Thinking about buying a steel frame road bike



Hey guys, I want to share a bicycle cover for everyone. Because last week I bought one, I very like it. In comparison to other bike covers, this one is thicker, and more durable. It keeps water out better, although there are no bike covers that I have come across that to not leave a damp layer on the bike over the places where the cover was making contact with the bike.

The strap on the underside of this cover comes with a nice buckle, instead of the velcro that comes with most others.

Lastly, the size is ideal. It is big enough to fit large sized bikes, and the elastic around the bottom will keep it snug around medium to small adult bikes.
This way you can find it:https://www.amazon.com/AYPBAIM-Bicy...qid=1480757170&sr=1-42&keywords=bicycle+cover
YOU ARE WELCOME!

I really don't think people need a heavy duty bicycle cover UNLESS they park it exclusively outside 24 hours a day all year round. However the question the poster wanted to know was if anyone covered their bike while touring, that particular cover that you showed would be too bulky to take on a touring trip; besides most people don't cover their bikes when touring, most only cover their saddles and some cover their chains.

These are only examples of what I'm talking about.

https://www.amazon.com/White-Lightn...480937479&sr=8-1&keywords=bicycle+chain+cover

https://www.amazon.com/Ventura-Bicy...480937598&sr=8-23&keywords=bicycle+seat+cover
 
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I forgot to cover my steel frame and as you can see the paint now is completely stripped. :D

How is everyone?? :)
 
Volnix! Where the Hell have you been? Did you find a job in Greece yet? All your crash injuries healed up?
 
Volnix! Where the Hell have you been? Did you find a job in Greece yet? All your crash injuries healed up?

Well I certainly wasn't growing ganja Bob.. :D

Very nice to see you... :)

Yeah the accident thing flopped... But I'm not putting as many miles in as I used to.. just commuting actually carrying chickens from the market. :D

I applied for a job which is targeted towards us unemployed ppl here and it kinda looks good.. we'll see..

Hey Trump won! :D Has Ohio turned into Monaco yet??? :D

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Yeah, we got Trump elected. Now let's see if he can ******** the world. Ohio ain't Monaco. More like England with Amish.
 
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Yeah, we got Trump elected. Now let's see if he can ******** the world. Ohio ain't Monaco. More like England with Amish.

Your Ohio... I was talking with some freaks in one of these new anonymous apps and their Ohio was kinda more like Baghdad.. :D they were kinda "out of it" too... :D

Hey, my main man Obama was here and boy was he ******.. not even the 50 yuro fish grilled on Poseidon's very own Trident couldn't cheer him up.. :D

Where's MotownBoy? Did he grow up already and bought a stainless Cinelli doing brevets and Fondos? or did he went for the front of the peloton and got a Dogma? Did you get a Cinelli? Hows that Trek you were rocking? :D
 
I agree your view. But, if people really love their bike, it should be make covering their bike into a habit. Just like the feeling of a clean, shining bicycle, ready for a ride. You know, you need keeps your bike safe during all your adventures, for those extra windy days.

When you're touring it's a bit difficult to maintain a clean shining bicycle because you're riding in the rain, and or rain soaked streets, streets covered with berries or some such muck that splatter all over you bike, you're riding in wind, a bike just simply gets dirty while riding, and it isn't feasible when touring to clean your bike every night before you go to bed. Fenders will help more than a cover will since most dirt you pick up is while riding not parked. Again a lot of people tour all over the world in all sorts of conditions, some conditions are simply horrible, and a very few cover their bikes, I have yet to see a bike covered when I'm at campground.

Even if you go and do a google search for bicycle touring gear, or what to take on a bicycle tour, not one site will mention taking a bicycle cover that I've ever seen, not even the #1 touring website Adventure Cycling, see: https://www.adventurecycling.org/re...e-travel-basics/what-to-take-and-how-to-pack/
And the guru of touring Ken Kifer doesn't have one on his list of stuff to take either: http://www.phred.org/~alex/kenkifer/www.kenkifer.com/bikepages/touring/campgear.htm

I think it probably depends on where you'll be camping, If you are spending most of your time camping in wind swept sandy (desert) areas a cover may be a good idea.
 
Frooooze my man... I kinda remembered you when getting my last tires... Went for the spesh-roubaix 23-25 (non ETROO) gimmick. :D aaah the plushness...

Cover? You guys rent bikes or something?

Even in touring you should have access to a shed to avoid re lubricating... Only thing I packed when I was touring once was a smurf ghost figurine! :D
 
Frooooze my man... I kinda remembered you when getting my last tires... Went for the spesh-roubaix 23-25 (non ETROO) gimmick. :D aaah the plushness...

Cover? You guys rent bikes or something?

Even in touring you should have access to a shed to avoid re lubricating... Only thing I packed when I was touring once was a smurf ghost figurine! :D

VOLNIX! You're back, what happened to you? I like my Spesh-roubiax pro 23-25, they do feel good just not sure about the flat protection yet but supposedly their top notch, and they seem to roll well.

Like I said before, I do weekend tours in the late spring to early fall at various campgrounds and run into quite a few folk touring across country and none of them (so far anyways) ever carried or used a tarp for their bikes, and I haven't had to either. No matter if some do or don't it's a personal preference.
 
VOLNIX! You're back, what happened to you? I like my Spesh-roubiax pro 23-25, they do feel good just not sure about the flat protection yet but supposedly their top notch, and they seem to roll well.

Like I said before, I do weekend tours in the late spring to early fall at various campgrounds and run into quite a few folk touring across country and none of them (so far anyways) ever carried or used a tarp for their bikes, and I haven't had to either. No matter if some do or don't it's a personal preference.

Nothing happened I just couldn't type the words "have you thought about a cyclocross bike brah?" another time.. :D

Yep.. these exactly.. it was either those, which I got on sale too or another pair of Rubino.. but the rubino pro controls are new for this year, are visibly dual compound (which kinda split on a pair of maxxis) and had to order them too..

I suspect that the 60g less they are came straight out from the flat protection too.. :D but we'll see..
 
Did you get a Cinelli? Hows that Trek you were rocking?

I still have my steel Cinelli, but I certainly could go for a new carbon model. They are sweet!

I've put in a half-dozen rides on the TREK Emonda this Fall. I slapped a power meter on it last Winter to measure how little power I still produce and training with power data has been fun so far.

The Wilier is still rolling along just fine. The frame has lasted three years without killing me. I installed a new Campy 4-arm spider crankset on it as I had worn out the second 53T ring, the 39T was starting to look bad and one bearing was starting to feel a little rough. Cheaper to buy a new crankset and update the look of the bike.

Right around 8,500 miles in this year. Summer was not real hot, but it was pretty dry. Ohio went through a mini-drought and we got some nice long rides in. I can't remember the last time I got to ride so many 100-mile workout sessions.
 
Sounds pretty good... I did about 4 months of swimming last winter and will be hitting the pool again next week...

Cinelli.. have you seen this xcr one? It's like a Bentley nein? :D

Hmm probably cheaper change the whole thing then everything except the crank arm yeah... Are campy bearing caps very sex-pensive???


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This thread is hysterical. It reminds me of when this forum was hopping.

The debate reminds me of a stint that I did as a car salesman in the 80s for VW. One of the older salesmen, a real old car guy, used to brag to the customers that VWs were made of virgin steel, and the Japanese cars were all made of cheap scrap steel; and that therefore, they would all just rust and collapse in a crash. So I hear this line for several months and assume that he has some basis to say it. A customer comes in and tells me that he is struggling between a Jetta or Accord and I give him the virgin steel line--I mean, does he want an Accord that is going to just fold due to the cheap scrap steel? So this guy turns out to be a Material Specialist Engineer, i.e. a metallurgist, and he absolutely excoriates me for saying something so untrue and silly.

Here is my take on the silliness. I love the look of old Italian lugged frames and wax all romantic about the old world craftsmanship and Columbus tubing. Despite the romance, I would be deluded myself to think that that 60s-80s Italian workshop tech is superior or in league with today's high tech bikes. 1970 Luigi or Carmen in Northern Italy didn't have access to computers or many of the other things that assist today's engineers in designing bikes and choosing materials. Carbon made in Taiwan or Japan and painted there is not inferior to Carbon made in Taiwan that ends up being painted in an Italian shop.

Depending upon how a bike is engineered, it can be made plush or firm regardless of material choice. It can be made incredibly strong regardless of material choice. Carbon fiber is extremely strong given its relatively low weight and it is used in applications requiring far more strength than a bicyclist. Fro example, see the Boeing 787 or some of the military's very high tech aircraft; all include carbon in appropriate applications. The trade off is always the same: lightweight, strong, or inexpensive: pick any two. And the addition of CF as an option and its movement down in cost, has made the entire curve look better for bikes than what was available in the 70s when steel was the only real option.

Again, I love the look of steel--until it rusts or gets dings. In that area, Ti is superior. And feel is so subjective, particularly when you eliminate design as a variable and focus only on material. I love the fact that I can buy an AL CX bike for less than 1500 which is basically race ready for my class. Al still has its place along the curve. It's light and cheap and just about perfect for a CX bike I am only going to race 10 times a year at a local level. I lust after a new Pinarello Dogma in carbon--but its hard for me to want to plunk down that kind of coin when my '06 Litespeed works pretty well with new Ultegra DI components. Campy Bob would probably excoriate me for running Jap components rather than Italian--but they work every time.

But honestly, the steel is safer guys remind me of my dad who insists that his 1968 Chrysler Newport was the safest car ever because it had more steel. Maybe I should go skiing with my old wool pea coat as well!

Peace and Love to all. Thanks for the reminder of when you could jump on this forum and see an old fashioned sandbox fight that only the truly passionate would care about.
 
Steel is expensive...

Yeah the good old days.. I have tossed most of the stuff from that Peugeot p11... I think I will toss the handlebar too since it's half aluminum hand rolled by Pierre whilst eating biscotti and drinking absentee...

The Peugeot frame is kinda thick... Wouldn't die in a crash (aluminum, as crappy as it is is kinda crash worthy).

That 5000€ Steel Cinelli has a sidewall 0.3mm thick .. I wouldn't lean it on stuff much... :D

But all that doesn't matter much as the welds might fail.. welds are supposed to be stronger than the cross sections.. supposed ..
 
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And hence the high concentration of biscotto in the older Atax handlebars..

Aaah Morris! :D

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Nothing happened I just couldn't type the words "have you thought about a cyclocross bike brah?" another time.. :D

Yep.. these exactly.. it was either those, which I got on sale too or another pair of Rubino.. but the rubino pro controls are new for this year, are visibly dual compound (which kinda split on a pair of maxxis) and had to order them too..

I suspect that the 60g less they are came straight out from the flat protection too.. :D but we'll see..

Nope, no cross bike for me, I doubt there is a cross bike in my future either, I can do a lot with a touring bike, almost as much as a cross bike.

I got my Spesh's on sale two, once a year for about a week or two in the spring Spesh puts on a two for one sale on a select few tires, so I got both of mine for $40 total...not including tax of course.

I had Rubino Pro Slick tire, it was a good tire, better than most, but I think the Spesh might have it beat, but time will tell for sure, but $40 I couldn't go wrong! I buy tire on price I don't buy because one is fantastic, in reality most people can't really feel a difference between the most mid priced tires anyways, so I just buy whatever I can get that on sale that will cost less than $30 each, and with closeouts I've ridden on $75 tires for less than $30.
 
Nope, no cross bike for me, I doubt there is a cross bike in my future either, I can do a lot with a touring bike, almost as much as a cross bike.

I got my Spesh's on sale two, once a year for about a week or two in the spring Spesh puts on a two for one sale on a select few tires, so I got both of mine for $40 total...not including tax of course.

I had Rubino Pro Slick tire, it was a good tire, better than most, but I think the Spesh might have it beat, but time will tell for sure, but $40 I couldn't go wrong! I buy tire on price I don't buy because one is fantastic, in reality most people can't really feel a difference between the most mid priced tires anyways, so I just buy whatever I can get that on sale that will cost less than $30 each, and with closeouts I've ridden on $75 tires for less than $30.

I got both for 70€, basically 10€ off both..

They are quite comfortable... Maybe as the gp4000s which got ripped..

The Rubinos I had were the "pro tech" ones which had reinforced sidewalls al'a gatorskins.. but for this year Vittoria introduced their graphite recipe for the compound and the closest to the pro techs were this year's pro controls.

They were 320g for 25 instead of 260g for the 23-25s Roubaix ones... (Some YouTube geezer weighted them and they were actually a bit more then 250g)

which is kinda suspicious as the gp4000s were 240g for 23s with practically non existent sidewalls..

Weird thing is that I could not find anything about their TPI count.. could be 60tpi as far as I know.. the Roubaix ones are 120tpi.

Plus the dual compound smells like trouble..

So far so good.. but I only have about 80k on them..

vittoria-rubino-pro-control-2016-2.jpg
 
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Again, I love the look of steel--until it rusts or gets dings.

Wait! Wut? Steel rusts?!?! You don't say!!!


Campy Bob would probably excoriate me for running Jap components rather than Italian--but they work every time.

My Emonda is all shitmaNO 11-speed equipped. It works. But, it sure doesn't work like Campy. I actually like the SPD-SL pedals. They are comfortable, secure and stable, but Campy cleats are far superior in allowing less resistance in the float. The shitmaNO shifting is light and accurate, but very much meh overall. No positive feel. No mega-changes. And if I get the same service life as my shimaNO fan boi friends, it's not going to hang in there as long as Campy gear. I'll find out soon enough. For a Winter beater (or cross bike in your case) it will suffice...as long as no one sees me riding it.


But honestly, the steel is safer guys remind me of my dad who insists that his 1968 Chrysler Newport was the safest car ever because it had more steel. Maybe I should go skiing with my old wool pea coat as well!

Fatigue tests and real world experience prove that point. Well, your dad's 3-ton Chrysler COULD plow an Aveo 4 miles before he even noticed it was on his front bumper! Other than than...no. Dad's Newport lacked everything except for maybe the seat belts. No ABS, no 4-wheel disc brakes, no crash-lane-following or adaptive cruise radar, no airbags, no padded dash, no crumple zones, no OnStar...the list goes on and on.

I just ordered another carbon bike. I'm getting the same service life out of them as steel. Failure hasn't been the determining mode for replacement. Advancements in technology, features and performance has.

Save the pea coat. It has timeless style.
 
Yep.. and swampy managed to get 10000 of Strava km's (they are shorter and Faaaster then normal kilometers :D ) on a pair of GP4000s.. I didn't. :D not even a fifth of that actually. :D

I totally dig a carbon frame... Don't really care about crashing it as you really shouldn't expect performance from a frame on that area..

But having the epoxy fail and end up with a disassembled Carbon Weed Bong... That's another story..

All the tests and graphs are for just carbon tubes right? Plus, (how many times have you wrote that Volnix? :( ) fatigue strength required to get an ISO certified bike is 10000 ki-lol-its-good-meters. :D I doubt they test for a meter more in that corrupt Chinese "testing facility". :D
 

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