Thoughts on best touring bike?



Any opinions on brands and models?

I'm abt to start shopping in earnest soon.

I'm thinking Bruce Gordon BLT but open to other
suggestions

I'm even going to REI to look at the Novara tour bike
 
K

Ken C. M.

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Any opinions on brands and models?
>
> I'm abt to start shopping in earnest soon.
>
> I'm thinking Bruce Gordon BLT but open to other
> suggestions
>
> I'm even going to REI to look at the Novara tour bike


Well the Trek 520 is a favorite of many riders.

Ken
--
New cycling jersey: $49
new cycling shorts: $39
Not being a slave to the petrol pump: priceless.

contact me here: http://www.bikesandmoreonline.com/contact.html
 
I bought a Co-Motion Americano 5 years ago, best all-around bike I've
owned. Commuter, double century bike, it is worth the $$$.

Tom
Portland, Oregon


[email protected] wrote:
> Any opinions on brands and models?
>
> I'm abt to start shopping in earnest soon.
>
> I'm thinking Bruce Gordon BLT but open to other
> suggestions
>
> I'm even going to REI to look at the Novara tour bike
 
J

JeffWills

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Any opinions on brands and models?
>
> I'm abt to start shopping in earnest soon.
>
> I'm thinking Bruce Gordon BLT but open to other
> suggestions
>
> I'm even going to REI to look at the Novara tour bike


It won't mean squat if the bike doesn't fit right. If you're going to
spend day after day in the saddle, you need to be sure that minor
issues won't drive you bananas. You should work out what your most
comfortable position is, then work on finding a bike that fits those
dimensions.

Jeff
 
"JeffWills" <[email protected]> wrote:

>It won't mean squat if the bike doesn't fit right. If you're going to
>spend day after day in the saddle, you need to be sure that minor
>issues won't drive you bananas. You should work out what your most
>comfortable position is, then work on finding a bike that fits those
>dimensions.


Agree

And point taken

But I live in small town abt 2 hrs north of St
Louis...so its hard to find any local bike shops

Have to go to St Louis
 

> Have to go to St Louis ??


well, you can accumalte the parts on sale mail order from
nashbar/loosescrews in january february or now nbar has the deore rear
deray on sale
and buy cr-18 front rim or mavic touring rear at 35c
tires to fit
wheels mfg axles
used gordon racks
minkow seat
specialized tubes
the list goes on...and you do not get this stuff on a new fuji no
matter how nice a new fuji maybe it will not be equiped

nbar has a touring frame
or measure and get a custom
the measure idea is a good one as the right dimensions are a lot easier
on the knees
 
J

JeffWills

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> "JeffWills" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >It won't mean squat if the bike doesn't fit right. If you're going to
> >spend day after day in the saddle, you need to be sure that minor
> >issues won't drive you bananas. You should work out what your most
> >comfortable position is, then work on finding a bike that fits those
> >dimensions.

>
> Agree
>
> And point taken
>
> But I live in small town abt 2 hrs north of St
> Louis...so its hard to find any local bike shops
>
> Have to go to St Louis


Urgh- do you have a bike *now* that you like to ride all day? Or one
that's close? Its dimensions will give you a baseline for finding a
bike that's close to the right fit.

FWIW: I live close to bicycle-mad Portland, Oregon, so I have a large
number of places to shop, and it's about two hours away from the
Co-Motion factory, builders of the aforementioned Americano touring
bike: http://www.co-motion.com/Amerc.html

If you feel confident about your mechanical skills, and the dimensions
are appropriate, you could build up a bike entirely online. A Surly
Lang Haul Trucker frame might make a good starting
point:http://www.surlybikes.com/longhaul.html

Jeff
 
B

Brian Huntley

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Any opinions on brands and models?
>
> I'm abt to start shopping in earnest soon.
>
> I'm thinking Bruce Gordon BLT but open to other
> suggestions
>
> I'm even going to REI to look at the Novara tour bike


Urbanites are nice, but I've found (like many bikes) I can't fill a
750ml water bottle in the 3rd cage. But the gearing and brakes were the
way I wanted them on day one, with no swapping of parts required.
 
T

Tim McNamara

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
wrote:

> Any opinions on brands and models?
>
> I'm abt to start shopping in earnest soon.
>
> I'm thinking Bruce Gordon BLT but open to other suggestions


In terms of bang for the buck, that's pretty hard to beat. The
Rivendell Atlantis would be another good option, but would cost more.
Treek and Cannondale both offer (or at least used to) touring bikes.
 
"JeffWills" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Urgh- do you have a bike *now* that you like to ride all day? Or one
>that's close? Its dimensions will give you a baseline for finding a
>bike that's close to the right fit.


Only bike I have now is a ti MT bike

I had thought abt using it for tours.... but man its so
slow on the road
 
"JeffWills" <[email protected]> wrote:

>FWIW: I live close to bicycle-mad Portland, Oregon, so I have a large
>number of places to shop, and it's about two hours away from the
>Co-Motion factory, builders of the aforementioned Americano touring
>bike: http://www.co-motion.com/Amerc.html


Boy that co-motion bike does look very nice!!

>If you feel confident about your mechanical skills, and the dimensions
>are appropriate, you could build up a bike entirely online. A Surly
>Lang Haul Trucker frame might make a good starting
>point:http://www.surlybikes.com/longhaul.html


will taker a lookise

what's everyone think abt frame material?

stick with steel?

aluminum?

titanium?
 
4

41

Guest
[email protected] wrote:

> what's everyone think abt frame material?
>
> stick with steel?
>
> aluminum?
>
> titanium?


You haven't told us the two key pieces of information needed to give
you any sensible advice, namely:

(1) What do you mean by "touring"? (2) How much are you willing to pay?

For some of us, "touring" means a large Carradice saddlebag
<www.wallbike.com>, with perhaps a handlebar bag. Ideal for that is a
so-called "sport-touring" or "Audax" geometry bicycle, with 25mm-32mm
tires, possibly fenders, long chainstays, low bottom bracket. Something
not too different from what might have won the Tour de France from
1950-1976. For others, it means 90lbs of baggage hanging from front and
rear panniers. For that, you need something different, like the
Co-Motion Americano. Compare that with something like
<http://www.sjscycles.com/thornwebsite/audaxclassic.html>
or the various touring or Audax bicycles at
<http://www.merciancycles.com/bikes.asp>

For most general light touring (not camping out overnight), you won't
beat a custom bicycle made out of Reynolds 725, 531 or similar, in
sport touring geometry, with a Carradice Camper or Super C, and your
choice of handlebar bag up front. The general idea is like a Rivendell
Rambouillet, or the Thorn or Mercian bicycles above, but made by your
choice of builder, with your choice of fittings and paint job. Do you
want built-in lights? Kickstand? What type of brakes? Fenders? What
size tires? Do you want S&S couplers? Etc. Forget carbon
fiber-reinforced resin for touring. Aluminum won't get you many custom
builders who can get you whatever you want, and titanium is expensive
or else not available in an ideal configuration for touring, and you
still have to get the fork made out of something else, without any real
concrete benefit for touring. Both aluminum and titanium require fat
tubes which aren't the best for touring geometry and tires and fenders.

Your choice of builders in steel is nearly limitless, although I don't
know of any local to your area. Check the list at the S&S torque
couplers site:
<http://www.sandsmachine.com/fbplist.htm>
or at the Henry James site:
<http://www.henryjames.com/blocator.html>
You can do extremely well for about $750-$1800+ for the frame,
depending on your choice of builder and how fancy you want it. Or you
can go for something more generic, from Soma or Surly. Or you can go
the eBay route for something really inexpensive.

Tell us more, and you will get more. Don't forget to visit the Trento
bicycle pages, and to view Jobst's packing list:
<http://www.trentobike.org/General/Packing_List.html>
v
 
S

spokehead

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> What's everyone abt disk brakes on both wheels
>
> Nice to have?
>
> Or fluff?


Nice to have, but make sure that the wheels are not radially laced.
Radially laced wheels have no way to resist wrapping around the axle.
Remember, the wheel hangs from the top two spokes in anormal wheel, so
from only one spoke in a radially-laced wheel, and when that spoke
snaps, the load will be transferred to the rest of the spokes in short
order, and they will fall like dominoes. If you must use disk brakes
on a radially spoked wheel make SURE to get straight-guage spokes, NOT
double-butted which are weaker in the middle and will snap sooner.

-spokehead
 
B

Brian Huntley

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> What's everyone abt disk brakes on both wheels
>
> Nice to have?
>
> Or fluff?


Wouldn't they interfer with panniers?
 
T

Ted Bennett

Guest
"spokehead" <[email protected]> wrote:

> [email protected] wrote:
> > What's everyone abt disk brakes on both wheels
> >
> > Nice to have?
> >
> > Or fluff?

>
> Nice to have, but make sure that the wheels are not radially laced.
> Radially laced wheels have no way to resist wrapping around the axle.
> Remember, the wheel hangs from the top two spokes in anormal wheel, so
> from only one spoke in a radially-laced wheel, and when that spoke
> snaps, the load will be transferred to the rest of the spokes in short
> order, and they will fall like dominoes. If you must use disk brakes
> on a radially spoked wheel make SURE to get straight-guage spokes, NOT
> double-butted which are weaker in the middle and will snap sooner.
>
> -spokehead


I do hope that is some sort of attempt at humor, because it's very
wrong. Bad advice. No wonder spokehead writes anonymously.

--
Ted Bennett
 
T

Tim McNamara

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"spokehead" <[email protected]> wrote:

> [email protected] wrote:
> > What's everyone abt disk brakes on both wheels
> >
> > Nice to have?
> >
> > Or fluff?

>
> Nice to have, but make sure that the wheels are not radially laced.
> Radially laced wheels have no way to resist wrapping around the axle.
> Remember, the wheel hangs from the top two spokes in anormal wheel,
> so from only one spoke in a radially-laced wheel, and when that spoke
> snaps, the load will be transferred to the rest of the spokes in
> short order, and they will fall like dominoes. If you must use disk
> brakes on a radially spoked wheel make SURE to get straight-guage
> spokes, NOT double-butted which are weaker in the middle and will
> snap sooner.


Please don't feed the troll.