Thinking about a HRM (Alienator bug off...).

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Volnix, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Hi! [​IMG]

    I was on a cycling tour ride the other day and there was a -doctor- there. He was a cardio-something.

    Even though I thought that cardio data was just for training apparently I was informed that I should not get over a maximum heart rate for my age or else... or else... [​IMG]

    I was informed that wrist worn sensors are not that good... Should I go for a blue tooth strap with strava?

    You know anything about this -maximum- heart rate allowed stuff? [​IMG]


    Thanks [​IMG]
     
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  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    The only way to know your maximum heart rate is to test for it. The formulas for calculating max heart rate aren't accurate at all. All exercise based HRM's are susceptible to error. Chest strap HRM sensors can generate false high heart rates through static charge generated by certain fabrics rubbing the casing. Dry contacts can generate bad signals for most HRMs. Bluetooth HRMs work just as well as ANT or ANT+ HRMs. If you're already using your phone and Strava to record rides, then it makes sense to get a Bluetooth HRM. I don't know that there are many phones, if any, that have native ANT or ANT+ receivers. With all that said, I've seen no shortage of riders of all ages, even those in their 60's and 70's, that ride without HRMs. Maybe they're not aware of the impending doom. It makes sense for people with certain health issues to use HRMs, but I don't know that there is an actual significant health risk to riding without an HRM.
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. I think that THIS may be the only formula which anyone in this Forum needs to know ...

    [​IMG]
     
  4. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    It would be extremely unhealthy to exceed your maximum heart rate, but is impossible to do under normal circumstances - that why it is a maximum. Only in the case of an arrhythmia could you realistically exceed your maximum, metabolic demand, heart rate.

    Maximum HR is a moving target and is different for everybody. The old Max HR = 220 - Age in years may get you in the ballpark range, but there are a lot of exceptions to the rule. To find yours, you need data - and have to test for it.

    You can easily avoid getting near you max heart rate even without a monitor. Your body will tell you when you are reaching a maximal HR effort, its agony and unsustainable. It is not just feeling that something is hard, but tunnel vision, face going numb, shaky extremity territory.

    Now if you have certain health issues, it may be advisable to keep training intensities below a percentage of your max HR - but those recommendations should come from medical professionals tailored for that individual.
     
  5. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Actually except a few psych concerns I am quite healthy (still). Every time I get a blood and heart test everything is fine... But I have no idea if I am going beyond the "healthy" rate of heart BPM whilst on my dashes...

    Might check on one of those sensors... (Damn I start feeling like one of those doc-stuff addicted grannies now...) [​IMG]
     
  6. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    "Only in the case of an arrhythmia could you realistically exceed your maximum, metabolic demand, heart rate."

    Or...passing under low 440,000v triple strand high tension wires...

    Just look at the various online charts for 'fit athlete' or whatever description fits you for a consensus max heart rate for your age, gender, weight or whatever plug-in attributes are listed.

    That will get you close. Then, just go ride with monitor and start recording your max reading. Work on some hard jumps to top speed and max it out. Waste yourself repeatedly on all the stupidhard local climbs. Keep track of your max.

    Re-riding your ride, digitally, on Cateye's 'Atlas' website it is fun to watch your playback of speed/altitude/heart rate/cadence RPM's and see how the spikes compare to your efforts and the terrain.

    Altitude is kind of a novelty to my training, but I do enjoy looking down at the display and seeing an old man's numbers that would do a young racer like Collin proud.
     
  7. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Volnix,

    Chest straps seem to work the best. Use whichever one supports the equipment that you're using. ANT+ or Bluetooth doesn't really matter.

    If you've been very active for years I wouldn't be too concerned about impending doom if trying really hard. If you were a couch potato for years and just took up the sport then I'd take things more cautiously.

    Heart rate for a given effort can change depending on time of day, hydration, how rested you are, altitude, whether the hot chick you're trying to hang on to the back of has a nice ass... etc etc.

    I stopped looking at heart rate when I got a power meter and the battery in the HR monitor strap died...
     
  8. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Thanks... I think I will have a look at the local vendors for bluetooth one since Strava supports bluetooth connectivity even in the free version that I am using...

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by swampy1970 .
    whether the hot chick you're trying to hang on to the back of has a nice ass... etc etc.

    Its winter here now, so not too many "distractions" on the road. [​IMG]
     
  9. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    ... or seeing the price of a Campagnolo Super Record groupset and then realize you get a thumb shifter button thingy a bit like you used to on Shimano Sora.

    :D
     
  10. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Note that not all versions of bluetooth are compatible and some wahoo bluetooth devices work on newer iPhones but not android or older iPhones for that reason. Read the fine print and you'll be fine.
     
  11. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Cool, will do... Thanks [​IMG]
     
  12. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    "... or seeing the price of a Campagnolo Super Record groupset"

    My heart has 43 years worth of cardiological immunity to Campy electro-sticker shock trained into it.


    "I stopped looking at heart rate when I got a power meter and the battery in the HR monitor strap died..."

    Like the old nuke power generation saying, my power is too cheap to meter. And too insignificant for an SRM to be calibrated to!

    If the altitude mapping from the various websites were more consistent, I might have some faith in it. More junk science is all it is now.
     
  13. WillemJM

    WillemJM New Member

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    I try and exceed my maximum HR at least twice a week, to get to where it was 35 years ago, but darn, so far it is about 30 beats slower and I have not achieved a new maximum. In fact, the only way I get close to my new old guy maximum is to stay off the bike for a week or so and then do a test.

    Just make sure you had a medical exam and there are no health issues, then go for it. For a newby, start slow and build over time which will highlight any underlying problems.

    One of my best friends (We rode pro together back in the day) was off his bike for 22 years, got back, trained for six months, did a metric century at his maximum effort and passed from a brain aneurism.

    Linky http://www.sport24.co.za/OtherSport/Cycling/Ertjies-Bezuidenhout-dies-20120229

    So it is important that you start slow if you are new to this and older. Give it at least a year or two to get your full base back or in place.

    I use my HR monitor seldom, developed feel over the years and HR is not a very meaningful measurement compared to watts. The only thing watts tell me is how well I will be doing in the next race, and it helps with calorie calculations to get my weight in check. Using both HR and Power once or twice a month really is more than I need.

    Experience replaces paralysis by analysis, in most cases I ride without a computer, it helps not to remind me that the older I get the better I was. [​IMG]
     
    steve likes this.
  14. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    "Experience replaces paralysis by analysis."

    I like that!
     
  15. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    If you have half a brain then there's no massive amount of analysis to be done to get the basics set. One good test and you're done. I guess I was lucky that I had lab tests and power measured back in the 90s when I actually went faster than an old lady pushing a shopping cart and I have something to compare current numbers too. Training with a power meter is way easier than without - unless your legs are shot, the it can be hell on wheels. Long distance riding ( greater than 100 miles) is far easier and faster too. You get to avoid that "fresh legs" enthusiasm in the first 40 miles that leads to grimmish times towards the end. That's when you get a fat b'stard like me just cruising past at 20 something miles an hour, with a smile on my face, wondering why y'all are starting to ride so slow...
     
  16. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    After a bit of health concern earlier this fall that led to two stress tests, an angiogram, and a lung capacity test, my wife is getting me a heart rate monitor for Christmas, just so I can keep an eye on the situation. I'm thinking nothing fancy, perhaps a Polar FT4.

    Oh. And the problem turned out to be a lung blockage. Wish they found that before we did the angiogram.
     
  17. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Pulmonary embolus?
     
  18. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    I give myself a couple snorts of QVar twice a day. It's got a steroid that's probably controlled, but . . . I'm sure I could find a doctor who would backdate my TUE. It's supposed to open the airway and heal any inflammation.

    The condition is probably something I've lived with for a long time and only became a noticeable problem with age. I grew up with a lot of secondhand smoke.

    Thanks for the tips on HRMs. GPS looks tempting.
     
  19. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    No, it's about capacity to exhale completely. I'm retaining too much CO2, and that reduces the concentration of O2 when I inhale. Besides the inhaler, I'm working on breath control, too.
     
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