this looks painful



suzyj

New Member
Mar 22, 2004
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SteveA said:
Why oh why would you race without gloves?

SteveA

I forgot my gloves once in a crit. I crashed at speed after a couple of laps, and it was _very_ painful. Interestingly enough, I've never forgotten them since...

Regards,

Suzy
 
S

Stuart Lamble

Guest
On 2004-12-06, Tamyka Bell <[email protected]> wrote:
> Hey, I ain't stupid enough to put my hands down first. Gloves ain't
> gonna stop that broken wrist, either!


Reminds me of back in my goal umpiring days (Aussie Rules -- VAFA
matches, if anybody really cares.) I was running backwards (as you do)
to get under the flight of the ball (as goal umpires are supposed to do,
so they know if it's a goal or a point). Hit some uneven ground, went
over backwards, put my (left) hand out to save myself, and broke the
scaphoid in the process.

Six weeks in plaster. Not fun.

This was during my final year of university. The time in plaster
basically put me out as an umpire for the rest of the season. For some
reason, I didn't go back to that job after the bone healed. :) (That
had more to do with the money than the injury, though, to be fair. A
Saturday, essentially wiped, for less than fifty bucks? No thanks.)

--
My Usenet From: address now expires after two weeks. If you email me, and
the mail bounces, try changing the bit before the "@" to "usenet".
 
H

hippy

Guest
"Tamyka Bell" <[email protected]> wrote
> hippy wrote:
> > WHY GLOVES ARE GOOD:
> >

http://www.cyclingnews.com/photos.php?id=photos/2004/dec04/southbank04/Bgarde-fall2_3335
>
> Hey, I ain't stupid enough to put my hands down first. Gloves ain't
> gonna stop that broken wrist, either!


I'm not so nimble/swift-of-mind to know what the hell
my hands are doing - I'm pretty sure I stick 'em out at
every oppurtunity.. stupid I know.. but, I'd rather have
a busted wrist 'without' the need to scrub gravel out of
the attached palm as well..
I'm nowhere near perfect - I forgot my gloves on the
track the other week. Lucky it was track and I was
already worried :)

hippy
 

xisle

New Member
Feb 15, 2004
46
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0
The only time I don't try and put my hands down first is when I'm better served by the tuck-head-in-and-summersault technique.

I figure as long as you don't land with a stiff arm you're better off hitting the ground with a padded glove and trying absorb some of the impact.
 
M

Marty Wallace

Guest
"xisle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> The only time I don't try and put my hands down first is when I'm better
> served by the tuck-head-in-and-summersault technique.
>
> I figure as long as you don't land with a stiff arm you're better off
> hitting the ground with a padded glove and trying absorb some of the
> impact.
>
>
> --
> xisle
>


Everyone talks about this tuck -and-roll method for falling off a bike but
I've seen a lot of crashes in my time and I've NEVER seen anyone do anything
like that. Usually they've slammed onto the ground before they know what's
happening. How do you tuck and roll when you're clipped into your pedals.
Are there any video clips that demonstrate this?

Marty
 

oely

New Member
Jun 4, 2004
231
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Marty Wallace said:
Everyone talks about this tuck -and-roll method for falling off a bike but
I've seen a lot of crashes in my time and I've NEVER seen anyone do anything
like that. Usually they've slammed onto the ground before they know what's
happening. How do you tuck and roll when you're clipped into your pedals.
Are there any video clips that demonstrate this?

Marty

Watch some Jackass video clips?
 
H

hippy

Guest
"Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote
> Marty Wallace wrote:
> > Everyone talks about this tuck -and-roll method for falling off a bike

but
> > I've seen a lot of crashes in my time and I've NEVER seen anyone do

anything
> > like that.

>
> You have to train yourself to say roll, roll stupid, roll {:)
> It works, so long as that is all you DO.


I just don't think that any amount of practise rolling on grass (for me)
would help when I'm doing 50kph, about to cough up a lung, heart
and last night's dinner and the rider in front clips a wheel or something
and I hit him.. I'd be tarmac-toast before I know what's happened..
Some crashes I reckon the roll thing would work - the long, drawn
out, over the bars, 'look ma I'm flying" kinda ones.. others.. well
maybe if I'd paid more attention in gymnastics lessons.. :)

> > Usually they've slammed onto the ground before they know what's
> > happening. How do you tuck and roll when you're clipped into your

pedals.
>
> Rip yourself out fast!


...and when you're practically bolted to the bike when track racing??

hippy
 
H

Huw

Guest

>> You have to train yourself to say roll, roll stupid, roll {:)
>> It works, so long as that is all you DO.

>


Apparently, judo is good for this. You spend a lot of time learning how to be thrown, until landing safely is instinctive.
 

Shabby

New Member
Mar 13, 2003
617
2
0
Huw said:

>> You have to train yourself to say roll, roll stupid, roll {:)
>> It works, so long as that is all you DO.

>


Apparently, judo is good for this. You spend a lot of time learning how to be thrown, until landing safely is instinctive.

Yep, I did judo as a kid and have survived many crashes with nothing more than scars on top of the scars which are already there (and show up every summer because they tan much darker). It's because every time we'd be somersaulting over up to 10 people (and then having to land). They teach you to fall first because after that you spend a lot of time getting thrown onto the floor. It becomes an automatic response, which I'm glad to have, but I doubt anyone can do it consciously (if you have time to think, avoid the crash).

And the crashes I'km talking about are track crashes, commuting through the air at speed and landing in a cafe, mountain bike crashes (apparently your front wheel stops when it hits a 1m deep hole full of mud) and the inevitable sliding out the back wheel in the wet going around a corner crashes that happen every 6 months or so.
 

Resound

New Member
May 15, 2004
430
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Huw said:

>> You have to train yourself to say roll, roll stupid, roll {:)
>> It works, so long as that is all you DO.

>


Apparently, judo is good for this. You spend a lot of time learning how to be thrown, until landing safely is instinctive.

It is. I did judo as a kid and the tuck and roll thing is instinctive for me. I still got scraped up a bit the couple of times I've fallen because even though getting out of the pedals wasn't a problem, the bike is still between your legs. Having said that, I'm willing to bet I would have gotten scraped a lot worse had I just put out the hand and slid along the asphalt.
 
M

Marty Wallace

Guest
"Shabby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Huw Wrote:
> >
> > >> You have to train yourself to say roll, roll stupid, roll {:)
> > >> It works, so long as that is all you DO.
> > >

> >
> > Apparently, judo is good for this. You spend a lot of time learning how
> > to be thrown, until landing safely is instinctive.

>
> Yep, I did judo as a kid and have survived many crashes with nothing
> more than scars on top of the scars which are already there (and show
> up every summer because they tan much darker). It's because every time
> we'd be somersaulting over up to 10 people (and then having to land).
> They teach you to fall first because after that you spend a lot of time
> getting thrown onto the floor. It becomes an automatic response, which
> I'm glad to have, but I doubt anyone can do it consciously (if you have
> time to think, avoid the crash).
>
> And the crashes I'km talking about are track crashes, commuting through
> the air at speed and landing in a cafe, mountain bike crashes
> (apparently your front wheel stops when it hits a 1m deep hole full of
> mud) and the inevitable sliding out the back wheel in the wet going
> around a corner crashes that happen every 6 months or so.
>
>
> --
> Shabby
>


I've done Karate and gymnastics (third in the state) as a kid, I've ridden
mad horses, I've done the Avon Descent canoe race three times and didn't
fall out once in the last one (in a pretty tippy kayak) and I've done a huge
amount of mountain bike riding and I've even done some road racing. So I
reckon I've got pretty good good reflexes. And I reckon that except for when
you do a bit of a nose dive on a mountain bike, or get thrown over the top
when you forget to keep pedaling on a track bike, for all other cases you
could probably forget about the tuck-roll. I'm assuming you're clipped in to
your pedals too, since most serious riders use clips these days.
I have to admit I saw Danny do a somersault on his road bike (don't forget
to wipe the oil of the rim after spraying your chain !) but that was after
hitting a kerb dead on at 60 km/h, and he stayed clipped in through the
whole crash. That was exceptional circumstances. He was left with a
permanent sagging shoulder after that.

Marty
 
T

Terry Collins

Guest
hippy wrote:
>
> "Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote
> > Marty Wallace wrote:
> > > Everyone talks about this tuck -and-roll method for falling off a bike

> but
> > > I've seen a lot of crashes in my time and I've NEVER seen anyone do

> anything
> > > like that.

> >
> > You have to train yourself to say roll, roll stupid, roll {:)
> > It works, so long as that is all you DO.

>
> I just don't think that any amount of practise rolling on grass (for me)
> would help when I'm doing 50kph, about to cough up a lung, heart
> and last night's dinner and the rider in front clips a wheel or something
> and I hit him.. I'd be tarmac-toast before I know what's happened..


That is why I emphasise that it has to be something you have trained
yourself to just do and you don't stop and think about. You start into a
roll (drop shoulder and twist) so that when you hit the ground (and
hopefully nothing else) your body tends to keep rolling rather than play
cheese grater with the ground. I certainly are not going to practise on
my local side street {:-(.

You really are trying to minimise the damage, both short term and long
term. In my experience any crash is going to hurt. More so if you try to
stop rather than roll.

I've never been in a racing crash (because I don't race/never have), but
on the other occassions, when I've gone for a roll I've certainly come
off better than when I haven't. (Thinks of current tendancy to bash
knees into gravel when mtb slides out)
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
hippy wrote:
>
> "Terry Collins" <[email protected]> wrote
> > Marty Wallace wrote:
> > > Everyone talks about this tuck -and-roll method for falling off a bike

> but
> > > I've seen a lot of crashes in my time and I've NEVER seen anyone do

> anything
> > > like that.

> >
> > You have to train yourself to say roll, roll stupid, roll {:)
> > It works, so long as that is all you DO.

>
> I just don't think that any amount of practise rolling on grass (for me)
> would help when I'm doing 50kph, about to cough up a lung, heart
> and last night's dinner and the rider in front clips a wheel or something
> and I hit him.. I'd be tarmac-toast before I know what's happened..
> Some crashes I reckon the roll thing would work - the long, drawn
> out, over the bars, 'look ma I'm flying" kinda ones.. others.. well
> maybe if I'd paid more attention in gymnastics lessons.. :)
>
> > > Usually they've slammed onto the ground before they know what's
> > > happening. How do you tuck and roll when you're clipped into your

> pedals.
> >
> > Rip yourself out fast!

>
> ..and when you're practically bolted to the bike when track racing??
>
> hippy


You know those ?Adidas? ads that say things like "Running makes you a
better soccer player" etc... well they were print ads... well anyway

Circus makes you a better falling-off-you-bike person...

T
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
Huw wrote:
>
> >> You have to train yourself to say roll, roll stupid, roll {:)
> >> It works, so long as that is all you DO.

> >

>
> Apparently, judo is good for this. You spend a lot of time learning how to be thrown, until landing safely is instinctive.


(Okay I confess it's not really circus that makes me good at landing...)

T
 

SteveA

New Member
Jul 15, 2004
1,309
0
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Tamyka Bell said:
hippy wrote:
>
> "byron27" <[email protected]
> > http://tinyurl.com/6mott

>
> WHY GLOVES ARE GOOD:
> http://www.cyclingnews.com/photos.php?id=photos/2004/dec04/southbank04/Bgarde-fall2_3335
>
> hippy "told you so"


Hey, I ain't stupid enough to put my hands down first. Gloves ain't
gonna stop that broken wrist, either!

(okay you kinda have a little bit of a point maybe)
Obviously need to keep hands on bars and not outstretched - SPD type devices to keep gloves and handlebars in close attachment?

My road crashes have involved the bike and me sliding, so no real opportunity to roll. On the other hand, as a pedestrian I was hid by a courier van. I flew into the air and whilst suspended mid air (or that's what it felt like) I knew I had to roll when I hit the road (and get to my feet and off the road so I would not be pavement pizza under the wheels of the oncoming cars). Judo through school and uni worked for me on that occasion. Perhaps the Rugby that I played at that time also helped me survive being hit by the van (honestly, ref, I never provoked him :) )

SteveA
 
T

Tamyka Bell

Guest
SteveA wrote:
>

<snip>
> My road crashes have involved the bike and me sliding, so no real
> opportunity to roll. On the other hand, as a pedestrian I was hid by a
> courier van. I flew into the air and whilst suspended mid air (or
> that's what it felt like) I knew I had to roll when I hit the road (and
> get to my feet and off the road so I would not be pavement pizza under
> the wheels of the oncoming cars). Judo through school and uni worked
> for me on that occasion. Perhaps the Rugby that I played at that time
> also helped me survive being hit by the van (honestly, ref, I never
> provoked him :) )
>

Most of my bike stacks have been low speed - e.g. hitting a corner too
fast and finding wet, slimy cement as I rode out of the building on my
MTB, sliding etc; however I did have one good one out in the Glasshouse
Mtns. We were heading out along the road and a logging truck came to
pass us so we pulled over as far as we could. I didn't have a helmet,
because I'd forgotten it, and didn't want to drive 3 hours to get it and
get back there. This meant I was going a bit slower than I would've
normally, I guess, but it still would've been about 30 km/h. I dropped
off the edge of the road onto the gravel so stayed there, looking for
somewhere to pop back up. Brand new MTB, and I didn't know that the
store hadn't set it up very well, and it felt a bit shaky. I found my
spot, turned the wheel far and pushed it up over the lip, only to
discover that my new tyres were fatter than on my old bike, so I didn't
make it. And I stacked it. As I came off, I rolled forwards and to the
right, kind of diagonally along the handlebars, kept rolling down from
shoulder to opposite hip. Next thing I know, I'm standing at the side of
the road with my team mates staring stunned at me... what did I do?
They said "you grabbed your bike!" and I had no idea what they were on
about. As it turns out, my instinct was to roll to standing, grab my
bike and step off the road. I think the reason I grabbed my bike was
that it was blocking the shortest path off the road. Either way, it was
a good move and a fast one. The next logging truck missed me by about a
metre.

T
 

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