The most frequently confused words I see in bicycling forums

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Colorado Bicycler, Dec 9, 2005.

  1. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Remember - It's is ALWAYS a contraction of "It is".


    Except when it's a contraction of "it has". But it's rarely been used
    that way.

    --
    Ray Heindl
    (remove the Xs to reply)
     


  2. Bill Sornson wrote on Saturday 10 December 2005 21:55:

    > Brian Sanderson wrote:
    >> Knit pick - nit pick
    >>
    >> Most Knit pickers should really get a life!

    >
    > So that makes you...the Fuzz Fuzz?!?


    I'd say more like confused. Nit is a synonym of head-louse, and
    nit-pickers have nothing to do with knitwear.
    --
    Regards
    Alex
    The From address above is a spam-trap.
    The Reply-To address is valid
     
  3. Bill Sornson

    Bill Sornson Guest

    Ken M wrote:

    > Sometimes people type to fast for their abilities.


    !

    > Sometimes it just
    > comes down to proof reading the post before posting. IMO.


    !

    Bill "!" S.
     
  4. Derailler - A device used to mace a (usually) runaway train to jump it's
    tracks

    Derailleur - A french word for a device fused to shift a (usually)
    bicycle chain from one cog/sprocket to another.

    - -
    Compliments of,
    Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman

    My web Site: http://geocities.com/czcorner

    To E-mail me: ChrisZCorner "at" webtv "dot" net
     
  5. Derailler - A device used to mace a (usually) runaway train to jump it's
    tracks

    Derailleur - A french word for a device used to shift a (usually)
    bicycle chain from one cog/sprocket to another.

    - -
    Compliments of,
    Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman

    My web Site: http://geocities.com/czcorner

    To E-mail me: ChrisZCorner "at" webtv "dot" net
     
  6. tomgaul

    tomgaul New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0
    The one that get's me is to, too or two.
    As in:
    There are too many to get two cookies. :D
     
  7. Ken M

    Ken M Guest

    Chris Z The Wheelman wrote:

    > Derailleur - A french word for a device fused to shift a (usually)
    > bicycle chain from one cog/sprocket to another.


    But thats is an easy mistake, besides it's French.

    Ken
    --
    Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of a bike ride. ~John F. Kennedy
     
  8. "Alex Potter (59)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > I'd say more like confused. Nit is a synonym of head-louse,


    O, geez. I REALLY hate to do this, but you're wrong.

    The "nit" is the EGG of the head-louse.

    I can't believe I did that...
     
  9. Paul Turner

    Paul Turner Guest

    Mark Hickey wrote:

    > It's vs its


    It could be worse. I saw its' -- I T S apostrophe -- used in a
    Wikipedia article the other day. Someone changed it and the author
    changed it back, insisting that it was right.

    --
    Paul Turner
     
  10. Bill Sornson

    Bill Sornson Guest

    Roger Houston wrote:
    > "Alex Potter (59)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> I'd say more like confused. Nit is a synonym of head-louse,

    >
    > O, geez. I REALLY hate to do this, but you're wrong.
    >
    > The "nit" is the EGG of the head-louse.
    >
    > I can't believe I did that...


    Gives new -- or at least /extra/ -- meaning to the term "egg head". (And of
    course, that was rather egg-headed about head eggs.)

    <eg> Ewww. <eg>

    Bill "assistant nit" S.
     
  11. Bill Sornson

    Bill Sornson Guest

    tomgaul wrote:

    > The one that get's me is to, too or two.


    "Get's"???

    Sigh.
     
  12. Alex Potter

    Alex Potter Guest

    Roger Houston wrote on Saturday 10 December 2005 23:21:

    >
    > "Alex Potter (59)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> I'd say more like confused. Nit is a synonym of head-louse,

    >
    > O, geez. I REALLY hate to do this, but you're wrong.
    >
    > The "nit" is the EGG of the head-louse.
    >
    > I can't believe I did that...


    teaching Granddad? :)
    --
    Regards
    Alex
    The From address above is a spam-trap.
    The Reply-To address is valid
     
  13. Bill Sornson wrote:
    > tomgaul wrote:
    >
    > > The one that get's me is to, too or two.

    >
    > "Get's"???
    >
    > Sigh.


    This opens a whole new world of opportunity for the apostrophe
    challenged!

    goe's

    hope's

    love's

    ride's

    drive's

    walk's

    and, finally:

    bicycle's
     
  14. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    On Fri, 09 Dec 2005 21:12:18 -0600, Patrick Lamb
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >OB bikes:
    >brake - break
    >e.g., the breaks on my bike aren't working.
    >(That should be a good thing, right?)


    Of coarse yore wright.

    Eye, four won, maid sum mistakes two butt ewe wood no it.
    --
    zk
     
  15. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    On 9 Dec 2005 18:53:18 -0800, "Colorado Bicycler" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Anyone else with some favorites?


    Bear naked.
    --
    zk
     
  16. Leo Lichtman

    Leo Lichtman Guest

    "Colorado Bicycler" wrote: This opens a whole new world of opportunity for
    the apostrophe challenged! (clip)
    >
    > goe's--This one's a definite reject.
    >
    > hope's--Hope's main benefit is that it makes the future brighter.
    >
    > love's--"Love's lavor lost."
    >
    > ride's--The ride's two main benefits were exercise and fresh air.
    >
    > drive's--The drive's lack of exercise and fresh air makes me want to
    > return to the bike.
    >
    > walk's--A walk's slowness is both good and bad.
    >
    > and, finally:
    >
    > bicycle's--The bicycle's headset seemed to have a bearing problem.
     
  17. American English is suffering from inflation. Many old words are not
    good enough or maybe people don't know which form to invoke for the
    meaning at hand, as we have seen from the offerings in this thread up
    to now. Learning top read and write is out of fashion with as much
    audio-video as we have at our fingertips. Writing the scripts
    requires far fewer people to spend less time than if we all had to
    learn the language.

    More insidious is the use of "impact" that which occurs when objects
    collide. Because most people have no idea when to use "who" and
    "whom" (it is for them for 'who' the bell tolls) and whether this will
    have an affect or effect on their lives. The words effect and affect
    are no longer found in the media or elsewhere in public use. They
    have been replaced by "impact".

    In the traffic reports, roads are not blocked, "roadways" are blocked.
    We don't have rain but "rainstorms", we don't ride bicycle by pushing
    on cranks, we use "crankarms", cars don't crash into the median but do
    so into "the center divide." Who comes up with this jargon?

    When it comes to metaphors it gets worse. Among these, I recall when
    uncle Remus used a carrot dangling from the end of a stick to
    encourage his donkey to get underway as he sat on the bench in the
    buckboard.

    Today, in an automotive world, no one seems to visualize that ploy and
    the metaphor that arose from it. Even though it is a logical and
    reasonable visualization, the common use today places the carrot in
    one hand and a stick in the other, never thinking how that
    configuration might induce a draft animal to pull a wagon. Besides,
    the image is so crude.

    http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/41/messages/840.html

    I guess punishment by beating with a stick is more convincing in
    today's mentality than the lure of reward. I really meant "mindset."

    Jobst Brandt
     
  18. On that note, a few words in English could be banned from ones
    vocabulary because they emasculate words and concepts when they are
    used. Worst of these is "very" which maims adverbs or adjectives it
    is meant to enhance. There are better words if a superlative is
    needed. When running completely out of modifiers, "very very" comes
    out to kill all.

    Yu' know!

    Another is "hopefully" because it weakens any position the author
    takes by not expressing an opinion such as "I hope you will succeed"
    but rather "you will succeed, hopefully." That way no one can accuse
    the author of having taken a stand. "Hope" was left dangling on a
    thread in the middle of the room like an orphaned mobile. Beyond
    that, "hopefully" is usually tacked on at the end of the sentence as
    so much gratuitous punctuation. Amen.

    Jobst Brandt
     
  19. Patrick Lamb wrote:
    > OB bikes:
    > brake - break
    > e.g., the breaks on my bike aren't working.
    > (That should be a good thing, right?)


    I guess what you want to know is:

    Did my breaks brake?
     
  20. Marz

    Marz Guest

    Colorado Bicycler wrote:
    > Patrick Lamb wrote:
    > > OB bikes:
    > > brake - break
    > > e.g., the breaks on my bike aren't working.
    > > (That should be a good thing, right?)

    >
    > I guess what you want to know is:
    >
    > Did my breaks brake?



    My my, so witty, I bet your friends think you're quite the wag.



    Laters,

    Marz
     
Loading...
Loading...