They weren't real.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Mason, Jun 27, 2003.

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  1. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    In another thread I mentioned that at the site of a local cycling fatality, the widow had tended to
    the flowers since her husband's death in AUG 00 (seen here in 2000) .

    http://www.simonmason.karoo.net/zflowers.htm

    This caused someone to mention that it was irrational behaviour to tend to these flowers after such
    a long period of time, so I rode the 7 miles there last night and looked at the bouquet.

    On examining the flowers, it seems that they are plastic ones, so the initial concern that the
    grieving widow was tending them after nearly 3 years wasn't true - my mistake.

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
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  2. I don't think it's irrational at all; my wife and I and her family tend and replace the flowers on
    their ancestors' graves and will continue to do so for as long as any member of the family remains
    alive. In oriental society (my wife is Chinese/Vietnamese), such behaviour is regarded as not only
    normal but virtually expected.

    Philip Taylor
    --------
    Simon Mason wrote:
    >
    > In another thread I mentioned that at the site of a local cycling fatality, the widow had tended
    > to the flowers since her husband's death in AUG 00 (seen here in 2000) .
    >
    > http://www.simonmason.karoo.net/zflowers.htm
    >
    > This caused someone to mention that it was irrational behaviour to tend to these flowers after
    > such a long period of time, so I rode the 7 miles there last night and looked at the bouquet.
    >
    > On examining the flowers, it seems that they are plastic ones, so the initial concern that the
    > grieving widow was tending them after nearly 3 years wasn't true - my mistake.
     
  3. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Philip TAYLOR [PC87S-O/XP]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I don't think it's irrational at all; my wife and I and her family tend and replace the flowers on
    > their ancestors' graves and will continue to do so for as long as any member of the family remains
    > alive. In oriental society (my wife is Chinese/Vietnamese), such behaviour is regarded as not only
    > normal but virtually expected.

    That's OK, tending a grave, but the poster who questioned the tending of flowers at a lamp post said
    that the person who died is not there and has no connection with the lamp post. If the widow puts
    flowers on his grave then that's a different thing altogether, I suppose -at least his remains are
    physically there.

    Like you wouldn't put flowers on a hospital bed for years if someone had died there instead
    of a road.

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  4. Yes, I do find that stranger, but there are number of sites not far from my home (S.E. London/N.W.
    Kent) where people do replace flowers at the scene of a fatal RTA for years after the death ...

    ** Phil.
    --------
    Simon Mason wrote:

    [snip]

    > That's OK, tending a grave, but the poster who questioned the tending of flowers at a lamp post
    > said that the person who died is not there and has no connection with the lamp post. If the widow
    > puts flowers on his grave then that's a different thing altogether, I suppose -at least his
    > remains are physically there.
    >
    > Like you wouldn't put flowers on a hospital bed for years if someone had died there instead
    > of a road.
     
  5. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Philip TAYLOR [PC87S-O/XP]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Yes, I do find that stranger, but there are number of sites not far from my home (S.E. London/N.W.
    > Kent) where people do replace flowers at the scene of a fatal RTA for years after the death ...

    I believe Marc Bolan's tree is fairly festooned with flowers, put there by people who never met him
    - and he was killed in 1977, so it does go on.

    http://www.bolan.co.uk/tag/three-japanese-fans.jpg

    Simon
     
  6. There's one on the A628 Woodhead pass between Manchester and Sheffield that never ceases to amaze me
    - masses of flowers, photos, even little trophies. I don't understand it - tend a grave by all
    means, but taking over a section of the verge on a main road? Still, each to their own, and if it
    helps them through the grieving, then fine.

    "Philip TAYLOR [PC87S-O/XP]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Yes, I do find that stranger, but there are number of sites not far from my home (S.E. London/N.W.
    > Kent) where people do replace flowers at the scene of a fatal RTA for years after the death ...
     
  7. Ivor Cave

    Ivor Cave Guest

    Simon Mason wrote:

    > That's OK, tending a grave, but the poster who questioned the tending of flowers at a lamp post
    > said that the person who died is not there and has no connection with the lamp post. If the widow
    > puts flowers on his grave then that's a different thing altogether, I suppose -at least his
    > remains are physically there.
    >
    > Like you wouldn't put flowers on a hospital bed for years if someone had died there instead
    > of a road.
    >

    Maybe not but most road deaths are avoidable. Such things as going to fast for the road reading a
    map while driving eating a hamburger or texting someone. The flowers on lamp post and railings do
    actually bring home to drivers that cars do kill people and hopefully will pay more attention to
    what they are doing if only for the mile after seeing the flowers. I don't think most drivers
    (including myself) are aware of the danger they pose to pedestrians and cyclist. So seeing these
    flowers my make people think its not worth the risk of killing someone to save 10 minutes on a
    journey time.

    Ivor Cave
     
  8. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Ivor Cave <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > So seeing these flowers my make people think its not worth the risk of killing someone to save 10
    > minutes on a journey time.
    >

    I was the poster Simon originally referred to. I partly agree with your statement, but as I
    mentioned in the original thread, in Australia it is said (may not have been exhaustively
    researched) that people "rubber- necking" these flowers in curiosity/reverence/sadness/whatever
    are the cause of many more accidents at that spot (not necessarily fatal). It is almost like the
    first accident created it's own little accident black-spot. Indeed I have seen one apparently
    danger free road with three of these little memorials in the space of about 100 metres. But as
    this was Australia, perhaps the kangaroos hide behind the bushes just there and play chicken with
    the traffic?

    Graeme
     
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