Theft Prevention



raynim

New Member
Apr 10, 2004
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I am getting into touring and have a major question along with many, many others.

If one is staying in a tent along the road or otherwise how do you prevent the theft of your bike during the night, especially in the more crime ridden parts of the world? I imagine typical bike chains would be laughed at by most crooks and who would want to haul them anyway. Also I can't imagine carrying a tent that would fit a bike, and who wants to sleep with what is sure to be a grease, dust, and dirt ridden steed. Suggestions? What do you guys do.

Thanks,
Ray
 

geoffs

New Member
Sep 8, 2003
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Hi Ray

Personally, I like to avoid the crime ridden parts of the world. Lots of other places to cycle without taking undue risks.
We just use a Krytonite cable lock that will go around a small tree or someother equally imovable object. This is threaded through the rear wheel, the frame of the bike and with the front wheel having been removed and included in this as well.
If we were at a restaurant the tandem was ALWAYS within sight.
If the tandem was left when we went into a Museum, shops etc., it was always parked out in the open where it would be obvious if someone was doing anything to it. Our tandem received a lot of interest while we were touring and people were always coming up to have a closer look.
The only incident that we had while we were away was a security guard adjusting the rear deraileur for us when we were in the Matisse museum in Nice which I fixed on the flyas soon as I realised what had happened.

Cheers

Geoff
 

meanderthal

New Member
Mar 17, 2005
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raynim said:
I am getting into touring and have a major question along with many, many others.

If one is staying in a tent along the road or otherwise how do you prevent the theft of your bike during the night
Thanks,
Ray

Ray,

If you stealth camp, your bike is hidden, too, so there's no need to secure it.

If you camp in campgrounds, a padlock and simple cable threaded through the picnic table or around a tree is enough. I've found family campgrounds to be quite safe for my belongings, especially if they're not situated next to a city.

I'm thinking of downsizing my cable from my hefty one to one of smaller gauge--stranded, but only as thick as a guy-wire--1/8" diameter, more or less. My object is just to dissuade the amateurs who like to ride off on unattended, unlocked bikes for the mischief of it. I don't like carrying the weight necessary to foil a pro, if that's even possible.

Instead, just be sensible. Keep your true valuables with you at all times--shopping, dining, showering, sleeping. Keep your loaded bike within sight as much as possible. Seek out the small-town cafes and grocery stores, not only for their homey friendliness but also because your stuff can likely be kept in sight. The familiar small-town complaint of "nothing ever happens here" is good news to touring cyclists, who may themselves be the only "happening" for the entire day. Follow Geoff's advice: plan a route that avoids trouble. Adventure is everywhere--it is what you make of it; danger is an unnecessary component.

Lew