Therapuetic Massage and Swimming

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by David, Jan 7, 2006.

  1. David

    David Guest

    Any one using massage as part of their training out there? I have a client I
    massage who is swimming and would like some pointers to what swimmers
    require in their massage techniques.
    David
     
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  2. a.c.

    a.c. Guest

    David wrote:
    > Any one using massage as part of their training out there? I have a client I
    > massage who is swimming and would like some pointers to what swimmers
    > require in their massage techniques.
    > David


    Could you expand on that a bit further?
    Theraputic as in ... ? Sports massage, remedial/medical massage,
    Holistic, swedish... what?

    As for "massage techniques", if you could mention a few by way of
    example, it may help clarify your question.
     
  3. a.c.

    a.c. Guest

    David wrote:
    > Any one using massage as part of their training out there? I have a client I
    > massage who is swimming and would like some pointers to what swimmers
    > require in their massage techniques.
    >


    Could you expand on that a bit further?
    Theraputic as in ... ? Sports massage, remedial/medical massage,
    Holistic, swedish... what?

    As for "massage techniques", if you could mention a few by way of
    example, it may help clarify your question.David
     
  4. a.c.

    a.c. Guest

    David wrote:
    > Any one using massage as part of their training out there? I have a client I
    > massage who is swimming and would like some pointers to what swimmers
    > require in their massage techniques.
    > David


    Could you expand on that a bit further?
    Theraputic as in ... ? Sports massage, remedial/medical massage,
    Holistic, swedish... what?

    As for "massage techniques", if you could mention a few by way of
    example, it may help clarify your question.
     
  5. Madelaine

    Madelaine Guest

    David wrote:
    > Any one using massage as part of their training out there? I have a client I
    > massage who is swimming and would like some pointers to what swimmers
    > require in their massage techniques.
    > David
    >
    >

    I don't use this in general, but saw someone one time for 10 minutes who
    immediately could tell that I work on a computer and that I swim. She
    did something to push the bottom of the lats in toward my waist--it was
    wonderful, like having a new back afterwards. It bordered on magical. I
    recently took a yoga class with Manuoso Manos where we did chair pose
    and pushed our arms toward the back rather than exactly vertical, and
    this had the same effect.
    Madelaine
     
  6. David

    David Guest

    Ok then I was enquiring the use of Swedish/Trigger point massage within
    swimming in general. All sports are different as far as massage is concerned
    owing to different muscle groups and there uses with each sport.
    David
    "a.c." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > David wrote:
    >> Any one using massage as part of their training out there? I have a
    >> client I
    >> massage who is swimming and would like some pointers to what swimmers
    >> require in their massage techniques.
    >> David

    >
    > Could you expand on that a bit further?
    > Theraputic as in ... ? Sports massage, remedial/medical massage,
    > Holistic, swedish... what?
    >
    > As for "massage techniques", if you could mention a few by way of
    > example, it may help clarify your question.
    >
     
  7. a.c.

    a.c. Guest

    David wrote:
    > Ok then I was enquiring the use of Swedish/Trigger point massage within
    > swimming in general. All sports are different as far as massage is concerned
    > owing to different muscle groups and there uses with each sport.
    > David


    ah, ok then, cos I wondered if you knew that because of your original
    post.
    Then you'll also know that different swimmers will require different
    treatments. Not only because of varying degrees of swimming, varying
    focus on specific swim strokes, but also varying life styles etc.
    In which case what your client needs is reletively specific to him/her.
    So, if I may offer this, what you want is information from those who
    concentrate on one stroke, as to what they would like / need on a
    physical mobility enchancement level to better achieve their aims.
    And then you can better tailor to varying clients.
    I am not such a swimmer.

    > "a.c." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > David wrote:
    > >> Any one using massage as part of their training out there? I have a
    > >> client I
    > >> massage who is swimming and would like some pointers to what swimmers
    > >> require in their massage techniques.
    > >> David

    > >
    > > Could you expand on that a bit further?
    > > Theraputic as in ... ? Sports massage, remedial/medical massage,
    > > Holistic, swedish... what?
    > >
    > > As for "massage techniques", if you could mention a few by way of
    > > example, it may help clarify your question.
    > >
     
  8. Man o' Tea

    Man o' Tea Guest

    David wrote:

    > Any one using massage as part of their training out there?


    My wife and I used to get regular deep-tissue massages from a very
    strong-fingered woman in CT. I mean really deep, too, using elbows and
    climbing on the table for more leverage. (She was a marathoner, too.)
    Interestingly, she told me that the right side of my body was
    "overtrained" compared to the left. I always felt great after one of
    those sessions.
     
  9. David

    David Guest

    So deep tissue maybe the go then thanks for the answers
    David
    "Man o' Tea" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > David wrote:
    >
    >> Any one using massage as part of their training out there?

    >
    > My wife and I used to get regular deep-tissue massages from a very
    > strong-fingered woman in CT. I mean really deep, too, using elbows and
    > climbing on the table for more leverage. (She was a marathoner, too.)
    > Interestingly, she told me that the right side of my body was
    > "overtrained" compared to the left. I always felt great after one of
    > those sessions.
    >
     
  10. a.c.

    a.c. Guest

    Man o' Tea wrote:
    > David wrote:
    >
    > > Any one using massage as part of their training out there?

    >
    > My wife and I used to get regular deep-tissue massages from a very
    > strong-fingered woman in CT. I mean really deep, too, using elbows and
    > climbing on the table for more leverage. (She was a marathoner, too.)
    > Interestingly, she told me that the right side of my body was
    > "overtrained" compared to the left. I always felt great after one of
    > those sessions.


    That not uncommon.
    What's more, many people are sometimes surprised when their dominant
    side is the "injured" side when infact the real impact/injury occured
    on the other side.

    But getting back to the original question, using massage as part of
    training is quite specific to the sport concerned, in the same way as a
    shot-put thrower will have a different training regime than a high
    jumper and both will vary in their training to a swimmer... though
    anyone, sportive or not, may quite like deep tissue massage.

    David most likely knows what a postural assesment is. To tailor desired
    swimming posture to actual posture requires the template information to
    begin with in order to make comparisons.

    Then, in particular, exploiting the inverse-reflex through massage to
    assist in attaining the postural goals, specific, tailored massage
    become a training aid as specific to the sport as is required.
     
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