes,
    > that would provide enough clearance in order to
    fit
    > the rockring. Voila! The hacksaw blade was located. The rockring was put
    in
    > the vise. The cutting began. A little cutout was made in the rockring,
    just
    > enough to slide the crankarm in between. The rockring was installed on the crank. The fit was
    > perfect. The bike works again. Time to ride...
    >
    > Next on the agenda, my new wheels and brakes...hacksaw blade not necessary...I hope...
    >

    My friend Tom, one of the bike mechanics at Snowshoe, went to Barnett's Bicycle Institute for
    training last year. They taught him the most important tool for working on DH bikes was a hacksaw.

    Mike - I know wa'cher thinking Jer, that's not what he meant. ;^)
     
  6. "Carla A-G" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > A little bit of work was required on Jim's hardtail. A new bottom bracket and Raceface crankset
    > were to be installed. The old bottom bracket and crapola Truvative crankset were removed
    > successfully. They had been
    nothing
    > but problems since day one. ISIS ain't all that its cracked up to be. So
    we
    > changed it back to square taper with the new bb and cranks.

    I wouldn't bash ISIS untill you get a good raceface cranks and bb that uses the system. After
    carfull research I have discovered that the Truvtiv cranks and bbs are made of an alloy of cheese
    and old socks.

    Al
     
  7. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    OzarkMtbr <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Get a dremel....then you can fix ANYTHING!
    >
    > OzarkMtbr

    ADremel is just a girl's Angle Grinder, dude. Sheeeiit........

    Shaun aRe
     
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