the weighting game

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by gravelmuncher, Mar 8, 2004.

  1. Due to the distinct lack of hills around here, one has developed the need for a little strength training. Does anybody know of any links to weight programs suitable for the road cyclist? I crossed the Blue Mountains on Sunday - Glenbrook to Lithgow - 80km @ 3.05:00, 26 Av - single most painful thing i've ever done. Although the 81 km/h down Mt Victoria Pass was awesome!

    ~j~



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  2. DRS

    DRS Guest

    gravelmuncher <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]
    > Due to the distinct lack of hills around here, one has developed the
    > need for a little strength training. Does anybody know of any links
    > to weight programs suitable for the road cyclist? I crossed the Blue
    > Mountains on Sunday - Glenbrook to Lithgow - 80km @ 3.05:00, 26 Av -
    > single most painful thing i've ever done. Although the 81 km/h down
    > Mt Victoria Pass was awesome!


    Try http://www.velopress.com/weigtrainfor.html.

    However, I've seen some routines for cyclists which are the most convoluted,
    bizarre pieces of rubbish which could only have been written because the
    magazine had a few blank pages that month. In truth, there's nothing
    special about cycling that it really needs anything particular by way of
    anaerobic training. A standard full body routine with an emphasis on
    strength/endurance rather than hypertrophy (muscle size) will typically
    contain more reps and lighter weights than would be the case if you were
    bodybuilding, that's all.

    For example, you might do 3 sets by 15 reps by 65% of your 1 Rep Maximum
    (1RM) instead of 3 sets by 10 reps by 80% of your 1RM. Strength/endurance
    training (lower weights/more reps) typically does not result in as much
    increase in muscle mass as hypertrophy training (medium weights/medium
    reps). This is important for cyclists as they don't want to be carrying
    around lots of extra mass, especially in the upper body.

    Note: calculating your 1RM: http://www.bodybuildingpro.com/onerepmax.html.

    Note: Keep the breaks between sets fairly short, no more than 60 seconds.
    Strength/endurance training benefits from higher intensity (but it's not
    circuit training!).

    1. Like any full body routine you start with the upper legs:

    Squats 3x20:
    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Quadriceps/BBFullSquat.html. A special
    note on squats: you MUST leave your ego at the door when learning this
    exercise. Form is always more important than weight but that's even more
    true with squats. You can hurt yourself doing any exercise when you're
    lifting ridiculous amounts of iron but if you're emphasizing strength form
    is absolutely critical before you start going for broke. Start with just
    the bar (10kg). Do not aim for anything more than 50% bodyweight whilst
    learning to squat and if it takes you two or three months to get them right
    then so be it. Get your bum right back, avoid rounding your lower back
    (looking up helps) and keep your knees behind your toes.

    2. Then the lower legs:

    Calf Raises 3x15:
    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Gastrocnemius/SLStandingCalfRaise.html

    Note: I like to save time by super-setting these two exercises.
    Super-setting means doing one then the other with no break: Squat - CR -
    break - Squat - CR - break... etc.

    3. Typically you'd then move to the upper body, first the chest:

    Flat Bench Press 2x15:
    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/PectoralSternal/BBBenchPress.html. The
    BP also works the triceps fairly hard, along with the anterior (front)
    deltoids (shoulder).

    4. Then the upper back, either:

    Lat pulldowns 2x15:
    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/LatissimusDorsi/CBFrontPulldown.html
    or Seated Rows 2x15:
    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/BackGeneral/CBSeatedRow.html. Both also
    work the biceps fairly hard (especially stationary seated rows) along with
    the posterior (rear) deltoids.

    5. The shoulders next:

    Upright Row 2x15:
    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/DeltoidLateral/BBUprightRow.html. Note,
    you should have your hands a tad closer than the guy doing the demo. The
    correct distance is two thumb lengths. It feels a little more awkward but
    it's more effective. This works the lateral (side) deltoids as well as the
    traps (the triangular bit running from your shoulder to your neck).

    6. Abs next then you're done:

    Crunches 2x30:
    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/RectusAbdominis/WtCrunch.html. On
    alternate sessions do Twisting Crunches 2x30:
    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Obliques/WtTwistingCrunch.html. Both
    can be done with knees bent or with legs up on a fitness ball. Start with
    2x15 and move up to 2x30. Contrary to popular belief doing hundreds of
    crunches will not make your abs grow any faster or show any sooner.

    7. When you start loading up the bar when squatting you put a fair load on
    your lower back. If you feel your lower back needs extra work then do
    hyperextensions (these are optional):

    Back hyperextensions 2x15:
    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/ErectorSpinae/WtBackExtension.html.
    Note that the demonstrations are done on a inclined bench, which is the
    easier way to do them because it limits the range of motion. It's more
    common to do them on a flat hyperextension bench, which is more difficult.
    You can do these while holding a weight to your chest but that's not for
    beginners. Start with 1x15 and move to 2x15 when you feel ready. I like to
    super-set my abs work with hypers: abs - hypers - break - abs - hypers.

    That's it. Seven exercises per workout if you include the hyperextensions,
    six if you don't (I'm ignoring the variations - you only do one exercise per
    major body group per session) and you've hit every major muscle group and
    just about all of the minor ones as well. You should be able to do this in
    about an hour and a bit tops. If it takes you much more than that then you
    probably need to consider switching to a split routine.

    Your diet is equally important to your workout but first I'd need your
    1a: weight and body fat percentage; or
    1b: height, weight, sex and age; plus
    2: an estimate of how active you are during the day.

    --

    "I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two hours of bloody,
    barbarous torture in gloating detail is considered indicia of religious
    piety, whereas a mere second gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for
    outraged apoplexy."
    Betty Bowers, http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
     
  3. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch Guest

    gravelmuncher wrote:
    > Due to the distinct lack of hills around here, one has developed the
    > need for a little strength training. Does anybody know of any links to
    > weight programs suitable for the road cyclist? I crossed the Blue
    > Mountains on Sunday - Glenbrook to Lithgow - 80km @ 3.05:00, 26 Av -
    > single most painful thing i've ever done. Although the 81 km/h down Mt
    > Victoria Pass was awesome!
    > ~j~



    put weights on your bike

    did this to my father-inlaw in the Adelaide hills a few years back b
    putting an iron bar inside his seat tube still made catching the littl
    bugger hard tho..


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  4. Hitchy

    Hitchy Guest

    gravelmuncher wrote:
    > Due to the distinct lack of hills around here, one has developed the
    > need for a little strength training. Does anybody know of any links to
    > weight programs suitable for the road cyclist? I crossed the Blue
    > Mountains on Sunday - Glenbrook to Lithgow - 80km @ 3.05:00, 26 Av -
    > single most painful thing i've ever done. Although the 81 km/h down Mt
    > Victoria Pass was awesome!
    > ~j~



    G'day

    Ric Stern will argue until he is blue in the face, that a weigh
    training program for 'trained' cyclists will provide absolutely n
    benefit whatsoever. In fact, (his argument goes), it is likely to b
    detrimental!. You there Ric...????,. Anyway, on bike strength trainin
    is probably the 'go'. Try pushing 'big' gears (whilst seated) u
    whatever hills there are. Also plenty of 'interval' in big gears

    cheers

    Hitch

    cheers

    Hitch


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  5. >>>>> "DRS" == drs <[email protected]> writes:

    DRS> Try http://www.velopress.com/weigtrainfor.html.

    Excellent, thank you DRS.

    Would this routine be suitable for a daily commuter, say on a Saturday?

    My thinking is that more than once a week would be required to see any
    gains but that would mean working out on a cycling day and recovering on
    a cycling day.

    Your thoughts?

    --
    Cheers,
    Euan
     
  6. DRS

    DRS Guest

    [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote in message
    [email protected]
    >>>>>> "DRS" == drs <[email protected]> writes:

    >
    >> Try http://www.velopress.com/weigtrainfor.html.

    >
    > Excellent, thank you DRS.
    >
    > Would this routine be suitable for a daily commuter, say on a
    > Saturday?
    >
    > My thinking is that more than once a week would be required to see any
    > gains but that would mean working out on a cycling day and recovering
    > on a cycling day.
    >
    > Your thoughts?


    Once per week is better than nothing but your muscles will start to detrain
    over 7 days. A full body routine should be done at least twice per week and
    preferably thrice. I do a split routine M-W-F. I train more for
    hypertrophy than strength, although obviously you can't lift stupid amounts
    of iron for any length of time without getting somewhat stronger, and I use
    the extended sets of 15 when I'm in a cutting phase. Obviously you can't
    lift stupid amounts of iron for any length of time without getting a bit
    stronger. I try to avoid heavy cardio (30 minutes and over) on my anaerobic
    days because it's known to interfere with recovery. Ideally you do
    anaerobic and aerobic training on alternate days. If you need to do heavy
    cardio then do it after the weights session, if for no other reason than it
    will use the energy (muscle glycogen) you need for lifting.

    One of the benefits of weights training is that by promoting at least some
    muscle growth it helps you change your body composition. I've just pretty
    much finished a bulking/cutting cycle and whilst my body weight is roughly
    what it was when I started my body fat percentage has dropped significantly,
    which means the difference must be made up by new muscle. I like my bike
    but I didn't get that new muscle from cycling. :)

    --

    "I'm proud that I live in a country where witnessing two hours of bloody,
    barbarous torture in gloating detail is considered indicia of religious
    piety, whereas a mere second gazing upon a woman's breast is cause for
    outraged apoplexy."
    Betty Bowers, http://www.bettybowers.com/melgibsonpassion.html
     
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