thinking of getting a burley limbo.



S

Steve Knight

Guest
I got hit by a car last Friday and it caused about 720.00 damage to my Italian
racing bike.
http://www.racycles.com/rd/catalog/casati_ellisse_genius_2038691.htm though mine
had different components and the original very nice steel fork.
my leg got banged up a bit and my helmet trashed and my glasses scratched.
the lady who hit me was so nice and so worried about me. she even rooted for me
with the insurance guy (G) gave me a ride home afterwards too. called to make
sure I was ok.
well I got a settlement of 2500.00 I was only after getting my bike and glasses
and helmet taken care of.
I had been thinking of a bent for a long time. but I could not justify
another bicycle and could not afford one.
well here is the opportunity to go for it. we only have one store in Portland
or that sells them but they are great guys. I rode the burley koosah and the ez
sport (they did not have a tourer in the right size in stock) and the limbo. the
ride was a bit harsh but I think it just needs some shock tweaking.
when I started riding last year I was 270 now I am 228. but always the wedge
killed my crotch. my sit bones were fine with all of the better seats I tried
but I always had pin in the crotch that only let me get 20 miles a day in. I am
not sure if it was the fit of the bike or my weight. only going more upright
fixed it but that did not feel right on a racing bike.
I only took short rides yesterday but Tuesday I will try a longer ride on my
usual commute home. I was thinking of getting my wedgie fixed and getting a
cheap mountain bike to pull a trailer. but since I can do that on the bent it is
far more useful. plus I don't have to carry a backpack on it.
Now I am debating on what to do with my wedgle. I can get it up and running
with about 300.00. it needs a new fork (have to break down and get a carbon
fork) but if I get one with a metal steerer I can save quite a bit over having
to replace the headset Chris king) and the stem) and the front wheel needs
replaced. the one man shop that has my bike the guy is real nice. but it kind
of freaked that I was getting a bent. told me all of the horror stories (G) I
think he was kind of ****** that I was not spending the money I got from the
insurance there since he was the one that helped convince them that my bike was
worth so much.
I was thinking of having him part it out and sell the parts (he sells on
consignment) but I really like the bike it is a cool frame with some nice
details and even campy dropouts. and I doubt I would ever be able to by a bike
of the same quality.


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T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Steve Knight wrote:

> ...
> well here is the opportunity to go for it. we only have one store in Portland
> or that sells them but they are great guys. I rode the burley koosah and the ez
> sport (they did not have a tourer in the right size in stock) and the limbo. the
> ride was a bit harsh but I think it just needs some shock tweaking....


There is nothing wrong with the Burley Limbo, but it should be seen as
the equivalent of an upright hybrid bike and not the equivalent of a
road bike. The relatively upright seat and lower BB of the Limbo makes
low speed balance and starting/stopping easier, but also increases
frontal area. The Limbo is also fairly heavy. These two factors will
reduce performance, as will the rear suspension when climbing and
accelerating.

The Burley Hepcat/Django will offer considerably better performance. The
tradeoff will be a harsher ride, trickier low speed handling due to
foot/wheel interference, and greater difficulty starting and stopping
with the higher BB relative to the seat and ground.

--
Tom Sherman - Curmudgeon and Pedant
 
S

Steve Knight

Guest

>There is nothing wrong with the Burley Limbo, but it should be seen as
>the equivalent of an upright hybrid bike and not the equivalent of a
>road bike. The relatively upright seat and lower BB of the Limbo makes
>low speed balance and starting/stopping easier, but also increases
>frontal area. The Limbo is also fairly heavy. These two factors will
>reduce performance, as will the rear suspension when climbing and
>accelerating.



I thought it felt faster then the koosah and the others I have tried. but they
don't look as practical to haul loads with if I want to do that. I do a lot of
starting and stopping too so that's a factor.
not sure if I could handle my legs and arms up like that for longer times
either. they may have one of these in stock to try. though they are pushing my
budget.


>The Burley Hepcat/Django will offer considerably better performance. The
>tradeoff will be a harsher ride, trickier low speed handling due to
>foot/wheel interference, and greater difficulty starting and stopping
>with the higher BB relative to the seat and ground.


I like great performance but I need practicality too. I see hauling trailers for
my errands and sometimes 25# bags of lead (G) I never got all I could out of my
racing bike I just don't have the light weight for it.

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J

john riley

Guest
FWIW the Limbo is about to be replace by the Spider and Nasoke, more
or less suspended versions of the Koosah/Jett Creek.

The Limbo was famous for pogo. I am guessing that if the shock was
softened so the ride was not harsh, it would pogo. If you still want
to consider the bike, make sure about this.

In any case, since it is a discontinued model, if you do decide to go
for it, you should get a discount.

Ride some other bikes too, if they are available.
 
S

Steve Knight

Guest

>The Limbo was famous for pogo. I am guessing that if the shock was
>softened so the ride was not harsh, it would pogo. If you still want
>to consider the bike, make sure about this.
>

I had seen this. but when I was reading they seemed to have had a different
shock on them. but I was planning on trying it with different pressure anyway.

>In any case, since it is a discontinued model, if you do decide to go
>for it, you should get a discount.
>
>Ride some other bikes too, if they are available.


rode a few. there may be a couple more to try. not sure if a short wheelbase is
for me. my legs and arms feel like lead some days (G)

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M

Mike

Guest
Tom Sherman wrote:

>
> There is nothing wrong with the Burley Limbo, but it should be seen as
> the equivalent of an upright hybrid bike and not the equivalent of a
> road bike. The relatively upright seat and lower BB of the Limbo makes
> low speed balance and starting/stopping easier, but also increases
> frontal area. The Limbo is also fairly heavy. These two factors will
> reduce performance, as will the rear suspension when climbing and
> accelerating.
>
> The Burley Hepcat/Django will offer considerably better performance. The
> tradeoff will be a harsher ride, trickier low speed handling due to
> foot/wheel interference, and greater difficulty starting and stopping
> with the higher BB relative to the seat and ground.
>


I have a Limbo and like it, but it is a bit slow ( or is it the engine?)!
Yes, it is high, but that helps viability!! I can see over small cars,
and in my opinion that helps to be seen a lot. But the high seat also means
that unless you have long legs you may not reach the ground when stopped.

Since I weigh about 200# I had to up the spring to and 800# spring
(recommended to go to 850 but they were not available) and adjust the
spring to lots of preload or the bike would PoGo lots. Maybe the harder
spring would have helped without jacking the seat so high.

mike
Burley Limbo - the official bicycle of OhMyWoodness.com

--
http://ohmywoodness.com
(reverse the email)
 
S

Steve Knight

Guest
O
>I have a Limbo and like it, but it is a bit slow ( or is it the engine?)!
>Yes, it is high, but that helps viability!! I can see over small cars,
>and in my opinion that helps to be seen a lot. But the high seat also means
>that unless you have long legs you may not reach the ground when stopped.


the height was a nice feature. it seemed to add stability.

>Since I weigh about 200# I had to up the spring to and 800# spring
>(recommended to go to 850 but they were not available) and adjust the
>spring to lots of preload or the bike would PoGo lots. Maybe the harder
>spring would have helped without jacking the seat so high.


where do you get the springs?

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M

Mike

Guest
Steve Knight wrote:
> O
>
>>I have a Limbo and like it, but it is a bit slow ( or is it the engine?)!
>>Yes, it is high, but that helps viability!! I can see over small cars,
>>and in my opinion that helps to be seen a lot. But the high seat also means
>>that unless you have long legs you may not reach the ground when stopped.

>
>
> the height was a nice feature. it seemed to add stability.
>
>
>>Since I weigh about 200# I had to up the spring to and 800# spring
>>(recommended to go to 850 but they were not available) and adjust the
>>spring to lots of preload or the bike would PoGo lots. Maybe the harder
>>spring would have helped without jacking the seat so high.

>
>
> where do you get the springs?
>


my local recumbent dealer was able to get it - my model has Rock Shox.
But I think newer Limbos have other shocks, but I've not really looked.

mike
 
S

Steve Knight

Guest

>my local recumbent dealer was able to get it - my model has Rock Shox.
>But I think newer Limbos have other shocks, but I've not really looked.


yes they have cane creek shocks.

--
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B

Bob Parnass

Guest
On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 15:25:50 +0000, Steve Knight wrote:

> yes they have cane creek shocks.


I met a Burley Limbo owner who said the shock
mounts on his frame broke and Burley replaced
the frame under warranty.

Is this a common problem with Limbos?
--
=========================================================================
Bob Parnass, AJ9S GNU/Linux User http://parnass.com
 

Jameson

New Member
Jun 20, 2003
5
0
0
Steve Knight said:

>my local recumbent dealer was able to get it - my model has Rock Shox.
>But I think newer Limbos have other shocks, but I've not really looked.


yes they have cane creek shocks.

--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.

Hi Steve:

I just purchased a 2004 Limbo a couple weeks ago. I’ve only managed 65 miles on it so far, but I’m enjoying it very much. The suspension, with the Cane Creek AD-5 air shock, works well and I have not noticed any “pogo” on the roads I’ve ridden. Granted, I haven’t mashed up any truly grand hills so far, so it may be too soon to tell. However, the nice thing about the air shock is that the pressure can be adjusted easily, depending on where I ride. A bit higher for smooth roads, a bit lower on rail-trails or less-than-smooth roadways. The shock is rated for a max pressure of 300 p.s.i. The owner’s manual basically says to pump in your weight, plus or minus 10-pounds, and adjust up or down as your preference dictates. I weigh 215 and have found 220 pounds in the shock make for a nice ride with no detectable pogo for me thus far. But my experience is limited, so keep that in mind.

I decided on the Limbo, even though I knew it would be discontinued after the 2004 model year. I did get a nice deal on it. While suspension can be nice, and it works well, that was not the main reason I ended up with the Limbo. After trying out a variety of bikes by a variety of manufacturers, I decided that I really liked the Burley line-up. But I didn't want a traditional short-wheelbase bike.....at least not at this time. But I did want a bike with a 26-inch drive-wheel. And most bikes with that size rear wheel tend to be traditional LWB bikes such as the Jett Creek, Tour Easy, etc. What struck me about the Limbo was its relatively compact wheelbase of 58-inches. I suppose you'd call it a medium wheelbase. It was the most "compact" bike I found with a 26/20 wheel combination. It fits (barely) into my pick-up truck without having to remove the front wheel. A big plus for me. The Canto (also a nice bike) is just a few inches longer, but didn’t fit in my truck or I might have bought it instead. I know folks mention weight when discussing the Limbo. But it was not a great concern for me. Sure, it weighs more than a HepCat or Django, and is a bit heavier than the Canto, but not enough to bother me. Some of the SUN “EZ” bikes weigh as much or more.

The other reason I liked the Limbo was actually the reason some folks tended not to like it! I enjoy the somewhat taller seat height it has (for a recumbent). I ride in a city-type setting much of the time (though not on crowded "downtown" city streets). What I like about the Limbo is that I feel much more visible to other drivers......able to more easily make "eye-contact" with them...than I would be on a bike with a lower seat height. If I lived in a more rural area, I'd have probably purchased a Canto or Jett Creek instead, as I did like the lower seat height on those bikes. I did almost end up with a Canto. But all things considered, the Limbo suited the kinds of riding I do and the areas where I often ride. That, and the easier transportability of its relatively compact size, sealed the deal for me. While I don't plan to commute to and from center city on the Limbo, I have become somewhat “car-light” over the past year, and I do plan to use the Limbo for shopping and general errands around the neighborhood where I live, as well as for recreational rides and day-tours....both on the street and on various bike-paths and rail-trails.

Though I might wish the seat height were a wee bit lower, I realize the somewhat taller seat height is the result of achieving a relatively compact bike with the 26/20 wheel combination. I’m a shade under 6’ and am able to plant my feet flat on the ground at stops. But it’s close. I can see how shorter folks might have a problem with this bike. The riding position feels “just right” for me, and I preferred it to that of the Jett Creek. The shape & position of the bars, the feel of the linkage steering, and the relationship of seat to bottom-bracket height is great (for me) and suited me better than bikes with very low (or very high) cranks. It’s kind of like a SWB riding position, but on a longer wheelbase bike. I’d agree with folks who said the Limbo is more of an equivalent to a recreational hybrid bike, rather than a road bike of any sort. It has replaced my current upright hybrid. The Limbo isn’t a fast bike, but that was not what I was expecting. It is what it is. A nice all-around bike, comfortable and versatile and I’m happy with it.


Regards,

Jameson
 
S

Steve Knight

Guest

>I just purchased a 2004 Limbo a couple weeks ago. I’ve only managed 65
>miles on it so far, but I’m enjoying it very much. The suspension, with
>the Cane Creek AD-5 air shock, works well and I have not noticed any
>“pogo” on the roads I’ve ridden. Granted,


thanks for the report. I found a place that has the canto if I want to try it.
it's only 1100.00 so it's a bit cheaper. I wanted to try the taiko but I doubt
the wheels would hold up for me. I did a search and I guess the rims are not
great.

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H

harv

Guest
"john riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> FWIW the Limbo is about to be replace by the Spider and Nasoke, more
> or less suspended versions of the Koosah/Jett Creek.
>
> The Limbo was famous for pogo. I am guessing that if the shock was
> softened so the ride was not harsh, it would pogo. If you still want
> to consider the bike, make sure about this.
>
> In any case, since it is a discontinued model, if you do decide to go
> for it, you should get a discount.
>
> Ride some other bikes too, if they are available.


Pogo is usually a design issue where the swingarm pivot is above the
chainline causing a torque reaction to pedalling.
 
M

Mark Leuck

Guest
"harv" <harv*don't*send*spam*to me*@spininternet.com> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "john riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > FWIW the Limbo is about to be replace by the Spider and Nasoke, more
> > or less suspended versions of the Koosah/Jett Creek.
> >
> > The Limbo was famous for pogo. I am guessing that if the shock was
> > softened so the ride was not harsh, it would pogo. If you still want
> > to consider the bike, make sure about this.
> >
> > In any case, since it is a discontinued model, if you do decide to go
> > for it, you should get a discount.
> >
> > Ride some other bikes too, if they are available.

>
> Pogo is usually a design issue where the swingarm pivot is above the
> chainline causing a torque reaction to pedalling.


Would it not also be caused by inadequate dampening by the shock? I suspect
that is more likely the case here than by peddling
 
H

harv

Guest
"Mark Leuck" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:b6gdd.278701$D%[email protected]_s51...
>
> "harv" <harv*don't*send*spam*to me*@spininternet.com> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>
>> "john riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>> > FWIW the Limbo is about to be replace by the Spider and Nasoke, more
>> > or less suspended versions of the Koosah/Jett Creek.
>> >
>> > The Limbo was famous for pogo. I am guessing that if the shock was
>> > softened so the ride was not harsh, it would pogo. If you still want
>> > to consider the bike, make sure about this.
>> >
>> > In any case, since it is a discontinued model, if you do decide to go
>> > for it, you should get a discount.
>> >
>> > Ride some other bikes too, if they are available.

>>
>> Pogo is usually a design issue where the swingarm pivot is above the
>> chainline causing a torque reaction to pedalling.

>
> Would it not also be caused by inadequate dampening by the shock? I
> suspect
> that is more likely the case here than by peddling


Whether it's poor swingarm placement or the operation of the shock, no water
is involved. The term FWIW is damping, not dampening. and if it is the
shock, it could be, in addition to damping, the wrong spring rate. I have an
HP Speedmachine with a DT Swiss air shock. There is NO pogo! Now if I can
only find and fix that annoying squeek.
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Mark Leuck wrote:

> "harv" <harv*don't*send*spam*to me*@spininternet.com> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>"john riley" <[email protected].net> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>
>>>FWIW the Limbo is about to be replace by the Spider and Nasoke, more
>>>or less suspended versions of the Koosah/Jett Creek.
>>>
>>>The Limbo was famous for pogo. I am guessing that if the shock was
>>>softened so the ride was not harsh, it would pogo. If you still want
>>>to consider the bike, make sure about this.
>>>
>>>In any case, since it is a discontinued model, if you do decide to go
>>>for it, you should get a discount.
>>>
>>>Ride some other bikes too, if they are available.

>>
>>Pogo is usually a design issue where the swingarm pivot is above the
>>chainline causing a torque reaction to pedalling.

>
>
> Would it not also be caused by inadequate dampening by the shock? I suspect
> that is more likely the case here than by peddling[.]


What does selling wares have to do with pogo?

Here is a rear suspension design that eliminates pogo by placing the
jackshaft concentric with the suspension pivot.
<http://www.ihpva.org/incoming/2002/Dragonflyer/df2.jpg>.

--
Tom Sherman - Curmudgeon and Pedant
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
harv wrote:

> There is NO pogo! Now if I can only find and fix that annoying
> squeek.


Mine squeaked like mouse pr0n from the /front/ end for ages. Pulling it
apart and regreasing everything fixed it, though it took a while to figure
out how to get the lower steering bearing back in (the solution, according
to HP Velotechnik, is to use a bigger hammer)

--

Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
World Domination?
Just find a world that's into that kind of thing, then chain to the
floor and walk up and down on it in high heels. (Mr. Sunshine)
 
S

Steve Knight

Guest
O

>Mine squeaked like mouse pr0n from the /front/ end for ages. Pulling it
>apart and regreasing everything fixed it, though it took a while to figure
>out how to get the lower steering bearing back in (the solution, according
>to HP Velotechnik, is to use a bigger hammer)


the one I am buying squeaks too I will make sure they fix it before I take it
home (G)

--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
 
S

Steve Knight

Guest
O

>Mine squeaked like mouse pr0n from the /front/ end for ages. Pulling it
>apart and regreasing everything fixed it, though it took a while to figure
>out how to get the lower steering bearing back in (the solution, according
>to HP Velotechnik, is to use a bigger hammer)


the one I am buying squeaks too I will make sure they fix it before I take it
home (G)

--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
See http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.