The Trans-fat Conspiracy

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by Pendejo, Jun 25, 2006.

  1. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    Have you checked the ingredients on the yogurt and bran flakes? I've been eating plain yogurt for years, only to be shocked when I checked the label recently and found hydrogenated oil in it (which can also be listed under its As for the peanut butter, what is PHO? I've bought pure peanut butter in stores and it tastes fine to me. Also, I'm sure you could make your own.
     


  2. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    Sorry, my above message got truncated. The aliases are shortening, modifed food starch, modified vegetable starch, vegetable ghey, etc. Also, check your bran flakes - I've found that most cereals have the crap in them.
     
  3. aacliment

    aacliment New Member

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    PHO is partially hydrogenated oil. Sorry was lazy to type the whole thing. I will have to check the labels on the yogurt and the bran flakes. Thanks for the info.
     
  4. RickF

    RickF New Member

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    Modified food starch and modified vegetable starch are not aliases for trans-fat. A trans-fat is hydrogenated or partially hydroginated oils. There is no fat or protein in starch - modified or otherwise. Starch is a complex carbohydrate. Modified starch is exactly what happens when you cook a starch, whether it is corn, wheat, potato, etc. The starch turns into a gel, but it is still a carbohydrate and is digested as such and converted by the body to sugar. Modified starch in no way becomes a trans-fat.

    I have no problem with the on-going rant about trans-fats, but check your facts about what is and is not a trans-fat. PHO is a trans-fat.
     
  5. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    Upon further checking, I think you're right about this, Rick. My original information came from a book which is no longer in my possession. But I will try to retrieve it so I can check whether the error was theirs, or mine.

    Thanks for the correction.
     
  6. Verdugo

    Verdugo New Member

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    yo Pendejo, how much trans fat is in that cheese? cause I had Domino's today. and how'd you find this out? I'm only 18 but I don't wanna start clogging my arteries before I hit 30.
     
  7. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    Verdy, my information comes from Domino's website, which lists the ingredients for everything they sell. The normal cheese they use on their pizza contains modified food starch, which (see above) I mistakenly thought contained trans fat. So that seems to be OK. Their thin crust and regular crust also is OK, but their deep dish crust does contain hydrogenated soybean oil (as does their breadsticks and cinnastix). Sorry about the mistake.
     
  8. redmarkerdown

    redmarkerdown New Member

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    Any bread, Any jelly, and Any cheese. Grill and they work excellent.

    And I agree with the starch being a carbo only 99.9%
     
  9. redmarkerdown

    redmarkerdown New Member

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    The only foods that have trans fat in them are foods that have trans fat on the nutrition panel. Am I correct in saying this?
     
  10. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    Look at the list of ingredients. This is from sixwise.com:

    "If you also read ingredient lists, terms to watch out for include anything that says hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated, along with vegetable shortening or margarine, which may also be hydrogenated."

    So you won't see "trans fat" in the ingredient list - you need to look for the above terms. Then you also have the chart showing the percentages of the various components. "Trans fat" does by law now have to be listed there, but if there is less than 1/2 gram per serving they are allowed to put 0%, another way to mislead the public.
     
  11. redmarkerdown

    redmarkerdown New Member

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    What if I find a product that proclaims 0g of trans fat yet when I read the ingredients list I cannot find anything of suspect.
     
  12. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    Then eat the damned thing!
     
  13. Archibald

    Archibald New Member

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    LOL!!
    i was thinking the same considering most products show 0g trans fat, and i was thinking that they've done the dodgy to say that because the level is below 0.xg of trans fat.
    I then saw Clif bars which show 0g on the nutrition list and also states "no trans fat" elsewhere on the label.
    makes you wonder whether they're boasting this because they're below that limit or whether they actually do not contain trans fat...
    ingredient list appears clear...
     
  14. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    As far as I've been able to determine, Archy, the following is a complete list of ingredient terms that do or could mean trans fats. If the list of ingredients doesn't include any of these, it almost certainly doesn't contain trans-fats (unless the food companies have found another way to sneak them in):

    partially hydrogenated, hydrogenated, starch, food starch, vegetable starch, margarine, vegetable ghee

    Does anybody else know terms I've missed?
     
  15. RickF

    RickF New Member

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    You are still wrong about starch, food starch, and vegitable starch. These are complex carbohydrates and have nothing to do with fat or trans-fat. Vegetable ghee is a refined vegetable oil with coloring and flavoring aded, but it is not necessarily hydrogenated, and therefore, not all vegetable ghee is a trans fat. Hydrogenated oil, partially hydrogenated oil, margarine, and shortening contain trans-fats. Hydrogenated (or modified) starches would still be carbohydrates. Taken to the extreme, they would become sugars, but they would never become trans-fat.
     
  16. crystle

    crystle New Member

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    Hi,

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  17. Pendejo

    Pendejo Member

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    You would have thought that earlier posts had taken the starch out of me, but for some reason I reverted back. So, from now on, ignore anything I say about starches! And you're also correct about the vegetable ghee - it might or might not contain trans-fat; there's no way to know from the label information.
     
  18. Archibald

    Archibald New Member

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    cheers!
    none of that in the ingredient list, so i'll continue to enjoy 'em!
     
  19. Joolie

    Joolie Banned

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    Hi,

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