They go for runners too!

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Wafflycathcsdir, Feb 24, 2003.

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  1. It's not just cyclists who are the are the targets for 4-wheel-drive-man. Runners are vulnerable too
    - and it's another hit-and-run case.

    See http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/2793127.stm

    Cheers, helen s

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  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > It's not just cyclists who are the are the targets for 4-wheel-drive-man. Runners are vulnerable
    > too - and it's another hit-and-run case.
    >
    > See http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/2793127.stm

    Ha! They won't get me this way unless they can get their 4WDs up the fells.

    It does make you wonder if some people bother using their full set of mirrors.

    Colin
     
  3. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Colin Blackburn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Ha! They won't get me this way unless they can get their 4WDs up the fells.

    Wot -- take it off road. It would get muddy.
     
  4. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Mon, 24 Feb 2003 14:13:40 -0000, Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It does make you wonder if some people bother using their full set of mirrors.

    Of course - those are for the ones you miss with the bull bars :-/

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  5. Rory

    Rory Guest

    [email protected] (wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > It's not just cyclists who are the are the targets for 4-wheel-drive-man. Runners are vulnerable
    > too - and it's another hit-and-run case.
    >
    > See http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/2793127.stm

    What worries me is this quote from the police:
    | A police spokesman said: "This vehicle was forced to move out to pass the runners, and in doing so
    | the trailer has hit at least three of them.

    Who "forced" the driver to move out? An armed hijacker in the car? The police? This sums up a
    driver attitude that I encounter daily: stopping and waiting "until it is safe to pass" seems not
    to be an option. Mostly, this endangers the driver in question and anyone coming the other way, as
    they cross a solid white line on a blind bend. And invariably, they end up at a junction or lights
    seconds later.
     
  6. Rory wrote:
    >
    > Who "forced" the driver to move out? An armed hijacker in the car? The police?

    What's just as bizarre is the fact that this took place during a large organised road roace on a
    three lap course. If the roads aren't closed (often are) then there must have been adequate signage
    and separation.

    Not wanting to reduce the responsibility of the driver I do have to ask whether the orgainsers and
    police took adequate measures to protect the runners.

    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  7. CLogicRogerC wrote:
    >
    > Getting road closure for races is getting harder and harder.

    Further evidence of the hegemony of the motorist. I'm a runner, too, and I was aware of this
    problem. Is it something that has got worse since supermarkets started opening on Sundays? I wasn't
    living in the UK at the time this started. Do cycle racers have the same problems?
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  8. In article <b3fisf[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > CLogicRogerC wrote:
    > >
    > > Getting road closure for races is getting harder and harder.
    >
    > Further evidence of the hegemony of the motorist. I'm a runner, too, and I was aware of this
    > problem. Is it something that has got worse since supermarkets started opening on Sundays? I
    > wasn't living in the UK at the time this started. Do cycle racers have the same problems?

    From what I've seen here a lot of road cycling events are not races, ie time trials, audaxes, etc.
    and so don't fall under the same rules. I've never seen a running time trial on the road!

    I don't run races on the roads much at all and the few I have done have had no closures just
    marshals at crossing points. There have been notable individual problems, the Morpeth to Newcastle
    half marathon has moved from Jan 1st to mid-Jan as the police couldn't provide the staff on new
    year's day. Talking to other runners there does seem to be an increasing problem with road
    events---most of which are obviously much lower-key that the London Marathong, GNR, etc. I stick to
    orienteering, fell-running and mountain marathons, that way it's just land-owners to be persuaded!

    Colin
     
  9. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "CLogicRogerC" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I think the police have a lot on their plate and this makes them
    reluctant to
    > support smallish sporting events - a great shame. I guess that the footy
    clubs
    > pay for policing - and race organisers would have to do the same. Not easy
    if
    > its a small event.

    Race organisers do have to pay. You would be amazed at what the Met can charge just to put out some
    cones (I can't remember the amount but for the price I would have expected a Bobbie every few yards
    -- not just a cone.)

    T
     
  10. John Blake

    John Blake Guest

    In message id <[email protected]> on 25 Feb 2003 11:01:58 GMT,
    CLogicRogerC wrote in uk.rec.cycling :

    >I think the police have a lot on their plate and this makes them reluctant to support smallish
    >sporting events - a great shame. I guess that the footy clubs pay for policing - and race
    >organisers would have to do the same. Not easy if its a small event.

    Football clubs do pay for policing yet the police also have the power to refuse a fixture being
    moved if it clashes with some other event where resources need to be deployed. Events such as
    Notting Hill Carnival in a small area in West London caused such a drain on police resources that
    they refused to cover football matches in London on August Bank holiday and that date has been
    dropped from the football calendar. Marches are also having the same effect nowadays.
     
  11. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Thu, 27 Feb 2003 13:09:02 +0000 someone who may be John Blake <[email protected]>
    wrote this:-

    >Marches are also having the same effect nowadays.

    It was fascinating to see the number of officers the police threw around the Armadillo in Glasgow a
    few weekends ago. No doubt a scheme to boost their pay with lots of overtime, most of them were
    entirely unnecessary.

    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E I will always explain revoked
    keys, unless the UK government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
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