The Spokinator

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Babbar, Aug 11, 2003.

  1. Babbar

    Babbar New Member

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    I am 6'3", 240 lbs and have a Trek Navigator 300 that I ride 200+miles per week.

    Last January, I tacoe'd the stock, 36 spoke rear wheel. I had been riding on it for about 7 months. Because I didn't want to wait for an order, I took what they had on hand, a 32 spoke wheel.

    Everything was fine until July 31, when I broke six spokes. Then, a few days later, another one went. Yesterday, I took out two more. Today, less than 1 mile into my daily ride, another one went.

    Now, the wheels on the Trek are not the greatest, but should I be breaking so many spokes? After the six went, I had the wheel trued. Then, yesterday, I had it trued again, just in case. It wasn't far off, so there was no charge:D

    Next year I am going to buy a road bike and am searching for advise on wheelsets for people my size. I have posted this on other cycling forums and have gotten lots of advice, but don't want to leave any stone unturned.

    The bike that is now at the top of my list is the Cannondale R1000, which comes with Mavic Ksyrium Elites. I have been told these should be "fine," but also told that Bontrager Aero Lites, and a few others would also work for me.

    Do any large riders have experence with the Elites? How long have you ridden them and what type of problems, if any, have you experienced?
     
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  2. serottarider

    serottarider New Member

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    I'm 6'3" and 190 lbs. A couple of months ago I had a spoke fail (actually it was the alloy nipple that failed, rather than the spoke). That was the first spoke failure I've had in over 30 years of riding. I'm into preventive maintainance, so I do have my wheels trued and tensioned regularly and I'm convinced that this helps a lot.

    I have 2 wheelsets. I have a lightweight set that I use for racing, and I also have a set of stock 32-hole Record hubs and Mavic Open Pro rims that I use for training.

    A lot of lightweight wheelsets have a recommended weight limit, often quoted at 190 lbs. Bigger riders, like we are, really push the envelope for lightweight wheelsets. Custom wheels built by a reputable wheelwright might be the way to go.
     
  3. Babbar

    Babbar New Member

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    The Spokinator struck again, twice:mad:

    Yesterday I was just meandering down the street when "SPROING." I was just a little ticked off. I went home and cooled off and decided to wait until today to see if my new wheel came in.

    It didn't, so I said to heck with it and bought 4 spokes, a chain whip, and a cassette tool. The tools were $30 and the spokes $6. I came home, replaced the offending spoke, trued the wheel myself, and set off. Guess what? 5 miles and another of them &$^#*&%) things went!

    Back home slowly, replaced the &$^&*#, trued the wheel again - pretty good, if I do say myself, nary a detectable wobble :D

    These tools have just about paid for themselves already!
     
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