The "Seabiscuit" of Pro Cycling

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Kbh, Jul 22, 2003.

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  1. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    ...has to be Eddie Merckx. As someone wrote in an earlier post, he

    1) won all three jerseys at the TDF
    2) won a bunch of classics
    3) won like 50% of the races he enters
    4) raced from January to October
    5) held the hour record

    After reading the book (HIGHLY recommended even for non horse-racing fans), and getting wrapped up
    in the tour, this analogy came to me. Most of todays top horses, and even those coddled "East Coast"
    horses back in Seabiscuit's day (i.e. War Admiral), barely raced and prepared for nothing more than
    the triple crown - somewhat akin to Lance and the TDF. On the other hand, Eddie and his equine
    predecessor Seabiscuit, raced all the time, without much rest, and had very long, overwhelmingly
    successful careers. In fact don't they both hold the all time wins record?

    Maybe this is a stupid analogy. Did Eddie ever come back from an injury?

    Kyle
     
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  2. Daniel Lieb

    Daniel Lieb Guest

    > >Most of todays
    > top horses, and even those coddled "East Coast" horses back in Seabiscuit's day (i.e. War
    > Admiral), barely raced and prepared for nothing more than the triple crown - somewhat akin to
    > Lance and the TDF.

    Not entirely true about race horses. You can only run in the triple crown races when you are a three
    year old. (Every horses birthday is Jan 1.) There are a series of major stakes races that many
    horses race in before the Derby, the Preakness in two weeks after the Derby and the Belmont is three
    weeks after the Preakness. Granted they aren't racing every weekend.

    Dan
     
  3. KBH wrote:
    > ...has to be Eddie Merckx. As someone wrote in an earlier post, he
    >
    > 1) won all three jerseys at the TDF
    > 2) won a bunch of classics
    > 3) won like 50% of the races he enters
    > 4) raced from January to October
    > 3) held the hour record
    >
    > After reading the book (HIGHLY recommended even for non horse-racing fans), and getting wrapped up
    > in the tour, this analogy came to me. Most of todays top horses, and even those coddled "East
    > Coast" horses back in Seabiscuit's day (i.e. War Admiral), barely raced and prepared for nothing
    > more than the triple crown - somewhat akin to Lance and the TDF. On the other hand, Eddie and his
    > equine predecessor Seabiscuit, raced all the time, without much rest, and had very long,
    > overwhelmingly successful careers. In fact don't they both hold the all time wins record?
    >
    > Maybe this is a stupid analogy. Did Eddie ever come back from an injury?
    >
    > Kyle

    Yes. Perhaps someone can fill in the details. He was assaulted by a spectator during a race.
    I believe he suffered injuries to his liver. I've heard that he never felt he was the same
    on a bike afterwards.

    Steve
     
  4. David Ryan

    David Ryan Guest

    Steven Bornfeld wrote:
    >
    > KBH wrote:
    > > ...has to be Eddie Merckx. As someone wrote in an earlier post, he
    > >
    > > 1) won all three jerseys at the TDF
    > > 2) won a bunch of classics
    > > 3) won like 50% of the races he enters
    > > 4) raced from January to October
    > > 3) held the hour record
    > >
    > > After reading the book (HIGHLY recommended even for non horse-racing fans), and getting wrapped
    > > up in the tour, this analogy came to me. Most of todays top horses, and even those coddled "East
    > > Coast" horses back in Seabiscuit's day (i.e. War Admiral), barely raced and prepared for nothing
    > > more than the triple crown - somewhat akin to Lance and the TDF. On the other hand, Eddie and
    > > his equine predecessor Seabiscuit, raced all the time, without much rest, and had very long,
    > > overwhelmingly successful careers. In fact don't they both hold the all time wins record?
    > >
    > > Maybe this is a stupid analogy. Did Eddie ever come back from an injury?
    > >
    > > Kyle
    >
    > Yes. Perhaps someone can fill in the details. He was assaulted by a spectator during a
    > race. I believe he suffered injuries to his liver. I've heard that he never felt he was
    > the same on a bike afterwards.
    >
    > Steve

    That was toward the end.

    More to the point, most of his career came after a near-fatal motorpacing accident just after the
    1969 Tour in which the motorcyclist was killed. Merckx spent months recuperating and suffered from
    permanent back pain.
     
  5. Steven Bornfeld <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > KBH wrote:
    > > ...has to be Eddie Merckx. As someone wrote in an earlier post, he
    > >
    > > 1) won all three jerseys at the TDF
    > > 2) won a bunch of classics
    > > 3) won like 50% of the races he enters
    > > 4) raced from January to October
    > > 3) held the hour record
    > >
    > > After reading the book (HIGHLY recommended even for non horse-racing fans), and getting wrapped
    > > up in the tour, this analogy came to me. Most of todays top horses, and even those coddled "East
    > > Coast" horses back in Seabiscuit's day (i.e. War Admiral), barely raced and prepared for nothing
    > > more than the triple crown - somewhat akin to Lance and the TDF. On the other hand, Eddie and
    > > his equine predecessor Seabiscuit, raced all the time, without much rest, and had very long,
    > > overwhelmingly successful careers. In fact don't they both hold the all time wins record?
    > >
    > > Maybe this is a stupid analogy. Did Eddie ever come back from an injury?
    > >
    > > Kyle
    >
    > Yes. Perhaps someone can fill in the details. He was assaulted by a spectator during a race.
    > I believe he suffered injuries to his liver. I've heard that he never felt he was the same
    > on a bike afterwards.
    >
    > Steve
    >
    > >
    > >

    It was not just any race: it was the 1975 TdF! Some crazed fan attacked Merckx with a rabbit
    punch in the back, while he was on a
    climb. I believe that the spectator was French, and possibly motivated by a desire to prevent Merckx
    from gaining his 6th TdF title, which would set a record, thereby eclipsing the achievement
    of the French rider, Jacques Anquetil, who at that time was the only other rider to record 5
    TdF victories. Instead on Merckx having a crack at his 6th title, he came in 2nd, behing the
    French rider B. Thevanet. Merckx only raced one more year in the TdF, finishing in 6th place.

    Greg Lemond augered in the era of greater specialization. I do think that armstrong would be
    ranked higher as an All-Time cyclist, if he were to get a win or two each in the other major
    Classic tours, the Giro d' Italia, and La Vuelta de Espania (Tours of Italy and Spain)

    I do think that it is still possible to win both the TdF and the Vuelta. However, Lance is
    singularly focused on winning the TdF each year. Maybe he race in the Vuelta in 2004, before he
    retires? Well, probably not.

    What was inpressive about Merckx is that he sought to dominate the TdFs, not merely win the
    Yellow Jersey. So, he would win 6-8 stages--some in the mountains, some in Time trials, some in
    flat stages. He strived to win the King of the Mountain title, and the Points (sprint) title.

    Armstrong probably could have won the KoM competition 2 or 3
    years ago, but it is likely that the thought never crossed his mind.

    Cyclists today can scarcely imagine racing for maximum result, as Merckx did
     
  6. Kbh

    Kbh Guest

    "Daniel Lieb" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > >Most of todays
    > > top horses, and even those coddled "East Coast" horses back in
    Seabiscuit's
    > > day (i.e. War Admiral), barely raced and prepared for nothing more than
    the
    > > triple crown - somewhat akin to Lance and the TDF.
    >
    > Not entirely true about race horses. You can only run in the triple crown
    races
    > when you are a three year old. (Every horses birthday is Jan 1.) There
    are a
    > series of major stakes races that many horses race in before the Derby,
    the
    > Preakness in two weeks after the Derby and the Belmont is three weeks
    after the
    > Preakness. Granted they aren't racing every weekend.
    >
    > Dan

    Good point. OK, maybe not the best analogy.
     
  7. Carl Sundquist

    Carl Sundquist New Member

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  8. MNJRC_Berko

    MNJRC_Berko New Member

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    Hmmm...but for Eddie Merckx to be like Seabiscuit, wouldn't he have to have started off as a long shot? AS far as I know he didn't have any of the problems that Seabiscuit did getting started off.

    But, prove me wrong, because my knowledge of Merckx is very limited.
     
  9. "Carl Sundquist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Originally posted by Isidor Gunsberg
    >
    > Greg Lemond augered in the era of greater specialization. I do think that armstrong would be
    > ranked higher as an All-Time cyclist, if he were to get a win or two each in the other major
    > Classic tours, the Giro d' Italia, and La Vuelta de Espania (Tours of Italy and Spain)
    >
    >
    > Mr. Word Butcher,
    >
    > Greg Lemond USHERED in the era, not augered in. He is not an airplane.

    lol.

    BTW, Greg Lemond augered in the era of clipless pedals (the original LOOKS). That makes him greater
    than Eddy Merckx.
     
  10. Jay Hill

    Jay Hill Guest

    Carl Sundquist wrote:
    > Originally posted by Isidor Gunsberg
    >
    > Greg Lemond augered in the era of greater specialization. I do

    > Greg Lemond USHERED in the era, not augered in. He is not an airplane.
    >
    Isidor was aiming at "augured."
     
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