the mashed-potatoes test for whose ship you're on.

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Alan Horowitz, Feb 18, 2004.

  1. American ships will always present the gravy of the mashed potatoes, as a "lake" within a formed
    hollow in the middle of the stuff.

    It may or may not overflow. The readiness of the cook for promotion should be judged by his/her
    ability to form the final result in one smooth movement.

    It's a pleasant diversion from the fact that yesterday's Salisbury steak is today's beef-and-barley
    soup. By the way, how come the Merchant Marine only permits barley to be served in soup, never as a
    vegetable?!? They serve white rice three times a day, every day (hint: former US colony); but
    barley, which tastes ten times better and is healthier, is taboo.

    I'm surprised that the congressional delegation from North Dakota isn't all over this issue....
     
    Tags:


  2. Tank

    Tank Guest

    "Alan Horowitz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > American ships will always present the gravy of the mashed potatoes, as a "lake" within a formed
    > hollow in the middle of the stuff.
    >
    > It may or may not overflow. The readiness of the cook for promotion should be judged by his/her
    > ability to form the final result in one smooth movement.
    >
    > It's a pleasant diversion from the fact that yesterday's Salisbury steak is today's beef-and-
    > barley soup. By the way, how come the Merchant Marine only permits barley to be served in soup,
    > never as a vegetable?!? They serve white rice three times a day, every day (hint: former US
    > colony); but barley, which tastes ten times better and is healthier, is taboo.
    >
    > I'm surprised that the congressional delegation from North Dakota isn't all over this issue....

    How do you prepare and serve barley? I have never seen it in anything other than soup. (Well, not
    counting beer) It sounds very interesting.

    --
    Tank

    This Space To Let.
     
  3. Derek Lyons

    Derek Lyons Guest

    "Tank" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How do you prepare and serve barley? I have never seen it in anything other than soup. (Well, not
    >counting beer) It sounds very interesting.

    Much like any other grain, cook it with water till done. :)

    Seriously, your local megamart grocery store should have barley near the rice, and many packages
    will have recipes. Using the recipes search function at foodtv.com brings up some interesting
    looking recipes as well.

    D.
    --
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  4. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "Tank" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    :
    : "Alan Horowitz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    : news:[email protected]...
    : > American ships will always present the gravy of the mashed
    potatoes,
    : > as a "lake" within a formed hollow in the middle of the
    stuff.
    : >
    : > It may or may not overflow. The readiness of the cook for
    promotion
    : > should be judged by his/her ability to form the final result
    in one
    : > smooth movement.
    : >
    : > It's a pleasant diversion from the fact that yesterday's
    Salisbury
    : > steak is today's beef-and-barley soup. By the way, how come
    the
    : > Merchant Marine only permits barley to be served in soup,
    never as a
    : > vegetable?!? They serve white rice three times a day,
    every day
    : > (hint: former US colony); but barley, which tastes ten times
    better
    : > and is healthier, is taboo.
    : >
    : > I'm surprised that the congressional delegation from North
    Dakota
    : > isn't all over this issue....
    :
    : How do you prepare and serve barley? I have never seen it in anything other than soup. (Well, not
    : counting beer) It sounds very interesting.
    :
    : --
    : Tank
    : ============

    I always cook my barley with mushrooms and onions. The original recipe that I (actually pretty much
    follow... LOL) comes from one of the Frugal Gourmet cookbooks. It's under the Scotland section...
    let me know if you'd like me to post it.

    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  5. It's a pleasant diversion from the fact that yesterday's Salisbury
    : steak is today's beef-and-barley soup. By the way, how come the Merchant Marine only permits
    : barley to be served in soup, never as a vegetable?!? They serve white rice three times a day,
    : every day (hint: former US colony); but barley, which tastes ten times better and is healthier,
    : is taboo.

    Raised on a farm in the true American style, I was amazed to find upon joining the Navy that
    they served rice with every meal. In my youth any rice on the table qualified as a (rare)
    "Chinese" dinner. Likewise such exotic dishes as fried Okra. Side dishes other than some
    form of potato? Incredible! And what congressman did the folks at the "Trappey's Bull" hot
    sauce company pay off to get that contract? There may be no salt and pepper shaker at your
    table, but there were always multiple bottles of hot sauce...

    : I'm surprised that the congressional delegation from North Dakota

    I don't know all the details, but aren't there periodic spats about the government requiring
    'real' butter, no low cal/fat substitutes? Even the Israelis had trouble matching the dairy
    lobby where I grew up... IIRC local schoola are *prohibited* from even offering cows milk
    substitutes (like soy milk), I wonder if the navy is the same...

    When it's all said and done, however, perhaps the most telling statistic about Navy chow is
    that 16% of people in uniform are 'obese' by body fat standards. (that from the most recent
    'Navy Times'). The Navy is trying to get people to eat healthier, etc. Geeze, after going to
    all that trouble getting McDs and BK on base..... :)

    regards,
    -----------------------------------------------
    [email protected]
     
  6. Tom

    Tom Guest

    "Alan Horowitz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > American ships will always present the gravy of the mashed potatoes, as a "lake" within a formed
    > hollow in the middle of the stuff.
    >
    > It may or may not overflow. The readiness of the cook for promotion should be judged by his/her
    > ability to form the final result in one smooth movement.
    >
    > It's a pleasant diversion from the fact that yesterday's Salisbury steak is today's beef-and-
    > barley soup. By the way, how come the Merchant Marine only permits barley to be served in soup,
    > never as a vegetable?!? They serve white rice three times a day, every day (hint: former US
    > colony); but barley, which tastes ten times better and is healthier, is taboo.
    >
    > I'm surprised that the congressional delegation from North Dakota isn't all over this issue....

    Mmm barley... sounds like a side dish that needs to be in my next beer dinner. Any successful
    recipes? I stuffed a chicken breast the other day with cooked brown rice mixed with olive oil, fresh
    thyme and pine nuts. I wonder if barley would soak up those flavors just as well...

    Tom
     
  7. "Tank" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > "Alan Horowitz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> American ships will always present the gravy of the mashed potatoes, as a "lake" within a formed
    >> hollow in the middle of the stuff.
    >>
    >> It may or may not overflow. The readiness of the cook for promotion should be judged by his/her
    >> ability to form the final result in one smooth movement.
    >>
    >> It's a pleasant diversion from the fact that yesterday's Salisbury steak is today's beef-and-
    >> barley soup. By the way, how come the Merchant Marine only permits barley to be served in soup,
    >> never as a vegetable?!? They serve white rice three times a day, every day (hint: former US
    >> colony); but barley, which tastes ten times better and is healthier, is taboo.
    >>
    >> I'm surprised that the congressional delegation from North Dakota isn't all over this issue....
    >
    > How do you prepare and serve barley? I have never seen it in anything other than soup. (Well, not
    > counting beer) It sounds very interesting.
    >
    > --
    > Tank
    >
    > This Space To Let.

    My favorite way is baked with mushrooms and onion...

    Baked Barley

    4 ounces butter 1 Onion, 1/4" dice
    1/2 pound Mushrooms, sliced or quartered 1 cup Barley 2 cups Hot beef, chicken, vegetable stock
    1 teaspoon Chopped fresh rosemary (1/2 teaspoon dried)
    2/2 teaspoon Salt, or to taste

    Melt butter and sauté onions and mushrooms until onions are transparent. Mix onions, mushrooms,
    barley, rosemary, salt, and one cup of boiling stock in a casserole with a tight fitting lid.

    Bake in 300 degree F oven for 45 minutes, stirring several times. Add second cup of hot stock
    and continue baking 30 to 40 minutes or until barley is tender and mixture has absorbed most of
    the liquid.

    Variation: Add 2 tablespoons minced parsley; 1/2 to 1 teaspoons of your favorite herbs.

    Wayne
     
  8. On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 20:46:34 -0500, "Tank" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >How do you prepare and serve barley? I have never seen it in anything other than soup. (Well, not
    >counting beer) It sounds very interesting.
    >
    "Pearled" barley can be used like rice. I haven't tried it in a risotto-like treatment, but I
    probably will in the near future.

    Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a

    "In this house we _obey_ the laws of thermodynamics." --Homer Simpson
     
  9. Lynn Gifford

    Lynn Gifford Guest

    [email protected] (Alan Horowitz) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>... (snip) By the way, how come the
    > Merchant Marine only permits barley to be served in soup, never as a vegetable?!? They serve white
    > rice three times a day, every day (hint: former US colony); but barley, which tastes ten times
    > better and is healthier, is taboo.
    >
    > I'm surprised that the congressional delegation from North Dakota isn't all over this issue....

    Actually, all the barley in North Dakota belongs to Anheuser-Busch. And the potatoes are all
    contracted to McDonalds. We are, however, the largest honey producer and have plenty for sale.

    Lynn from Fargo (North Dakota) Had any "sunbutter" lately?
     
  10. Sportkite1

    Sportkite1 Guest

    >From: "Tom"

    >Mmm barley... sounds like a side dish that needs to be in my next beer dinner. Any successful
    >recipes? I stuffed a chicken breast the other day with cooked brown rice mixed with olive oil,
    >fresh thyme and pine nuts. I wonder if barley would soak up those flavors just as well...
    >
    >Tom

    Regarding rice and other grains, one should eat the "whole version" rather than the refined for the
    most health benefits. Pearl Barley is refined and IMHO should be avoided. However whole hull-less
    barley is delicious and can be used similarly to brown rice.

    Here is a link to Bob's Red Mill - a source for whole hull-less barley. The page has links to
    several recipes you might find useful.

    http://www.bobsredmill.com/recipe/ingredient.php?pid=61

    Ellen
     
  11. Steven James Forsberg <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > : It's a pleasant diversion from the fact that yesterday's Salisbury steak is today's beef-and-
    > : barley soup. By the way, how come the Merchant Marine only permits barley to be served in soup,
    > : never as a vegetable?!? They serve white rice three times a day, every day (hint: former US
    > : colony); but barley, which tastes ten times better and is healthier, is taboo.
    >
    > Raised on a farm in the true American style, I was amazed to find upon joining the Navy that
    > they served rice with every meal. In my youth any rice on the table qualified as a (rare)
    > "Chinese" dinner. Likewise such exotic dishes as fried Okra. Side dishes other than some
    > form of potato? Incredible! And what congressman did the folks at the "Trappey's Bull" hot
    > sauce company pay off to get that contract? There may be no salt and pepper shaker at your
    > table, but there were always multiple bottles of hot sauce...
    >
    > : I'm surprised that the congressional delegation from North Dakota
    >
    > I don't know all the details, but aren't there periodic spats about the government requiring
    > 'real' butter, no low cal/fat substitutes? Even the Israelis had trouble matching the dairy
    > lobby where I grew up... IIRC local schoola are *prohibited* from even offering cows milk
    > substitutes (like soy milk), I wonder if the navy is the same...
    >
    > When it's all said and done, however, perhaps the most telling statistic about Navy chow is
    > that 16% of people in uniform are 'obese' by body fat standards. (that from the most recent
    > 'Navy Times'). The Navy is trying to get people to eat healthier, etc. Geeze, after going to
    > all that trouble getting McDs and BK on base..... :)
    >
    >

    Clue: potatoes are bulky, rice is not. I used to wonder why hominy is the rare product and grits
    the common?

    hominy

    hominy [Algonquian], hulled corn with the germ removed and served either ground or whole. The
    pioneers in North America prepared it by soaking the kernels in weak wood lye until the hulls
    floated to the top. Hominy is boiled until tender and served as a vegetable. Hominy grits (hominy
    ground into small grains) are boiled and served as a vegetable or as a cereal, or they may be
    shaped into patties and fried; they are especially popular in the S United States. Samp is a type
    of coarse hominy.

    grits Pronunciation: (grits), [key] —n. (used with a sing. or pl. v.)
    1. Also called hominy grits. coarsely ground hominy, boiled and sometimes then fried, eaten as a
    breakfast dish or as a side dish with meats.
    2. grain hulled and coarsely ground.
     
  12. Mactan

    Mactan Guest

    On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 03:06:14 +0000 (UTC), Steven James Forsberg
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > When it's all said and done, however, perhaps the most telling statistic about Navy chow is
    > that 16% of people in uniform are 'obese' by body fat standards.

    What a coincidence! That's the very same percentage of females in the Navy.
     
  13. William

    William Guest

    On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 02:12:24 GMT, [email protected] (Derek
    Lyons) wrote:

    >"Tank" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>How do you prepare and serve barley? I have never seen it in anything other than soup. (Well, not
    >>counting beer) It sounds very interesting.
    >
    >Much like any other grain, cook it with water till done. :)
    >
    >Seriously, your local megamart grocery store should have barley near the rice, and many packages
    >will have recipes. Using the recipes search function at foodtv.com brings up some interesting
    >looking recipes as well.

    Grits is far, far better and you can mix cheese with them if you're a yankee.

    >D.
     
  14. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Mactan, Man wrote:

    > What a coincidence! That's the very same percentage of females in the Navy.

    I was given to understand that short people were steered towards the navy given the size
    restrictions of ships/etc. Perhaps that would explain your odd observation.

    nancy
     
  15. Tank

    Tank Guest

    "Rick & Cyndi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s54...
    > :
    > : How do you prepare and serve barley? I have never seen it in anything other than soup. (Well,
    > : not counting beer) It sounds very interesting.
    > :
    > : --
    > : Tank
    > : ============
    >
    > I always cook my barley with mushrooms and onions. The original recipe that I (actually pretty
    > much follow... LOL) comes from one of the Frugal Gourmet cookbooks. It's under the Scotland
    > section... let me know if you'd like me to post it.
    >
    > --
    > Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply>
    >

    Please do! It sounds really good!

    --
    Tank

    This Space To Let.
     
  16. Jeff Crowell

    Jeff Crowell Guest

    Jack Linthicum wrote:
    > I used to wonder why hominy is the rare product and grits the common?

    Indeed! Hominy is a right smashing addition to chili, soups, and stews. Seems to be a fixture in the
    cuisine of our friends south of the border. Sometimes the only place I can find it in the
    supermarket is on the 'Mexican food' aisle.

    Jeff
     
  17. Derek Lyons

    Derek Lyons Guest

    "Jeff Crowell" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Jack Linthicum wrote:
    >> I used to wonder why hominy is the rare product and grits the common?
    >
    >Indeed! Hominy is a right smashing addition to chili, soups, and stews. Seems to be a fixture in
    >the cuisine of our friends south of the border. Sometimes the only place I can find it in the
    >supermarket is on the 'Mexican food' aisle.

    Unless you live in the American South (where it is a staple <g>).

    D.
    --
    The STS-107 Columbia Loss FAQ can be found at the following URLs:

    Text-Only Version: http://www.io.com/~o_m/columbia_loss_faq.html

    Enhanced HTML Version: http://www.io.com/~o_m/columbia_loss_faq_x.html

    Corrections, comments, and additions should be e-mailed to [email protected], as well as posted to
    sci.space.history and sci.space.shuttle for discussion.
     
  18. "Jeff Crowell" <[email protected]> wrote

    > Indeed! Hominy is a right smashing addition to chili, soups, and stews. Seems to be a fixture in
    > the cuisine of our friends south of the border. Sometimes the only place I can find it in the
    > supermarket is on the 'Mexican food' aisle.

    Called pozole or, (not really,) mote(*).

    Yellow grits do well in recipes that call for polenta, though they aren't really the same. The
    yellow variety has slightly more dietary virtue than white hominy/grits.

    (*) Goya, a Puerto Rico-based food business, is making a considerable effort to get into the US/MX
    border market and is producing a bunch of stuff that never came within 1,000 km of PR. They started
    marketing hominy under the name "mote", which my PRian correspondents never heard of. Ditto local
    MXian correspondents; why Goya didn't pick up on the absolutely standard "pozole" is a mystery.
     
  19. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Rick & Cyndi wrote:

    >
    > : How do you prepare and serve barley? I have never seen it in anything other than soup. (Well,
    > : not counting beer) It sounds very interesting.
    > :
    > : --
    > : Tank
    > : =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
    >
    > I always cook my barley with mushrooms and onions. The original recipe that I (actually pretty
    > much follow... LOL) comes from one of the Frugal Gourmet cookbooks. It's under the Scotland
    > section... let me know if you'd like me to post it.
    >

    We frequently do a barely pilaf. Melt some butter in a heavy pot and saut=E9 onions until they start
    to soften, then toss in sliced mushrooms and barley and stir it around for a few minutes. Add beef
    stock, cover and bake it for about an hour.
     
  20. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "Tank" & Cyndi

    : > :
    : > : How do you prepare and serve barley? I have never seen it in anything other than soup. (Well,
    : > : not counting beer) It sounds very interesting.
    : > :
    : > : --
    : > : Tank
    : > : ============
    : >
    : > I always cook my barley with mushrooms and onions. The
    original
    : > recipe that I (actually pretty much follow... LOL) comes from
    one
    : > of the Frugal Gourmet cookbooks. It's under the Scotland section... let me know if you'd like me
    : > to post it.
    : >
    : > --
    : > Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply>
    : >
    :
    : Please do! It sounds really good!
    :
    : --
    : Tank
    :
    :=====

    Hi! Sorry it took me so long to post this...

    Barley and Mushroom Casserole (From The Frugal Gourmet "On our Immigrant Ancestors" page 446)

    6 TBSP butter 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 yellow onions, minced 1 # mushrooms, thinly sliced 1 c
    pearl barley
    1/2 TBSP dried basil 3 c chicken stock Salt & freshly ground pepper
    2/4 c chopped parsley

    Preheat oven to 375 F.

    Melt the butter in a 2 qt. stove-top covered casserole. Add the garlic and onion and sauté over
    moderately low heat until onion is translucent, about 5 minutes.

    Add the mushrooms and sauté over moderate heat until mushrooms are golden, about 5 minutes.

    Add the barley and basil to the mushroom mixture, and toss lightly, then pour in the chicken stock
    and season to taste with salt and pepper.

    Slowly bring the casserole to to boil, then remove it from the heat. Cover the casserole and bake in
    the oven until the barley is tender, about 45-50 minutes.

    Before serving, add the chopped parsley and toss gently. Serve piping hot. Serves 6-8
     
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