"The Zone" Diet by Barry Sears ??

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Doug Gilliam, Dec 6, 2003.

  1. Doug Gilliam

    Doug Gilliam Guest

    Hello,

    I've just read a book named "The Zone" by Dr. Barry Sears which claims a lot of success especially
    with world class athletes including the Stanford Swim Team.

    I'm not an expert on nutrition and I don't play one on TV but it seems to make a lot of sense and
    appears to be more balanced than the other high carb or high protein/fat diets.

    Basically it calls for getting 40% of calories from carbs, 30 % from protein, and 30% from fat.
    Of course, it also wants you to get mostly the good types of all of these macronutrients and
    not the bad.

    I'd be interested to hear any comments positive or negative about this diet. I'm not on this diet at
    this point (actually, I've never dieted but it would probably help me a lot if I did) but am
    considering moving my eating habits more in this direction.

    Any thoughts?

    Regards,

    Doug Gilliam
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>, Doug Gilliam wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I've just read a book named "The Zone" by Dr. Barry Sears which claims a lot of success especially
    > with world class athletes including the Stanford Swim Team.
    >
    > I'm not an expert on nutrition and I don't play one on TV but it seems to make a lot of sense and
    > appears to be more balanced than the other high carb or high protein/fat diets.
    >
    > Basically it calls for getting 40% of calories from carbs, 30 % from protein, and 30% from fat.
    > Of course, it also wants you to get mostly the good types of all of these macronutrients and not
    > the bad.
    >
    > I'd be interested to hear any comments positive or negative about this diet. I'm not on this diet
    > at this point (actually, I've never dieted but it would probably help me a lot if I did) but am
    > considering moving my eating habits more in this direction.
    >
    > Any thoughts?

    As Lyle McDonald pointed out in a recent thread, using percentages is not a good approach. Protein
    requirements for endurance athletes are about .6-0.8gm/lb body weight.

    Split the rest between carbs and dietary fat. It probably isn't necessary to eat a high carb/low fat
    diet, a 4:3 ratio may work just fine for some people.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  3. Ff

    Ff Guest

    On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 18:33:46 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Any thoughts?
    >

    None whatsoever in his case.
     
  4. Sam

    Sam Guest

    "Doug Gilliam" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]t...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I've just read a book named "The Zone" by Dr. Barry Sears which claims a
    lot
    > of success especially with world class athletes including the Stanford
    Swim
    > Team.
    I have it from a good source at Stanford that his claims of assisting the team are
    exaggerated.

    >
    > I'm not an expert on nutrition and I don't play one on TV but it seems to make a lot of sense and
    > appears to be more balanced than the other high
    carb
    > or high protein/fat diets.
    False. He plays with the research, misquoting and misanalyzing some of it (I know some
    of the authors of papers Sears claims supports his ideas. Also, his anecdotal evidence
    is a joke.

    >
    > Basically it calls for getting 40% of calories from carbs, 30 % from protein, and 30% from fat.
    > Of course, it also wants you to get mostly the good types of all of these macronutrients and not
    > the bad.

    Percentages are just a mask. He also uses the "blocks" to mask the fact that the diet is just
    that, a diet as in energy intake reduction.

    >
    > I'd be interested to hear any comments positive or negative about this
    diet.
    > I'm not on this diet at this point (actually, I've never dieted but it
    would
    > probably help me a lot if I did) but am considering moving my eating
    habits
    > more in this direction.
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    You might well lose weight, but I would not recommend it for someone wishing to train or
    even be a recreational athlete.

    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Doug Gilliam
     
  5. Get car batteries and tools from Sears. Not diets.
     
Loading...
Loading...