The Word of the Day for July 9 is...

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Tom Schulenburg, Jul 9, 2003.

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  1. From Merriam-Webster:

    <BEGIN>

    The Word of the Day for July 9 is:

    peloton \peh-luh-TAHN\ noun
    : the main body of riders in a bicycle race

    Example sentence: Thousands of cycling fans lined the race route, relaxing in lawn chairs as they
    waited for the peloton to speed by.

    Did you know? If you've ever watched the Tour de France on television, you've seen plenty of the
    peloton, the seemingly endless flow of brightly colored riders making up the central group. You may
    have also gained some inadvertent insight into the word itself, which as you may have guessed is
    French in origin. In French, "peloton" literally means "ball," but it is most often used with the
    meaning "group." It's frequently used in the bicycling context, just as in English, but it can also
    refer to a group in a marathon or other sporting event. French "peloton" can also mean "squad" or
    "platoon," and since we've told you that you probably won't be too surprised to learn that it is
    also the source of our word "platoon."

    <END
     
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  2. Gary

    Gary Guest

    Gosh! I did not know the accent was on the LAST syllable. Thanks.

    Tom Schulenburg wrote:

    > From Merriam-Webster:
    >
    > <BEGIN>
    >
    > The Word of the Day for July 9 is:
    >
    > peloton \peh-luh-TAHN\ noun
    > : the main body of riders in a bicycle race
    >
    > Example sentence: Thousands of cycling fans lined the race route, relaxing in lawn chairs as they
    > waited for the peloton to speed by.
    >
    > Did you know? If you've ever watched the Tour de France on television, you've seen plenty of the
    > peloton, the seemingly endless flow of brightly colored riders making up the central group. You
    > may have also gained some inadvertent insight into the word itself, which as you may have guessed
    > is French in origin. In French, "peloton" literally means "ball," but it is most often used with
    > the meaning "group." It's frequently used in the bicycling context, just as in English, but it can
    > also refer to a group in a marathon or other sporting event. French "peloton" can also mean
    > "squad" or "platoon," and since we've told you that you probably won't be too surprised to learn
    > that it is also the source of our word "platoon."
    >
    > <END
     
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