The Ultimate Touring Bike



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J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
It's kind of hard to tell you this without sounding as if I'm laughing at the guy. I'm not - if I
had the cash I'd do the same. But here goes.

There is a man, a social cyclist, not given to excess speeds (there are rumours he has been
overtaken by old ladies with baskets on their bikes, but these are unfounded and probably not
entirely true in every detail maybe). He is, in other words, a jolly and sociable chap.

Approaching a magic birthday somewhere between 30 and 50 he decided to treat himself to a new shiny
bike, and being a tourist it's a touring bike. So. A titanium frame, titanium forks (from Russia I
think), triple chainset, campag rear, Brooks B17 with titanium rails, grab-ons (!) on the bars, and
a lightweight rack - plus the lightest dynamo known to man, a Bisy headlight, and now - wait for it
- 36-hole Hope hubs with aero spokes and aluminium spoke nipples :)

This bike has to be tied down to stop if blowing away in a light breeze, friends, and if it ever
exceeds 20mph I'd be surprised. It brings a smile to my face every time I even think about it.

Guy
===
** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
dynamic DNS permitting)
NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
work. Apologies.
 
T

Terry J

Guest
> This bike has to be tied down to stop if blowing away in a light breeze, friends, and if it ever
> exceeds 20mph I'd be surprised. It brings a smile to my face every time I even think about it.

To be honest, I would really love that bike, and I don't need it either.

The neighbour opposite me has spent several times as much on a motorised killing machine that nobody
needs, and his wife's car is so close to the ground that if they put speed bumps in it'll never
leave the estate.So I would be really pleased to see that money spent on any kind of pushbike, even
a titanium Faberge egg.

At least he didn't get a £4000 full sus mtb to ride to work on!

TerryJ
 
A

Andymorris

Guest
Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
> It's kind of hard to tell you this without sounding as if I'm laughing at the guy. I'm not - if I
> had the cash I'd do the same. But here goes.
>
> There is a man, a social cyclist, not given to excess speeds (there are rumours he has been
> overtaken by old ladies with baskets on their bikes, but these are unfounded and probably not
> entirely true in every detail maybe). He is, in other words, a jolly and sociable chap.
>
> Approaching a magic birthday somewhere between 30 and 50 he decided to treat himself to a new
> shiny bike, and being a tourist it's a touring bike. So. A titanium frame, titanium forks (from
> Russia I think), triple chainset, campag rear, Brooks B17 with titanium rails, grab-ons (!) on the
> bars, and a lightweight rack - plus the lightest dynamo known to man, a Bisy headlight, and now -
> wait for it - 36-hole Hope hubs with aero spokes and aluminium spoke nipples :)
>
> This bike has to be tied down to stop if blowing away in a light breeze, friends, and if it ever
> exceeds 20mph I'd be surprised. It brings a smile to my face every time I even think about it.
>

What's the problem with that?

OK so the guys spent maybe 2k more than a damnn fine bike that weighs maybe 2 or 3 lbs more and
would be imposable to tell the difference from the saddle.

Well if he can afford it, and his family don't go short for it why not, people will spend 5 times
that on prestige cars, that sit in the same jams as the rest of us.

He's splashed out a relatively small (compared to cars, golf club membership, sailing etc) so a
beautiful thing that will bring him great pleasure.

I'd of lost the aero spokes and Al nips tho. Maybe dropped to 32h on the front instead.

--
Andy Morris

AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
 
C

Chris French

Guest
In message <[email protected]>, AndyMorris <[email protected]> writes
>Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
>> It's kind of hard to tell you this without sounding as if I'm laughing at the guy. I'm not - if I
>> had the cash I'd do the same. But here goes.
>>
<snip>
>
>What's the problem with that?
>
I don't think Guy was implying there was ...
--
Chris French, Leeds
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

> Approaching a magic birthday somewhere between 30 and 50 he decided to treat himself to a new
> shiny bike, and being a tourist it's a touring bike. So. A titanium frame, titanium forks (from
> Russia I think), triple chainset, campag rear, Brooks B17 with titanium rails, grab-ons (!) on the
> bars, and a lightweight rack - plus the lightest dynamo known to man, a Bisy headlight, and now -
> wait for it - 36-hole Hope hubs with aero spokes and aluminium spoke nipples :)

Ah, he could've bought the *actual* ultimate touring bike instead. The Streetmachine GT actually
*encourages* me to cruise along waving regally in armchair comfort, though it can go rather quicker
than I usually do.

There's more to "ultimate" than not weighing much, especially on a tourer...

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
Terry J wrote:

> To be honest, I would really love that bike, and I don't need it either.

So would I - it just amuses me that one of the slowest cyclists known to humanity has this fantastic
lightweight bike. He's a very good bloke, and I think he's nearly got over the ribbing he received
when the thing first appeared :-D

--
Guy
===
I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
 
T

Tony W

Guest
"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Terry J wrote:
>
> > To be honest, I would really love that bike, and I don't need it either.
>
> So would I - it just amuses me that one of the slowest cyclists known to humanity has this
> fantastic lightweight bike. He's a very good bloke, and
I
> think he's nearly got over the ribbing he received when the thing first appeared :-D

This point may well have been covered -- I've not been paying full attention.

But is it really vital to save every last gram for a touring bike. You're going to hang a ton of
luggage on it -- much of which you could do without, and you're going to ride it 4 to 6 hours a day
for, hopefully, several days. You are unlikely to be breaking any speed records.

Comfort is the main requirement.

There again, if this thing is yer man's hearts desire -- why not.

T
 
C

Chris Malcolm

Guest
"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> writes:

>Terry J wrote:

>> To be honest, I would really love that bike, and I don't need it either.

>So would I - it just amuses me that one of the slowest cyclists known to humanity has this
>fantastic lightweight bike.

But this is extremely sensible! Think about it. The main limitation to bicycle speed is air
resistance, which goes up at somewhat more than the square of the speed. So how much faster will you
cover general distances if you output the same muscular effort on a lighter bike? Obviously the
slower you cycle, the greater the proportional increase in speed due to getting a lighter bike. Or
indeed a bike with lower rolling resistance, more efficient drive train, etc..

In sum, the slower is your normal cycling speed, the greater will be the benefit in increased speed
by buying a better bike, so the slower you normally cycle, logically therefore the more you should
spend on performance aids.

The only reason most folk think the other way round (that fast folk should be the ones to spend
money on performance aids) is simply because the fastest cyclists are usually the ones who *care*
more about their speed, and are prepared to spend a lot more money on
it. Just as well, really, considering how much less benefit (in terms of increased speed) they get
from what they buy.

In terms of value for money in terms of increased speed per pound spent on performance enhancing
extras, the slow cyclist gets very much the best return.

--
Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 650 3085 School of Artificial Intelligence, Division of
Informatics Edinburgh University, 5 Forrest Hill, Edinburgh, EH1 2QL, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/daidb/people/homes/cam/ ] DoD #205
 
A

Andymorris

Guest
chris French wrote:
> In message <[email protected]>, AndyMorris <[email protected]> writes
>> Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
>>> It's kind of hard to tell you this without sounding as if I'm laughing at the guy. I'm not - if
>>> I had the cash I'd do the same. But here goes.
>>>
> <snip>
>>
>> What's the problem with that?
>>
> I don't think Guy was implying there was ...

Sorry, your right.

--
Andy Morris

AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
 
W

W K

Guest
"Chris Malcolm" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

> The only reason most folk think the other way round (that fast folk should be the ones to spend
> money on performance aids) is simply because the fastest cyclists are usually the ones who *care*
> more about their speed, and are prepared to spend a lot more money on
> it. Just as well, really, considering how much less benefit (in terms of increased speed) they get
> from what they buy.

You mean there is actually a benefit from buying brakes that are 20 grams lighter?

When this "benefit" costs 1-4-tons quid per gram (, and in terms of running I now know that I'm as
athletic as the best 70 year olds, its time, not money I need to spend.)
 
P

Peter Clinch

Guest
Patrick Herring wrote:
> Tony W wrote:

>>But is it really vital to save every last gram for a touring bike.

> Absolutely! How else do you relax so as to enjoy the ride?

Quite easily, if you have a large, sprung and padded armchair like I do. I find it *far* more
relaxing than my old (considerably lighter) upright tourer where true relaxation is difficult with
weight on my arms and wrists and a crick in my neck from looking up to see where I'm actually going
after a few hours...

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
 
T

Tony W

Guest
"Patrick Herring" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> >
> > But is it really vital to save every last gram for a touring bike.
>
> Absolutely! How else do you relax so as to enjoy the ride?

Your the sort that cuts the handle off your touring toothbrush to save weight are you?
 
D

Dave

Guest
"Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
> "Patrick Herring" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > >
> > > But is it really vital to save every last gram for a touring bike.
> >
> > Absolutely! How else do you relax so as to enjoy the ride?
>
> Your the sort that cuts the handle off your touring toothbrush to save weight are you?
>
>
YOU TAKE A TOOTHBRUSH!!!! - what an unnecessary amount of unneeded weight. Do you take toothpaste
too ??<snigger> Dave ;-)
 
W

W K

Guest
"Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> >
> > "Patrick Herring" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > > >
> > > > But is it really vital to save every last gram for a touring bike.
> > >
> > > Absolutely! How else do you relax so as to enjoy the ride?
> >
> > Your the sort that cuts the handle off your touring toothbrush to save weight are you?
> >
> >
> YOU TAKE A TOOTHBRUSH!!!! - what an unnecessary amount of unneeded weight. Do you take toothpaste
> too ??<snigger> Dave ;-)

I have to take an ELECTRIC toothbrush. Makes you think you should leave your stoker behind.
 
H

Helen Deborah V

Guest
The message <[email protected]> from "Dave" <[email protected]>
contains these words:

> > Your the sort that cuts the handle off your touring toothbrush to save weight are you?
> >
> >
> YOU TAKE A TOOTHBRUSH!!!! - what an unnecessary amount of unneeded weight. Do you take toothpaste
> too ??<snigger> Dave ;-)

Yebbut all those hi-carb energy drinks & foods leave your teeth coated in gunky plaque on Audax
rides, especially those which are 400km+.

Travel toothbrushes which fold into their own handle & toothpaste tubes which are 80% used keep the
mouth fresh without weighing a ton.

--
Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
 
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