The Thread about Nothing....

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Hitchy, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. paulambry

    paulambry Well-Known Member

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    Last night, my wife and some of her friends discussing a book we'd all read. I said I didn't like the book because I couldn't sympathise with the protagonist because she was such an a-social, unpleasant character. Wife's friend says, "Oh, that's just a male perspective." Fuck. Fuck I hate that.

    "No, that's my perspective. I'm not all men and all men are not me." is what I thought to say, the next day.
     


  2. classic1

    classic1 Well-Known Member

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    She only said that because that is the sort of logic women use
     
  3. classic1

    classic1 Well-Known Member

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    Did u see what I did there?
     
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  4. paulambry

    paulambry Well-Known Member

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    hahaha... yes, I saw that.

    But, "logic" and "women"? Wot?
     
  5. matagi

    matagi Well-Known Member

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  6. classic1

    classic1 Well-Known Member

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    What book was it Paul?
     
  7. classic1

    classic1 Well-Known Member

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    Oh my this is good. There is more rock and roll in the first 4 minutes of this concert vid than there has been in the universe over the last 15 years. It’s stiffy inducing stuff
     
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  8. paulambry

    paulambry Well-Known Member

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  9. paulambry

    paulambry Well-Known Member

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    I don't read much non-fiction; it's usually only when My Bride gives a book unequivocal praise. One I'm reading now is a cracker. Boy Swallows Universe by Trent Dalton.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/37558445-boy-swallows-universe

    Here's a few I've read lately:
    Eggshell Skull by Bri Lee. Loved the first half; loathed the second.

    Erebus: The Story Of A Ship by Michael Palin.
    Enjoyed every page. If you've seen season one of The Terror, you'll love it.

    Helter Skelter By Vincent Bulgioso
    Already mentioned this. Top read.

    Dead Man Walking By Kate McClymont
    Details the tom fuckery of two criminally inclined Sydney property dicks. Outrageous tales of two utter bastards.

    36 Views of Mt Fuji by Cathy Davidson
    If you have any interest in things Nippon, this is a must-read. I've read it 5 times now.

    Dark Emu by Bruce Pascoe.
    Completely demolished the notion of terra nullius. Super interesting.

    Banking Bad by Adele Ferguson.
    This will make you vomit every time you hear IOOF, AMP or the big 4 banks mentioned. Cunts.

    A Sporting Chance by Titus O'Reily
    Just loved this.

    The Peter Grant series of books by Ben Aaronovitch, starting with Rivers of London.
    This is kinda Harry Potter for grown-ups. Read it for a distraction... I would recommend the audiobooks; peerlessly narrated by Kobna Holdbrook-Smith.
     
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  10. paulambry

    paulambry Well-Known Member

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    lols..

     
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  11. EoinC2

    EoinC2 Well-Known Member

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    I picked up an open-face helmet here in Bangkok, and my niece dropped by to send my full-face helmet back to KL.
    I’m heading up 1 / 32 / 12 to Mae Sot tomorrow, then the 105 / 108 to Mae Hong Son on Friday. I then head up the 1095 / 107 and back down 1 to Chiangrai on Saturday. Sunday is back up the 1 to Mae Sai, and across to Chiang Khong via the 1290 (with a few side excursions along the way.
    Monday is cross over to Laos, and then it’s dirt tracks up through Xiengkok / Muang Long / Muang Sing around the Green Triangle, and try to cut across from Namo Neua to Bountai, and up to Gnot Ou / Phongsali. If it’s too wet, I may just spend my time around Muang Long area (or 3 weeks in a hotel in Chiangrai and just pretend I went bush).
    On the way back out, I’ll prolly head down to Pakbeng, and cut over the hills back to Houayxai. I need to get to Lampang ~26th to meet up with Mrs E, before riding back down via Isaan.
    I’m pushing the 1st bit, as I want to max the time in Laos, which is less planning and more seeing how foobarred I can get, plus the 1st part in Thailand I can get to pretty much anytime (plus I’ve spent a lot of time up there already, with family here and there).
    Enfield got it’s second oil change today as a little present for behaving. Ferkin’ traffic in Bangers on a rainy day on a biggish bike is somewhere fairly low on the fun-o-meter. I headed out at 5am today, and it was splendid. Coming back at 4pm was less so. Another 5am start tomorrow should have me well free before the mayhem starts.
     
  12. paulambry

    paulambry Well-Known Member

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    Nice. There's a lot of green on the map on that route. And the roads look a lot better than I had imagined they would be. At least, in the dry. Can't see what the roads look like over the border in China... no little yellow googleman allowed in Middle Kingdom! Having never been there - do they drive on the correct side of the road like they do in Thailand?
     
  13. EoinC2

    EoinC2 Well-Known Member

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    Laos / China / Myanmar / Cambodia / Vietnam all drive on the right side. Thailand / Malaysia / Singapore drive on the left.
    Made it up to Mae Sot today. Getting out of Bangkok is as bad as getting in (although 04:45 start made it a little mellower). Bangkok has lots f roads where motor sickles are not allowed, but they don’t show up on MapsMe, and generally. The sign of prohibition is just as you’ve started onto them. Numpties like me provide a field day of opportunity for fine-collecting (although I didn’t get caught today).
    It’s a a long, flat slog from Bangers up to Tak, but the hills and twisties begin straight after Tak, and remain all the way through to the Chiangrai plain. Saw a B-train truck doing mental speeds down the Mae Sot side of the range today.I was impressed by an emergency run-off lane for trucks that was basically a very steep short hill, with a ‘V’ at the bottom of it, and a telegraph pole mounted square in the middle at the top. My guess is that most trucks would auger straight into the hill like a brick wall. Any truck fortunate enough to negotiate the sudden ‘V’ would wrap itself with gusto around the pole. Any truck that managed to negotiate these 2 show-stoppers, would then launch into oblivion on the other side of the little hill.
     
  14. EoinC2

    EoinC2 Well-Known Member

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    Section from Mae Sot to Mae Sarieng was wonderful. The whole road to Mae Hong Son was great riding, but that first section was strangely special. It was early morning, with lots of fog, and all the local peeps setting about their jungle / farm / school day. Staggeringly beautiful, with very little traffic, other than locals.
    There’s been plenty of rain, so the terraced rice paddies are lush, and a vibrant, near psychedelic, green.
    I finally got to drop the bike... in a moment of total numptiness. I’d parked with the side stand on the low side of camber of the road, and over-compensated in launching back to the vertical. I let her down gently, but couldn’t hold her back, resulting in her lying down for a sleep on her right side on the road. I picked her up fully laden, with no spectators that I could see or hear. Crash bar did it’s job (better than I did, anyway).
    Today, it’s on to Chiangrai. I’m doing full-ish (foolish?) days to get to Laos, where I can start tutu-ing, rather than traveling, which I’m looking forward to. I’m riding past plenty of experiences that I’d like to stop and immerse in, but those will have to wait for a return next year with Mrs E.
     
  15. classic1

    classic1 Well-Known Member

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    Any time I hear of Laos I’m reminded of this.

     
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  16. EoinC2

    EoinC2 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah - Merkins may find it easier to remember Laos if they think of the highest bombing per capita they managed to achieve - Nearly equal to all of the bombs they dropped in WWII.
     
  17. Wilchemy

    Wilchemy Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like the adventure is going well, Eoin!
     
  18. EoinC2

    EoinC2 Well-Known Member

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    Indeed, it is. Chilling in Chiang Rai today, getting a few bits & pieces. Short ride tomorrow looping up and over to Chiang Khong, then Laos and dirt tracks take over on Tuesday.
    Yesterday’s foobar was me getting told I couldn’t proceed further down a lane. Following a 50-point turn (instead of getting off and pivoting on the side-stand), I fired the bike up, and it died every time I put it in gear. The thought process to realise and act on it having a side-stand sensor was performed at a glacial pace. To save face, I just pretended I was doing complex diagnostics, whilst discreetly kicking the side-stand up.
    All of my bikes have been from the age of steam, so electrickery, beyond the Realm of Lucas - Lord of Darkness, is still to be explained in terms of smoke travelling down plastic tubes.
     
  19. EoinC2

    EoinC2 Well-Known Member

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    Had an excellent ride up to the Mae Sai / Tachilek border, then across to Chiang Saen, and tracked the Mekong down to Chiang Khong. Nice riding through villages, farms, and bush.
    In Chiang Khong, I happened to meet up with the guy who runs the GT-Rider website, and we did some back-tracking up to the hills to the North.
    Despite there being plenty of rain, the Mekong is exceptionally low. The 5 Chinese dams wouldn’t have anything to do with it??? I’d say that the wonderful Plah Buek (Giant Mekong Catfish) has Buckley’s chance of surviving humans’ appetite for electrickery.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mekong_giant_catfish
     
  20. EoinC2

    EoinC2 Well-Known Member

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    IMG_0692.JPG IMG_0738.JPG IMG_0734.JPG 9A555026-386F-4A23-9417-4037503402A7.jpeg 10hrs to ride 150km through warlord territory. Only dropped the bike 3 times in quagmires, but Iwas foobarred by the time I made it out onto the Xiengkok / Muang Long road. I’d run out of water at the last dropbear site (where the bike went past horizontal in laying down across a truck rut), and the bike was running on fumes, despite me having picked up a 2l bottle of “petrol” at a Tai Lu village along the way.
    Fantastic ride. Each of 3 river fords had me wondering if I could cross, or would somehow have to find my way back, with darkness setting in.
    In the last 20km, I met 3 trucks fully bogged, coming the other direction. It gave me hope that there was a path through - What it should have done is given me fear for how they had cut up the track ahead.
    It started to rain, just as I made it out the North end. Any earlier, and it would’ve been all-over-Red Rover.
    After the 3rd dropbear incident, I doubted if I had enough strength and hydration for another, so I faced every quagmire like a lifer approaches the barbed wire prison fence. The trouble was, all of the big quagmires were on left bends (which there were a lot of), in the jungle, where no Sun gets through. The bends were long enough that I couldn’t see which track to commit to, so I just took to praying to every God known to mankind, plus a few made-up ones.
    Today is rest and clean up in Muang Long. Shoulder is a bit foobarred
     
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