The Psychology of Cycling

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Chain male, Apr 7, 2003.

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  1. Chain male

    Chain male New Member

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    I am about to conduct some research into the motives behind bicycle use. I am in need of your views and opinions on why people - or more specifically, you - cycle. If you feel like posting your opinion and giving me a hand, consider the following:

    1) Why, on the occassions that you cycyle, do you choose to cycle rather than use other forms of transport?

    2) How does cycling make you feel and in which situations?

    3) How do you think the general public view cyclists?

    4) Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge it, and
    its owner, in the same way that car drivers do?

    5) What do you think are the main issues surrounding bicycle use?

    6) Anything I've missed out?

    I am hoping to get the research published. So any views and opinions you post will hopefully go some way to aiding cyclists being catered for more effectively.

    Many thanks
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, usenet- [email protected] says...
    > I am about to conduct some research into the motives behind bicycle use. I am in need of your
    > views and opinions on why people - or more specifically, you - cycle. If you feel like posting
    > your opinion and giving me a hand, consider the following:
    [...]
    > I am hoping to get the research published. So any views and opinions you post will hopefully go
    > some way to aiding cyclists being catered for more effectively.

    Could you at least tell us who you are and the nature of this very open- ended sounding research.
    What are cycycles?

    Colin
     
  3. In message <[email protected]>, Chain male <[email protected]> writes
    >I am about to conduct some research into the motives behind bicycle use. I am in need of your views
    >and opinions on why people - or more specifically, you - cycle. If you feel like posting your
    >opinion and giving me a hand, consider the following:
    >

    snip

    >
    >
    >
    >--
    >Chain Male
    >
    >>--------------------------<
    >Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com

    I hope you don't mind a little advice from a market researcher but it's usually the case that you
    maximise the response and get more relevant information if you provide a bit more information about
    your motives and step out of anonymity. Who are you and what exactly do you intend doing with your
    findings? Is it possible to submit responses confidentially, by email?
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  4. Saint

    Saint Guest

    <snip>

    As a Psychologist myself I'd be very interested to hear the hypotheses for your research. However
    I'm intrigued as to how you plan to collect data from a series of non-standard responses - is this
    qualitative research?

    Saint
     
  5. Tim Dunne

    Tim Dunne Guest

    "Chain male" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > 1) Why, on the occassions that you cycyle, do you choose to cycle rather than use other forms of
    > transport?

    It tastes better.

    > 2) How does cycling make you feel and in which situations?

    Like a ferret. Between two slices of ciabatta, glazed with olive oil.

    > 3) How do you think the general public view cyclists?

    With binoculars from hiiiigh hilltops. They think it's safer that way. But we know better...

    > 4) Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge it, and its owner, in the same way
    > that car drivers do?

    I wasn't awre that motorists saw anything beyond their bonnet, penis or mobile phone. Aren't they
    too busy looking for speed cameras anyway?

    > 5) What do you think are the main issues surrounding bicycle use?

    The continuing lack of positive cycling imagery in nature documentaries, reality TV and commercials
    for pensions.

    > 6) Anything I've missed out?

    Yes. Why are you asking and who are you?

    > I am hoping to get the research published. So any views and opinions you post will hopefully go
    > some way to aiding cyclists being catered for more effectively.

    Does that mean we'll get paid for doing your homework?

    > Many thanks

    Don't mention it. They're either gonna arrest me or sack you.

    Tim

    --
    Sent from Birmingham, UK... Check out www.nervouscyclist.org 'When you're under the USA, someone
    rings a bell and it's all over'
    - David Bowie, 'Day In, Day Out'. My 'reply to' address is valid, mail to the posting
    address is dumped
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    In a brief moment of lucidity Chain male scribbled:

    > I am about to conduct some research into the motives behind bicycle use. I am in need of your
    > views and opinions on why people - or more specifically, you - cycle. If you feel like posting
    > your opinion and giving me a hand, consider the following:
    >
    > 1) Why, on the occassions that you cycyle, do you choose to cycle rather than use other forms of
    > transport?

    Dunno. Nowadays on a whim, or just when I feel like it.

    > 2) How does cycling make you feel and in which situations?

    Great, nackered, bruised and bleeding, exhilarated, happy. Depends on which bike and where I go ..

    > 3) How do you think the general public view cyclists?

    Often with a gormless grin apparently thinking ' which way is this berk going, which way do I need
    to go to hit him' ..

    > 4) Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge it, and its owner, in the same way
    > that car drivers do?

    Yup, and nope .. ;) Some do, some don't.

    > 5) What do you think are the main issues surrounding bicycle use?

    For me it's can I be bothered, how big is that friggin' hill .. ;)

    > 6) Anything I've missed out?

    ooooh lots ..

    > I am hoping to get the research published. So any views and opinions you post will hopefully go
    > some way to aiding cyclists being catered for more effectively.

    Doesn't seem to be any kind of focussed research here. More a mismatch of badly spelled and
    grammatically incorrect sentences and phrases, which serve no apparent purpose. I'd suggest you look
    more closely at what you want, and try to phrase your questions in such a way that meaningful
    answers may be given.

    I mean, " ..Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge
    it.." very professional I'm sure NOT.

    --

    Completed 1581 Seti work units in 12041 hours http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/
     
  7. Mike Causer

    Mike Causer Guest

    On Tue, 08 Apr 2003 02:00:27 +0950, Chain male wrote:

    > 1) Why, on the occassions that you cycyle, do you choose to cycle rather than use other forms of
    > transport?

    Life is so sanitised and boring nowadays that I need the adrenalin rush from sharing traffic-calming
    with white vans, and the High St with U-turning taxis.

    > 2) How does cycling make you feel and in which situations?

    In need of a pee on any road with no hedges. In need of a drink on any road with no pub.

    > 3) How do you think the general public view cyclists?

    They don't, cyclists are invisible to the general public.

    > 4) Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge it, and its owner, in the same way
    > that car drivers do?

    Bicycles do not have BMW badges, nor newness-revealing number plates, so the answer is no. However,
    cyclists have incredible awareness of wheel size, so the difference between between 700 and 26" is
    immediately recognised. OTOH, a bi/tricycle with 17" wheels will generate either puzzlement or awe
    at the sums of money involved.

    > 5) What do you think are the main issues surrounding bicycle use?

    Are the tyres at the right pressure; do the lights have reasonably fresh batteries; have I set the
    computer to the wheel size for the bicycle of the day.

    > 6) Anything I've missed out?

    I have found a wonderful solution for this problem, but this margin has insufficient space.

    Mike
     
  8. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Chain male <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I am hoping to get the research published.

    I can see this becoming the lead paper in the Journal of Irreproducible Results

    Tony

    -- http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to
    adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  9. Me

    Me Guest

    1) Why, on the occassions that you cycyle, do you choose to cycle rather
    > than use other forms of transport?

    Cycling regularly on the road to me is great fun - puts the sport back in transport. Theres nothing
    better than weaving through and flying past traffic on my journey. My daily commute takes me over an
    M6 junction, which occasionally gets closed - its feels great flying past the huge queues of traffic
    that stretch from Wolverhampton town centre all the way through Walsall.

    I'm quite fond getting in tight behind an HGV for a bit of 40mph slip streaming - and try to do so
    on every journey. Each journey has its own "mini drama". And it makes a change when my girlfriend
    comments on my expanding legs instead of expanding gut - in fact, I haven't used my car once since
    giving up smoking 11 weeks ago - and I feel great.

    > 2) How does cycling make you feel and in which situations?

    Exhileration with speed Pain and embarrasment when I fell off in Sutton Park on Saturday
    Self-satisfaction knowing that I'm not a total couch-potato Anger when other people put your
    well-being at risk Possibly gives you most emotions - although I don't think I've ever felt love for
    a bike, at least not a mechanical one ;-D

    > 3) How do you think the general public view cyclists?

    Generally as a bit of an inconvenience - especially when a vehicle has to overtake you a few times
    because I keep catching them up and undertaking them in traffic. Its amazing how impatient some
    people can be. Other may give you respect for dumping your car. Who knows.

    > 4) Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge it, and its owner, in the same way
    > that car drivers do?

    Possibly. I'll always have a look at the next bike on the rack when I lock mine up. And I always
    take pleasure in overtaking cyclists who seem to take it a bit seriously, with the fetching team
    sponsored lycra gear on etc - especially considering I'm usually about as aerodynamic as a sail.

    ) Anything I've missed out?
    >
    > I am hoping to get the research published. So any views and opinions you post will hopefully go
    > some way to aiding cyclists being catered for more effectively.
    >
    > Many thanks
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Chain Male
    >
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  10. "Chain male" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > 1) Why, on the occassions that you cycyle, do you choose to cycle
    rather
    > than use other forms of transport?

    In almost all cases, recreation.

    > 2) How does cycling make you feel and in which situations?

    Pretty good. I try not to tire myself out too much.

    > 3) How do you think the general public view cyclists?

    I don't think they think enough about them to even form opinions.

    > 4) Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge it, and
    its
    > owner, in the same way that car drivers do?

    Probably not.

    > 5) What do you think are the main issues surrounding bicycle use?

    Issues, as in controversies? As in judgements? Too broad a question.

    > 6) Anything I've missed out?

    Probably near everything!

    > I am hoping to get the research published. So any views and opinions
    you
    > post will hopefully go some way to aiding cyclists being catered for more effectively.

    Sorry, but this query is so vague & broad it looks more like trolling than even a beginning
    of research!

    Robert
     
  11. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Chain male" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am about to conduct some research into the motives behind bicycle use. I am in need of your
    > views and opinions on why people - or more specifically, you - cycle. If you feel like posting
    > your opinion and giving me a hand, consider the following:
    >
    > 1) Why, on the occassions that you cycyle, do you choose to cycle rather than use other forms of
    > transport?

    Why not?

    >
    > 2) How does cycling make you feel and in which situations?

    Grrrrrreat -- unless I fall off.

    >
    > 3) How do you think the general public view cyclists?

    Nutters
    >
    > 4) Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge it, and its owner, in the same way
    > that car drivers do?

    FFS -- check out the thighs on that. No, I won't try to overtake.

    >
    > 5) What do you think are the main issues surrounding bicycle use?

    Helmets & cyclepaths are always good for a long thread. Dangers of bib-shorts is long running.
    Concern over celeste tutu wearing lassies.

    >
    > 6) Anything I've missed out?

    No.

    >
    > I am hoping to get the research published.

    The Beano would be good.

    > So any views and opinions you post will hopefully go some way to aiding cyclists being catered for
    > more effectively.
    >
    > Many thanks
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Chain Male
    >
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  12. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Chain male <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I am about to conduct some research into the motives behind bicycle use. I am in need of your
    > views and opinions on why people - or more specifically, you - cycle. If you feel like posting
    > your opinion and giving me a hand, consider the following:

    You're either a very skilled troll or an utterly clueless student.

    > 4) Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge it, and its owner, in the same way
    > that car drivers do?

    On second thoughts this wonderful question gives you away. I like this question very much, but even
    by today's standards no genuine student could have produced it.

    Nice one, :)

    --
    Dave...
     
  13. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Me" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > 1) Why, on the occassions that you cycyle, do you choose to cycle rather
    > > than use other forms of transport?
    >
    > Cycling regularly on the road to me is great fun - puts the sport back in transport. Theres
    > nothing better than weaving through and flying past traffic on my journey. My daily commute takes
    > me over an M6 junction,
    which
    > occasionally gets closed - its feels great flying past the huge queues of traffic that stretch
    > from Wolverhampton town centre all the way through Walsall. <snip>
    ...oh, how much fun is that junction (M6,J10) when it's in full swing ?. I long to get the relevant
    planner on a bike and ask them to make one full circuit of the island, preferably without a h*lm*t
    and possibly in b*bsh*rts (..and maybe a tutu, who knows?). I am sure it would rapidly result in a
    bit of re-structuring of the cager oriented death race. You're right about the pleasure to be had
    when congestion rules and nothings moving though... ;-) cheers, Dave.
     
  14. Chain male

    Chain male New Member

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    O.K. - Thank you all for your valid criticims. Some of the info you wanted:-

    I am currently in the second half of my Msc in Environmental Psychology at Guildford University. I love cycling, both as a pass time and as a means for transport. I have never used a forum before, which may go some way to explaining my lapse in etiquette.

    The research is qualitative in nature and uses a multiple sort procedure which enables the exploration of the way people structure their perceptions around a particular subject. There are usually 15-20 cards, each of which contains an element or facet of the subject area in question. The respondent sorts these cards into mutually exclusive groups to demonstrate their perceptions of the area in question. The questions I posted were not so much for data gathering, more for formulating the elements or facets to go on the cards. As such they were supposed to be open ended to facilitate conversation and opinion. For those of you who want to know more on the theory and method there is a more detailed explanation below. For those of you who weren't bothered anyway sorry for the over-kill!

    THEORY OVERVIEW
    It is now accepted that mediators of car use involve more than just rationalised, functional motives and include both symbolic and affective motives such as feelings of control, independence, power and prestige. (Jensen, 1999; Steg, Vlek & Slotgraaf, 2001; Stradling, Meadows & Beatty, 2001; Wright & Egan, 2000). However, similar advances in understanding have not been made with “greener” alternatives to the car such as the bicycle. In contrast to cars, the current understanding of people’s choice of bicycles as a means of transport is limited to the practical issues involved (e.g. facilities, convenience and personal cost), and attitudes towards cycling. Such explanations emphasise the practical and rational motives of cycle use and assume the goal directed nature of transport mode choice. Although this approach has been fruitful and has gleaned many ways that the extent of cycle use can be increased by the provision of facilities, removal of psychological barriers and projects for attitude change, it says little about the social and psychological motives of cycle use.

    In their study into the relative importance of different types of motives in car use, Steg, Vlek & Slotgraaf (2001) draw attention to the distinction between instrumental-reasoned and the symbolic-affective motives. Instrumental-reasoned motives refer to the practical or functional qualities of the car, and how people reason that those qualities are adept at fulfilling their transport needs. Symbolic-affective motives refer to the aspects of the car that fulfil social and psychological functions. The symbolic aspect of their symbolic-affective dimension reflects the expressive and comparative nature of attached meanings and places them firmly in a social context. For example, different styles and classes of cars facilitate social comparison and expression of identity. The affective aspect refers to the emotions that can be evoked through the experience of travelling in a car. Examples of this may be emotions associated with driving in a particular manner, or feelings of independence and freedom elicited by the ability to go wherever and whenever you want.

    There are a number of factors involved in bicycle use that suggests that symbolic motives may also play a part for individuals who cycle. For example, bicycles tend to be privately owned; are subject to personal control; and are available in a number of different styles. It therefore seems reasonable to speculate that symbolic motives may act in a similar fashion in cycling as they do in driving. The occurrence of fads and fashions in the bicycle industry also suggests an opportunity for social comparison in terms of the “the latest thing”. Each decade over the past thirty years has had at least one fashionable bike type. The “Chopper” in the Seventies; The Grifter, BMX, and foldable bike in the Eighties; and the various types of Mountain Bikes and “Hybrids” in the Nineties and early 2000’s. The development in the design of bicycle components such as suspension, gears, and disk brakes is faster paced than these broader changes in fads and may also provide a basis for social comparison for those who are more dedicated cyclists.

    The fact that bicycles are an environmentally friendly form of transport may also impact on the social identity of cyclists through the symbolic meanings attributed to their transport mode of choice. In addition, individuals who cycle may also see themselves, or be seen, as ‘fitness fanatics’ or ‘sporty’ because they are propelled under their own power. Again, these examples are comparable to research of the motives of car use that suggest that factors such as prestige are important.

    There is also reason to believe that affect may play a part in the motives behind cycling. An example of a possible affective motive of cycle use comes from Jackson and Ruehr (1998) who conducted a survey to ascertain bicycle use and attitudes towards cycling in San Dieago County, U.S.A. They found that 58% of the respondents, who said they cycled, did so for recreation or exercise, but only 15% cycled for transportation purposes. This suggests that cycling is intrinsically rewarding as well as performing a practical role. It is probable that the incidence of recreational cycling is to some extent dependent upon facilities provided and the perceived environmental quality of the cyclists’ surroundings. However, many studies have found that exercise is associated with the mood enhancement in non-clinical as well as clinical groups (Litchman & Poser, 1981; Yeung and Hemsley, 1999), even after a short duration (Yeung, 1996) suggesting that the benefits of cycling can also be experienced independently of the environment.

    Despite the above observations and research findings, it is not clear to what extent these concerns play a role in the motives behind bicycle use. There is clearly a need to understand phenomena in bicycle use that not only account of its practical roles, but also the associated motives which may be analogous to Steg et al’s symbolic-affective motives. Due to the scarcity of research exploring the motives of people who cycle, and the occurrence of phenomena associated with cycling that suggest a broader understanding is required, it is the main aim of the proposed research to explore the motives behind bicycle use. Therefore, the central questions in the proposed research are: 1) Are cyclists motivated by symbolic-affective meanings in addition to instrumental-reasoned motives? 2) What is the relative importance of instrumental-reasoned and symbolic-affective motives behind bicycle use?

    With respect to the project remit, it is also important to identify any disparities in the way cyclists and car drivers think about the transport modes in question. This will further aid interventions designed to remove real or perceived barriers to bicycle use and inform car reduction campaigns. Therefore it is necessary to ask: 1) What are the motives behind car use for this comparative sample? 2) What is the relative importance of instrumental-reasoned and symbolic-affective motives behind car use?

    It is probable that there is a considerable overlap in the awareness of motives for using particular transport modes. For example, it is widely accepted that British culture is, in many respects, dominated by the car (Root; 1996). It is not necessary to be a car driver to have a detailed knowledge about the motives of car use, one just has to watch a car advertisement to observe these. Furthermore, few cyclists have not travelled in a car as a passenger and experienced, at least vicariously, the instrumental-reasoned and symbolic-affective motives behind car use. The bicycle, although rarely a passenger barer and generally advertised in specialist magazines, also has meanings attributed to it that can be traced back to vicarious experience or public discourse. An example of this ‘common knowledge’ might be that bicycles are an environmentally friendly or health promoting form of transport.

    Despite these likely over-laps between cyclists and drivers in their perceptions of each group’s transport modes, the case still remains that there should be an observable difference between the two groups. In short, if the transport mode of choice does reflect the ability of different aspects of vehicle uses and its attributes to fulfil personal needs and desires, a difference between car drivers and cyclists’ perceptions of the transport modes in question should exist. For example, Fuji, Garling & Kitamura (2001) found that drivers’ perceptions about public transport became more accurate after a freeway closure forced them to commute by public transport. This demonstrates the importance that experience plays in the perception of a transport mode. Further, research into the reduction of car use suggests that cognitive dissonance (Festinger, 1957; Cooper & Fazio, 1984) may play a role in the number or nature of motives identified by cyclists and drivers for the two transport mode types. For example, Steg and Vlek (1996) found that when specific attitudes towards car use were in question with respondents who were previously found to be environmentally aware, participants’ became less cognisant of the associated problems of car use. This suggests that cyclists may identify more negative consequences associated with car use than car drivers.
    Therefore second aim of the proposed research is to investigate how cyclists and car drivers think about each others’ mode of transport as well as their own. There are two research questions concerning this aim: 1) How do drivers’ and cyclists’ perceptions differ on cars? 2) How do drivers’ and cyclists’ perceptions differ on bicycles?

    METHODOLOGY

    PROCEDURE
    Previous research suggests that transport mode users tend to rationalise and justify their travel behaviour. Steg et al. (2001) argue that instrumental-reasoned motives are more readily offered by respondents than symbolic-affective motives in self-report situations for this very reason. Steg et al. found that more intuitive data gathering methods do not cause respondents to rationalise their behaviour and elicit symbolic-affective motives as well as instrumental-reasoned motives. The multiple sort procedure (MSP) has therefore been chosen as it is entails an intuitive task and therefore provides the best opportunity for exploring all the motive types in transport mode use.

    Participants will be presented with fifteen to twenty picture cards displaying elements relating to the use of the transport mode in question. A separate set will be used for bicycles and cars to facilitate the coherence of what is being represented and distinction between the two transport modes when required. Each participant will be asked to conduct two sets of sorts; one set on the mode of transport that they use, and one set on the mode of transport that they do not. The order of sort sets will be counterbalanced within each group to avoid fatigue and practice effects. Participants will be asked to conduct free sorts on what they think about cars/bicycles until sorts are exhausted. Structured sorts will also be used in order to cyclists and drivers perceptions on the motives of car and bicycle use

    MATERIALS
    The elements represented upon the cards for both bicycles and cars will be drawn from previous research on the motives of car use on the practical functions of, and attitudes towards each transport mode. Public discourse from Internet sites tailored for cyclists will also be used to select elements with the aim of compensating for the lack of previous research on the motives of bicycle use. This literature search method of element selection was chosen as interview or questionnaire techniques have been found by Steg et al. to be biased towards eliciting rationalised responses and therefore provide mainly instrumental motives. In order to select card elements from this literature search, Steg et al’s (2001) study using a similar sort technique for the research of motives behind car use will be used as a guide for compatibility. Where possible, bicycle sort cards and car sort cards will be as comparable as possible in subject matter. For example, where previous findings from research into motives behind car use suggest that aggressive cyclists are an important factor, aggressive drivers would be used for cyclists. As the respondents perceptions of the cards themselves are as important as the way they sort them, it is not necessary (or indeed possible) to have strictly comparable card items for each sort set. The pictorial representations on the cards will be computer generated silhouette pictures, similar in style to road signs, unless manipulation is required to illustrate certain elements (see appendix one). This is done to avoid any confounding from preference of colour, or background detail that may be found in photographs. The cards will be validated for coherence of meaning at local bicycle and car retailers.
     
  15. Jo Hardman

    Jo Hardman Guest

    "Chain male" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am about to conduct some research into the motives behind bicycle use. I am in need of your
    > views and opinions on why people - or more specifically, you - cycle. If you feel like posting
    > your opinion and giving me a hand, consider the following:
    >
    > 1) Why, on the occassions that you cycyle, do you choose to cycle rather than use other forms of
    > transport?

    > Don't drive, so other choices are:
    a) Walking - fine, but slow and shorter range.
    b)Public transport - unreliable, inconvenient, slow, crowded, smelly. All of these apply
    particularly on shorter distance trips. Has to be used at times. Cycling is pleasant, reasonably
    quick, particularly in town traffic conditions, environmentally friendly.
    > 2) How does cycling make you feel and in which situations?

    Can be frustrating in traffic when car drivers choose not to see you on the road, otherwise the
    excercise, combined with not being separated from your environment by a steel box is quite
    exillarating.
    >
    > 3) How do you think the general public view cyclists?
    >
    Either as Lycra Louts or complete nutters. (Due to age/gender/size I think I come in to the latter
    category!)
    > 4) Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge it, and its owner, in the same way
    > that car drivers do? Yes. I am afraid I do make judgements on whether somebody is a 'serious
    cyclist' or not. That is being honest, I can't say I am proud of the fact - after all shouldn't we
    all be pleased that people are out on any bike?> 5) What do you think are the main issues
    surrounding bicycle use?
    >
    > 6) Anything I've missed out? Lots. Don't you need to know who is cycling (in terms of
    > age/gender/social
    class etc) in order to make sense of your results?
    > I am hoping to get the research published. So any views and opinions you post will hopefully go
    > some way to aiding cyclists being catered for more effectively.
    >
    > Many thanks
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Chain Male
    >
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  16. Chain male wrote:

    > O.K. - Thank you all for your valid criticims. Some of the info you wanted:-
    >
    > I am currently in the second half of my Msc in Environmental Psychology at Guildford University. I
    > love cycling, both as a pass time and as a means for transport. I have never used a forum before,
    > which may go some way to explaining my lapse in etiquette.
    [...]
    > --
    > Chain Male

    So your name really is Chain Male then?

    Colin
     
  17. Chain male

    Chain male New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
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    0
    [> 6) Anything I've missed out? Lots. Don't you need to know who is cycling (in terms of
    > age/gender/social
    class etc) in order to make sense of your results?
    >
    Thanks for replying,

    Your right, I would. Most of the people I will be asking to take part in the research will be of a particular age and user-type. However, these user-types probably over lap - eg commuters who also do road racing in their free time. The research I will be doing enables me to explore these details in a focused way, rather than just saying that there were more users of a particular age/gender/social class in a particular group. So its more about experience than prediction - much more useful for stimulating further research in a fresh area.

    Thanks again for your input.
     
  18. Chain male

    Chain male New Member

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    Hi Colin,

    No my real name is Simon - pleased to meet you!
     
  19. Russell

    Russell Guest

    Chain male <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am about to conduct some research into the motives behind bicycle use. I am in need of your
    > views and opinions on why people - or more specifically, you - cycle. If you feel like posting
    > your opinion and giving me a hand, consider the following:
    >
    > 1) Why, on the occassions that you cycyle, do you choose to cycle rather than use other forms of
    > transport?

    Why does an Eagle fly?

    >
    > 2) How does cycling make you feel and in which situations?

    but forgot to get off my bike.

    >
    > 3) How do you think the general public view cyclists?

    High visibility bananas on wheels.

    >
    > 4) Do think that cycylists look at other bicycles and judge it, and its owner, in the same way
    > that car drivers do?

    People who only drive cars have only have reptillian brains. Cyclists have brains more advanced than
    any other creature in God's creation. You cannot draw any parallels between them.

    >
    > 5) What do you think are the main issues surrounding bicycle use?

    How many banana's do I have left in my jacket?

    >
    > 6) Anything I've missed out?

    No that's everything. Well done!!

    >
    > I am hoping to get the research published. So any views and opinions you post will hopefully go
    > some way to aiding cyclists being catered for more effectively.
    >
    > Many thanks
     
  20. Chain male

    Chain male New Member

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    [> 6) Anything I've missed out? Lots. Don't you need to know who is cycling (in terms of
    > age/gender/social
    class etc) in order to make sense of your results?
    >
    Thanks for replying,

    Your right, I would. Most of the people I will be asking to take part in the research will be of a particular age and user-type. However, these user-types probably over lap - eg commuters who also do road racing in their free time. The research I will be doing enables me to explore these details in a focused way, rather than just saying that there were more users of a particular age/gender/social class in a particular group. So its more about experience than prediction - much more useful for stimulating further research in a fresh area.

    Thanks again for your input.
     
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